The Tempest

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The Tempest


TEACHIT KS3 INTERACTIVE PACK

SATs Update 2009: 1 Scenes in focus

Lessons 1 – 4

Worksheets/OHTs 1 – 9




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LESSON 1: The story so far

(This is also Lesson 1 of the 2008 online updates.)





Learning Objective

Revise what’s happened in the play so far.



Students should be familiar with the events of the play up to Act 3 Scene 2.

Starter


  • Play a version of the shopping memory game round the class. Start with ‘The characters on the island include the magician Prospero … ’. The next student has to repeat the phrase, adding to the list of characters, and so on. If someone repeats a name or gets stuck they’re out.

Introduction

  • Give students Worksheet 1. Ask them to match the characters to the statements. Take feedback, consolidating knowledge of the story so far.

Development


  • Put students into small groups and hand out Worksheet 2. Give half the groups the first five characters and the other half the next six. Ask them to complete the chart for their characters.

Plenary


  • Take feedback. Students complete the chart for all characters.

  • Establish whether there are any gaps – are there any characters either without loyalty, or bearing no grudges? Which characters are the most / least loyal? Which are the most dangerous?












Worksheet 1: Who’s who?


Match each character given below to their description.


Alonso Antonio Ariel Caliban


Ferdinand Gonzalo Miranda Prospero
Sebastian Stephano Trinculo



I was jealous of my brother’s position and planned his death. Now I’m shipwrecked on the island. I persuaded Alonso’s brother to kill Alonso while he slept, but Gonzalo awoke as soon as we’d drawn our swords.

Years ago I was a loyal and faithful servant to Prospero, the true Duke of Milan. I now serve the King of Naples. Strange beasts have just tried to kill him while we slept.

I am the King’s brother. I’ve just tried to kill him.

I am the King of Naples. My daughter has just married the Prince of Tunis and I was sailing home with my son when I was shipwrecked on the island. I’m searching for my son, who I fear has drowned.

I am a butler to the King. I like a drink. A strange monster has declared me his master.


I am a jester.

I lived on the island alone. Prospero took the island from me by sorcery and made me his slave. Now I have a new master, Stephano.

I am the King’s beloved son. I’ve fallen in love with a beautiful maid, but her father thinks I’m a traitor and is making me serve him.

I am a spirit of the air. I was imprisoned by an evil witch many years ago, but my new master released me in return for my service.

I am the daughter of a powerful magician. I have lived most of my life on this island. I’ve fallen in love with Ferdinand.

I was once Duke of Milan. I was betrayed by my brother and sent to my death. I survived and have lived on this island ever since, developing my powers.


Worksheet 2: Whose side are they on?





Character

What do we know about them so far?

Who are they loyal to and why? How do you know?

Who might they they
hold grudges against and why?

How do you know?



Prospero










Miranda



She loves her father, Prospero. Almost her first words are ‘my dearest father’.





Ariel










Ferdinand










Caliban

Son of the witch Sycorax. Prospero keeps him as a servant.




He hates Prospero for having taken over his island: ‘This island’s mine …’.

Trinculo










Stephano










Alonso










Sebastian










Gonzalo




He helped Prospero and Miranda. Prospero praises his ‘charity’ and ‘gentleness’.




Antonio










LESSON 2: Act 1 Scene 2

(This lesson has been adapted from Lesson 7 in your pack.)



Learning objective

Understand the events of Act 1 Scene 2, its place in the whole play and how it links with Act 3

Scene 1.

ICT Activity 4

Starter


  • Explain to students that we are focusing on the first SATs scene, Act 1 Scene 2 and that in this scene humour is often derived from situations because audiences recognise traits that are being mimicked or parodied (e.g. Little Britain or Summer Heights High).

  • Use Worksheet 3 (ICT Activity 4 from your pack) and ask students to match up the comments with the characters/roles.

    Introduction



  • Explain to students that this recognition of particular traits or behaviour is one of the reasons why Shakespeare remains popular – people’s personalities haven’t changed that much over the last 400 years!

  • Hand out Worksheet 4, which asks students to anticipate how different people behave in given scenarios. Divide the characters/situations up between the class so that there is a variance of tasks covered; students should complete the second column of the table, ideally in pairs/threes.

  • Ask pairs/threes to link up with another group and share their ideas. If some have particularly good ideas encourage the rest of the class to add these to their sheets.
  • If there is enough time, take feedback to see what students have written.

Development


  • Read the SATs section from Act 1 Scene 2 (lines 376 – 505).

  • Students complete column three on Worksheet 4 by adding suitable quotations from the scene to support the character descriptions and suggested behaviour. This can be done in several ways depending on the ability of the class:

    • More able students work in pairs/threes but try to find more than one good quotation

    • You may wish to complete the activity as a class with students discussing ideas then noting them down (modelled using an ICT/IWB version of the grid)

    • For less able students, you could use the quotation cut-out cards from Worksheet 5.

Plenary


  • Revise what the class has leant by asking them to write down ten words to describe the various emotions and states Shakespeare has addressed in this scene. Some words to prompt the students are: love, hate, innocence, nativity, bully, victim, longing, rebellion, etc.

  • Ask students to think ahead to the next time Miranda and Ferdinand are together (Act 3 Scene 1) and highlight the words from their lists that they think might still be relevant during this scene.





Worksheet 3: That’s so typical…


Match the comment on the left with the person you think is most likely to have said it on the right.


He is allowed to stay out until midnight every night of the week.

No.

I will only take the register when you’re all quiet. That includes you, Kerry and Imogen.

Are you listening to me?

That’s SOOOOOOO unfair.


Order, order, order!

You’re not going out looking like that, young lady.

When are you going to get a haircut?

Mum! She’s still in the bathroom!

I want a biscuit.

You’re so embarrassing!

Sit!

Phwoar! Look at her: she’s gorgeous.

Tickets please!

Does my bum look big in this?

Good evening. This is the 10 o’clock news.

Pet owner to dog

Son to mother

Small child

Train conductor

Newsreader

Parent


Doorman/bouncer

Parent to daughter

Girl to group of friends

Teenager


Parent to son

Teenager


Teacher

Speaker in the House of Commons

Toddler

Teenager to parent



Boy to group of friends








Worksheet 4: Who’s behaving badly?


Character and situation

Possible behaviour

Suitable quotations from Act 1 Scene 3

A father tries to match-make his single daughter to a rich handsome man







A servant performs a task for his master





A son mourns the death of his father







A woman sees a handsome man for the first time







A young man falls in love as soon as he sees a young woman







A woman tries to defend a lover from her father’s accusations







A woman tries to reassure her lover that her father doesn’t mean what he says











Worksheet 5: Quotation cut-out cards



Prospero: Thy false uncle –

Dost thou attend me?



Prospero: … that now he was

The ivy which had hid my princely trunk,

And sucked my verdure out on’t. Thou attend’st not!


Miranda: Your tale, sir, would cure deafness.

Miranda: Alack, for pity.

I, not remembering how I cried out then,

Will cry it o’er again. It is a hint

That wrings mine eyes to’t.



Prospero: Come away, servant, come! I am ready now.

Approach, my Ariel! Come!



Ariel: All hail, great master! Grave sir, hail! I come

To answer thy best pleasure, be’t to fly,

To swim, to dive into the fire, to ride

On the curled clouds.



Prospero: How now? Moody?

What is’t thou canst demand?



Prospero: Thou liest, malignant thing! Hast thou forgot

The foul witch Sycorax, who with age and envy

Was grown into a hoop? Hast thou forgot her?


Prospero: If thou more murmur’st, I will rend an oak,

And peg thee in his knotