The Story of David Burlock Lamoreaux

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A Collection of Stories About

My Great Grand Father

By Archibald Orrell Lamoreaux

By Edith I Lamoreaux

By H. Lloyd Wolford

By Ruth Smith

By Harold Dane L’Amoureux
Compiled by

April Rowley Coleman


March 2002 – November 2004
Stories from:

The Story of David Burlock Lamoreaux

By his son Archibald Orrell Lamoreaux


“The Lamoureux Record,” No. 2 = April, 1939 =

A Study of The Lamoureux Family in America,”

Edited by Harold Dane L’Amoureux
REMEMBERING

Pioneer Day July 24, 1981 - Logan, Utah

By H. Lloyd Wolford
DAVID ALBERT LAMOREAUX HISTORY
History of Disease & Medical Care in Cache Valley

Ruth Smith, Special Collections Utah Stats University –

9792 R426s No 96 - pages 8 & 9
Preston’s Choir Members

The Citizen – In Passing - 3 November 1966

Picture included
Temple Index Bureau Cards - TIB Cards

Early Church Records Index


Military Index on Micro film

Sent to me by Jim, my cousin, Dr James Lamoreaux, Utah Nov 1982


IGI – Utah Aug 1980

A search for Lamoreaux info in Utah


1850 Utah Census
The Official Minutes of Nauvoo Lodge [Masons]

The Story of David Burlock Lamoreaux

By his son Archibald Orrell Lamoreaux

My notes are in [brackets] High-lighting indicates my ancestors.

One day as David Burlock Lamoreaux was cutting timber, the tree he was cutting fell against another that was standing, the top broke off and flew back and hit him in the head, cutting the flesh and nose, crushing some of the bones and causing the flesh and skin to fall upon his cheeks. He fell into the water, his head resting on the ice. How long he was in this condition he does not know, but when he regained consciousness he had to raise the skin and flesh up so he could see. His senses were clouded and he started in the opposite direction from his home. He finally came to a house where a woman was hanging out clothes. She screamed when she saw him covered with blood and holding the flesh up over his eyes. They were Gentiles but took him in and did what they could for him. He did not remember his name but finally one asked if his name was Lamoreaux and he remembered and cautioned them how to tell his father and mother.

The third day when the pain was almost unbearable, two men walked up to the place he was still at the place of the Gentiles, and asked for Lamoreaux. They replied that he was still there but was sick and could not be seen. The men said they had been sent and must see him. All left the house but these men and his father. They went in and anointed and blessed him, rebuking the pain and he was relieved and never suffered pain in his head anymore. [If his father, John McCord Lamoreaux, was there this had to have happened before 1848.]
[ANOTHER STORY]

On the 5th of June 1881 David Burlock took down with Asiatic Cholera. In less than twenty-four hours his flesh had so shrunken that he seemed skin and bones and was nearly dead. His eyes were glazed and was unconscious. A number of Elders had watched him all day and thought there was no chance for recovery. Apostle Moses Thatcher, who was there, proposed they dedicate him to the Lord so he could be released from his misery. A number of Elders with Apostle Thatcher as mouth undertook to dedicate him, but they could not because the spirit prompted them to pronounce life. The spirit was so insistent that they yielded and blessed him to live. He recovered and lived many years. The bulk of his temple work was done after his sickness. He received his endowments and was sealed in the Kirtland Temple and when the Logan Temple was completed he did all the work for his near relatives. [David Burlock Lamoreaux received his endowment at Nauvoo. He and Mary Ann Gribble were married in the Kirtland Temple. Kirtland had no endowment for the general members. He and his son Archibald helped build the Logan Temple.]

In the early days of Utah while Ezra T Benson, an Apostle, was presiding over the Cache Stake of Zion, there was an accident in Bear Lake, Utah, where Apostle Charles C. Rich was presiding. The snow fell so heavy it caved in the roof of the house in which a Brother Sirrine had taken shelter with his wife, Ester Ann Sirrine. It threw Sister Sirrine’s hip out of place. There was no doctor in Bear Lake Valley and the snow was so deep that it was impossible to cross the mountain between Bear Lake and Cache Valley where Dr. D. B. Lamoreaux lived. It was over six weeks before it was possible to cross.

They finally crossed and found Dr. Lamoreaux and when they told how long that it had been since the accident, the Dr. told the messenger that there was no known remedy that would hold it in place after setting it. Just then Apostle Benson came where the two were talking. They repeated to him what the verdict was and when they were finished Brother Benson placed his hand on the shoulder of the Dr. and said, “Go, Brother David, and God bless you.”
While going over a very dangerous piece of the road, the sleigh struck a rock and at that very instant a vision was given to the Dr. showing him how to hold it in place. The Dr. was a carpenter too, and he went into the carpenter shop and blacksmith shop and made the brace according to the pattern given him in the vision.
The operation was performed, Apostle Charles C Rich attended, and he lead in prayer before starting the operation. It was successful and Sister Sirrine lived many years, coming to Salt River Valley in Arizona.
Another incident in David Burlock’s life was after the battle between the United States and the Indians in Idaho, at a place called Battle Creek on Bear River. The Army Surgeon picked up my father, Dr. D. B. Lamoreaux, as they passed thru Ogden on the road to Fort Douglas near Salt Lake City. Father assisted him with the injured soldiers.
Father was a first class mill right. He built the sawmill that sawed all the native lumber for the Logan Temple. Many of the buildings that he built in Cache Valley and also in Farmington are still intact, especially the house in which his oldest son Archibald was born, 15 Sept 1857. He was a real pioneer and his son Archibald, was his companion in his joys and sorrow. He was never seen to do an unmanly act.

“The Lamoureux Record,” No. 2 = April, 1939 =

“A Study of The Lamoureux Family in America,”

Edited by Harold Dane L’Amoureux

Page 15-16 gives this record of David Burlock Lamoreaux

* * * * * * *
DAVID BURLOCK LAMOREAUX

Born 20 September 1819; died 26 November 1905




David Burlock Lamoreaux was descended from Daniel (29 Nov. 1695) through the seventh son, Josué (9 Jan. 1739), and thence through Josué’s son John McCord Lamoreaux 19 July 1774). He was a true pioneer of the west and his name is firmly interwoven in the early history of Utah.
He was born in Pickering, Ontario, 20 Sept 1819, and in 1838 married Mary Ann Gribble, thereafter spending eight years in Ohio. There were nine children from this first marriage. In 1856 he married Nancy Miriam Orrell of English ancestry and from this second union there were born 10 children. From seven of David Burlock’s sons who married there sprang 53 children so it is quite easy to see that the wide extent of the family name throughout Utah and the states to the west is in large measure due to this early pioneer. (Another sizeable group of the family in the west is descended from David Burlock’s brother Andrew and it is of this group that considerable more information is yet to be gathered to complete the record of that branch.)

In 1853 DBL crossed the plains to Utah where he took a prominent part in the settlement of that wilderness country. He was a farmer and a carpenter and many of the early structures of the Cache valley bore testimony to his skill with the tools of his trade.

[Page] 16

Aside from his ability as a carpenter he developed wonderful skill as a surgeon. As the only surgeon in the valley for many years, he was able on countless occasions to alleviate the suffering of his fellow men and it is for his service in this field that he is best remembered. Surgical science was not greatly advanced in those early days and David Burlock devised many bits of original apparatus as aids used to this present day.

Throughout his long life of service to humanity he remained devoutly loyal to his religion and at the time of his death, 26 Nov. 1905, countless friends throughout Utah and the surrounding territory raised their voices in earnest testimony to his worth as a Christian and a friend to mankind. He was truly a pioneer of the Lamoureux family and should be enrolled as one of our notable members.

REMEMBERING

Pioneer Day July 24, 1981

Logan, Utah

By H. Lloyd Wolford

My notes are in [brackets] High-lighting indicates my ancestors.

On Friday morning, March 16, 1979, I awoke from a dream I had and could not forget it. It was in our cemetery. Lucille, my wife, and I were standing where our grave spots are; also near where Lucille’s pioneer grandparents are buried, David Burlock Lamoreaux and Nancy Orrell Lamoreaux, one of his wives.


As my dream continued I saw people moving around and one woman stood before me and said, “Do you know me?” and I said, “I can hardly place you.” “You know of me anyway,” she replied. While I pondered, a man came and stood beside her and smiled, not saying a word. I then awoke.
Some time later, I came across a picture of Lucille’s grandparents [David and Nancy Lamoreaux] and recognized them to be the man and woman in my frame. Knowing they didn’t have a marker on their graves, I had a strong feeling I should get them, even though I was not a blood relative. I soon made an appointment with a monument company, chose the markers to be placed on each grave, and they were soon paid for.

David Burlock Lamoreaux. Born September 20, 1819. Died, September 25, 1905. Nancy Orrell Lamoreaux. Born, April 2, 1834. Died May 17, 1919. Their graves almost forgotten.

Having this dream has brought to mind a few stories about their lives. Grandma Nancy Orrell, a young girl of 16 came to America from England. She crossed the plains and later in Salt Lake City she married David Burlock Lamoreaux in the Endowment House.
David walked all across the plains so that the Nauvoo Bell could ride in his wagon. [I wonder about this. David rescued a bell and took it some place but records say he didn’t enter Salt Lake Valley till 1850… the temple bell was here in 1847? Jane savage says that David’s daughter, Jane, “walked so the bell could ride.”]
He was later called and set apart by President Brigham Young as a doctor and a dentist. In this capacity he labored for many years. One incident was told to me by an older man who at one time had Dr. Lamoreaux extract a tooth. The man described it in words I shall not repeat! Today we can sit and relax while dental work is being done.
As a doctor, he was very good at bone setting and surgery. He had a firm belief that although in service of the Lord, you are not immune from hardships and difficulties, but are given added strength to carry on. He had an unfortunate accident. A falling tree hit him and left a hole in his head which never healed.
An organ was purchased by David in 1878, and was later sold to the Brigham Young College, located at the time in Logan at 200 North and 100 East. Miss Ida Cook was the principal of the college. The school was unable to pay for the organ, so it was returned to David and has remained in the family since.
The [Logan] Tabernacle Choir did much of their practicing with it in the family home as David and Nancy were members of the choir and their daughter Bertha was the organist for many years. The organ is now on display at the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum in Logan.

DAVID ALBERT LAMOREAUX HISTORY

David Albert Lamoreaux, son of David Burlock and Mary Ann Gribble Lamoreaux, was born the morning the Nauvoo Temple burned, 19 November l848, in Iowa City, Iowa, a city but a short distance.
In the year 1850, when two years of age, his parents made preparations to move westward. That spring they joined a company which was preparing to leave, and in the early summer set out to cross the plains. While coming across they shared all the hardships of the early pioneers but arrived in safety in Salt Lake City in the fall of 1850. They stayed in Salt Lake City that winter, then moved to Farmington, Davis County, Utah.
His father, David Burlock Lamoreaux, was a farmer and carpenter by trade and built the first sawmill north of Salt Lake City, in Farmington. The family stayed here a year or so then moved north to Ogden, Weber County, Utah. While here he built bridges across the Ogden and Weber Rivers.
From Ogden the family moved to Payson, Utah County, Utah. While here he was engaged steadily as a carpenter. He did carpenter work on Simons and Hancock's grist mill and helped build the nail factory, and had charge of building the City Hall.
From Payson the family moved back to Farmington. There Albert, then 12 years of age, hauled the logs to build a two-room house, down Farmington Canyon, a distance of about 6 miles, using only a two-wheeled cart and a yoke of oxen. His father would load the logs at the mill and then Albert would drive the oxen down the ­canyon to Farmington, unload and return for another load. After completing their home and getting a nice orchard started the family again decided to move. This time they went to Logan, Cache Valley Utah in 1862.

Here in Cache Valley, Albert's father again took up carpenter work, building two large bridges, one across Bear River, the other across Cub River. There the same bridges remain strong and steady today.


Although a carpenter by trade, he was also a surgeon and his work along this line would make an interesting story within itself.
Here in Cache Valley, Albert lived with his father and the second fami1y. His mother, three sisters and a brother having previously moved to Paragaonah, Iron County, Utah. He helped his father haul rock and build the new home in Logan.
After arriving here he worked for his brother-in-law, James Montague, from the first of March until the first of November of the next fall, farming and tending cattle. In the following spring he rented Orson Adam's farm and put in about 25 acres of grain with a yoke of oxen. Just as all the fields were looking nicely; the grasshoppers swept down upon them and devoured everything in their wake. The settlers worked hard to save their crops but all in vain. Seeing that his crop was gone he went to work for Anderson and Leew, 1 June 1869, driving the U. S. Mail. After this contract, he went to work for Gilmer and Salisbury driving mail in 1870. It was while working for them that he met Huldah Mariah Messinger in Beaver City.
Settlers were not allowed to travel unless in a company of 20 or more teams and every little while there were raids made by the Indians in which many horses ,and cattle, were stolen, He later carried the first mail that went through the mountains between Panguitch and Paragonah, and continued driving this mail about six years,

History of Disease & Medical Care in Cache Valley

Ruth Smith, Special Collections Utah Stats University –

9792 R426s No 96 - pages 8 & 9

Sent to me from my cousin, Dr James Lamoreaux, Utah Nov 1982

My notes are in [brackets] High-lighting indicates my ancestors.

[Two of my ancestors are mentioned in this work; David Burlock Lamoreaux and Lydia Young Crockett. Lydia’s grand daughter, Lydia Lavera Crockett, and David’s son Archibald Orrell Lamoreaux married and are my great-grandparents.]

Chapter III

GROWTH AND ADVANCEMENT IN MEDICAL CARE

AND CONTROL OF DISEASE 1860-1890

Page 8

Early Care Administered. In the early period care was administered exclusively by men and women in the Valley. These people were not trained, but had acquired a meager knowledge through experience and gave extensive assistance in all diseases and ailments.
The earliest of this kind on record is “Dr.” Henry Huges. He came to the valley in 1860 and settled in Mendon where he gave simple aides for a number of years.
Following “Dr” Hughes came “Dr” Dave Dilley. (“Dr” Dilley lived on the corner where the Budge Clinic now stands - - - Joel Ricks) He remained here but a short time, from 1860 to 1863, when he moved to Ogden. He was one of the first pill makers and had a good business in selling his home manufactured goods to the settlers.
In 1863 “Dr” Lammereaux came to the valley bringing the first phase of surgery. He was generally known as a “bone setter” and traveled all over the valley setting fractures of every kind. He had not been trained but was very successful in performing these minor phases of surgery.
“Dr” H.K. Cranney came to the valley approximately the same time as “Dr” Lammereaux. He did not attempt to set bones but aided in times of sickness and was very fond of administering catnip tea.

History of Disease & Medical Care in Cache Valley

Ruth Smith, Special Collections Utah Stats University –

9792 R426s No 96 - pages 8 & 9

Sent to me from my cousin, Dr James Lamoreaux, Utah Nov 1982

My notes are in [brackets] High-lighting indicates my ancestors.

[Two of my ancestors are mentioned in this work; David Burlock Lamoreaux and Lydia Young Crockett. Lydia’s grand daughter, Lydia Lavera Crockett, and David’s son Archibald Orrell Lamoreaux married and are my great-grandparents.]

Chapter III

GROWTH AND ADVANCEMENT IN MEDICAL CARE

AND CONTROL OF DISEASE 1860-1890


Page 9
Another phase of early care was the practice of the midwives. They were very proficient for their times and had a good practice even after the arrival of qualified physicians. Even in 1890 the mid-wives in the valley were handling the greater portion of maternity cases.
The first and one of the best of these women was Mrs David Crockett, better known as Sister Lydia Crockett. She came from Payson in 1860 and lived in the valley until 1874 when she died at the age of seventy-three. Mrs. Crockett was the most successful and widely known mid-wife of her time. She did not stay exclusively with maternity cases but spent a lot of her time nursing out when any disease was prevalent.
Two women who were not as widely known but never-the-less noteworthy are Mrs Maughan and Mrs Funk. Mrs Maughan came to Cache Valley in 1860 and spent the remainder of her life here as mid-wife and nurse. Mrs Funk spent her time in much the same way but her territory was in Richmond and Lewiston, as she lived in the northern part of the valley.

Mrs Mary McAllister is the next outstanding maternity worker. She took over the practice of Mrs Crockett in 1874, with whom she had worked for several years. She traveled over the entire valley in a horse and buggy as her cases extended from the north end to the southern. Mrs McAllister nursed also, she had a wide spread, successful, practice and is said to have mothered over a thousand babies. Her practice was still flourishing in 1890.

Preston’s Choir Members

The Citizen [a newspaper] – In Passing

3 November 1966 - page 6

At one time Preston had a real going city choir.

That is, back in 1879, Preston had a real going city choir. It was directed by Prof. L.D. Edwards.
The picture – in center of page – was brought in the other day by Lorenzo Hansen, on of Preston’s old timers, and former mayor of the city.
He was quite proud of this picture with the names of all the members of the choir at the bottom.
The members include Prof Edwards (1), Mrs L.D. Edwards (2), L.D. Edwards Jr. (3), Mrs Thos Clayton (4), Emily Fellows (5), J.H. Taylor (6), Annie Taylor (7), T.A. Montague (8), Bertie Montague [dau of DBL] (9), C.C. West (10), W.J. Barnes (11), Pearl Barnes (12), Geo. Carter (13), Ruth Crockett (14), Martha Clayton (15), Maria Clayton (16), Ethel Clayton (17), W. Fjelsted (18), Wm. Fellows (19), Maggie Fellows (20), W Hobbs (21), Mary Anne Hobbs (22), C.R. Hobbs (23), Lousia Hobbs (24), Sarah Hansen (25), Susie Hawkes (26), Mamie Hughes (27), Olive Hughes (28), Emily Hansen (29), P.J. Hansen (30), Albert Johnson (31), Junis Jensen (32), Thos. Kershaw (33), Maggie Kershaw (34), Fred Lamoreaux (35), D.B. Lamoreaux (36), Wm. Larsen (37), L.A. Lamont (38), Mrs Lamont (39), Abbie Lundegreen (40), Martina Lundegreen (41), Parcilla Martin (42), Annie Eliza Martin (43), Matilda Millar (44), P.H. Margartts (45), Olive Nielsen (46), Christina Neilson (47), Hyrum Neilson (48), Eliza Stevenson (49), Geo. Shaffer (50), Matilda Stenberg (51), Carrie Tibbetts (52), Maude West (53), Katie Wilcox (54), Robert Wayman (55), Metina Peterson (56), C.F. Johnson (57), Mrs Johnson (58), Jas Bosworth (59), Peter Jensen (60).

[See copy of picture on next page.]

[David Burlock Lamoreaux sang in Preston Choir. Nancy Miriam Orrell Lamoreaux sang in Logan Tabernacle? Choir.]

[See list of names of people in picture on previous page.]

Temple Index Bureau Cards - TIB Cards

Early Church Records Index

3X5 index of all temple ordinances done

This was replaced by the International Genealogical Index - IGI
Name in full Lamoreaux, Andrew L

When Born 17 Oct 1812

Where born Pickering, York Co, Upper Canada

When died

When blessed

When Baptized Where

Baptized by

When married To

Father John Lamoreaux

Mother Abigail

Ward

Record No. High Priest L Page 18



Enrolled in G.S.L. City 23 Apr 1848 Nauvoo 17 Dec. 1843

- - - - - - - - - - - - -


Name in full Lamoreaux, Archibald Orrell

When Born 20 Sept 1858

Where born Farmington, Davis, Utah

When blessed 7 Apr 1859 By T.C.D. Howell

When Baptized By

When confirmed By

When married To

When endowed Sealed H to W to Parents

When died Where

When buried Where

Father’s name David B. Lamoreaux

Mother’s maiden name Nancy Mirian Orrell

References: H.O. #2536 p 50
(over)

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

Name Lamoreaux, Catharine [2nd wife of John McCord Lamoreaux]

When Born 30 Nov 1773

Where born Parish of Bower, Scotland

Father Alexander Sutherland

Mother Janet

Date of blessing 25 July 1845

Place of blessing Nauvoo, Ill.

Linage Manassah

Patriarch John Smith

Recorded Historians Office, Patriarchal Blessings Vol. 9 page 315 No. 943


  • - - - - - - - - - - - -

Name in full Lamoreaux, David Burlock

When Born 30 or 20 Sept 1819 [hand written in]

Where born Scarborough Co, Upper Canada

When died

When blessed

When Baptized June 1835 Where

Baptized by Phelps

When married To

Father John McCord

Mother Abigal Losee [sic]

Ward Stake

Record No. High Priest L page 18 132

Enrolled 5 Feb 1851 at G.S.L. City, ordained Dec 1843 by Solomon Hancock

List children on reverse side at Morley Settlement

(over)


Ordained Priest – Mar 1837 in Kirtland Temple by Elder Kellog

Ordained Elder by Amos Cox at Lima, Ill.

H.O.Mss.Rec.of H.P. Farmington, Utah

- - - - - - - - - - - - -


Name Lamoreaux - Electa

[Who was she married to? I have it somewhere else]

When Born 7 Oct 1825

Where born Kirtland, Ohio

Father Joshiah Colton

Mother Lovisa

Date of blessing 29 Apr 1845

Place of blessing Nauvoo, Ill

Linage Ephraim

Patriarch John Smith

Recorded Historians Office, Patriarchal Blessings Vol. 9 Page 127 No 399
- - - - - - - - - - - - -

There is also an “Emily C Lamoreaux” in this index born in Ogden, Utah


- - - - - - - - - - - - -

Name Lamoreaux, John

When Born 19 July 1779

Where born New York City, New York

Father Joshua

Mother Elizabeth

Date of blessing 25 July 1845

Place of blessing Nauvoo, Ill.

Linage Joseph [note]

Patriarch John Smith

Recorded Historians Office, Patriarchal Blessings Vol. 9 page 315 No. 942

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

Name in full Lamoreaux, John

When Born

Where born

When died

When blessed

When Baptized Where

Baptized by

When married To

Father


Mother

Ward


Record No. High Priest

Ordained at Nauvoo 8 Oct. 1844

List children on reverse side
- - - - - - - - - - - - -

Military Index on Micro film

Sent to me from my cousin, Dr James Lamoreaux, Utah Nov 1982

My notes are in [brackets] High-lighting indicates my ancestors.


David Burlock Lamoreaux
TE Lamoreaux, David B.

27-1.03 Davis Hill, Dist.

1 September 1857 Appointed Regt [?] Surgeon

#568
TER MIL BOXES

MIROFILM

ROLL 1
TE Lamoreaux, David B.

27-1.17 Logan E.T. Benson Staff

5 March 1868 To be commissioned as brigade

#1,094 Surgeon
TER MIL BOXES

MIROFILM


ROLL 2

TE-O Lamoreaux, David SURGEON’S MATE

00,1 OGDEN CITY BATT OF INF.

1850 Jan 31 [or 1] 1852


EXECUTIVE RECORD BOOK A 1850-1854 page 100
TE Lamoreaux, D B.

27-1.01 Elected - Brigade Surgeon

5 August 1865 Cache Millitary District

#1,290


TER MIL BOXES

MIROFILM

ROLL 2

IGI – Utah Aug 1980

A search for Lamoreaux info in Utah

Lamoreaux, Alta Mira dau of William Geo Lamoreaux


Lamoreaux, Ann John Henry Dewey
Lamoreaux, Archibald Orvel [sic] Male Marriage record Date

Lydia Lovara Crockett 26 Dec 1878 SL - SLC

Sealing date = 26 Dec 1878 EH batch #


Lamoreaux, Caroline Elizabeth Robert John McCond
Lamoreaux, Clarice dau of Andrew Losee Lamoreaux
Lamoreaux, David Albert Hulda Maria Messinger
Lamoreaux, David Burlock Mary Anne Gribble 9 Apr 1852 SL – SLC

Sealing date = 9 Apr 1852 EH batch #



Lamoreaux, David Burlock Nancy Miriam Orrell 2 May 1860 SL–SLC

Sealing date = 2 May 1860 EH batch #


Lamoreaux, Debora James Leithead

Lamoreaux, Deborah James Leithead


Lamoreaux, Errol Leon son Andrew Marion L
Lamoreaux, George Elden son of David Albert
Lamoreaux, Huldah La_Netta dau of David Albert
Lamoreaux, Martha dau of David Albert
Lamoreaux, Mary Ann Josephine Albert W Norton
Lamoreaux, Maud L Huish dau of DB Lamoreux & Nancy M Orcle [sic]
Lamoreaux, Rosa Nellie dau of David L & Nancy Sparks
Lamoreaux, Walter L son of David B Lamoreaux / Nancy M O’Niell [sic]
Lamoreaux, William George Ellen Cordelia Shurliff

1850 Utah Census

My notes are in [brackets] High-lighting indicates my ancestors.
age M/F Occupation value Birth Place

45 David Lamoreaux 31 M Millwright 200 Up Canada

Mary A 34 F L C

Sarah 10 “ Ill

David 2 M Iowa

Mary 4/12 F Des [Deseret]

David W Perkins 27 M N Y

Allen Birdwell [?] 22 “ Farmer “

46 Asa Callrin [?] 41 “ Clerk “

Maryette S 41 F Vert

Hiecotoe [?] 11 M Ind

47 James Leithead 36 “ Farmer 100 Scotland

Deborah [Lamoreaux] 43 F N B[runswick]

Ann C 2 “ Iowa

[Note that David & Deborah, cousins, both have a two year old born in Iowa! Were they together there? That would be about the time of David’s

accident, maybe.]


The Official Minutes of Nauvoo Lodge [Masons]

By Mervin B Hogan

Found in Church History Dept – August 1980


Roster of Men Initiated, Passed, & Raised by

Nauvoo Lodge between 4 Nov 1843 & 31 Dec 1844


Page 23 #450 Pratt, Parley Parker

Raised 7-30, ‘44

#451 Snow, Lorenzo

Raised 11-11, ‘43


Page 31 #685 Lamoreaux, Andrew

10-4, 4, 23, ‘44

#686 Lamoreaux, John

9-21, 23; 10-5, ‘44


Page 32 #691 Leithead, James

7-19, 20; 8-6, ‘44

#698 Losee, Abraham

11-22; 12-11, 11, ‘44


Page 40 #913 Lamoreaux, David B.

12-25, 25, ‘44



DavidBLamroAll my notes are in [brackets] Page of




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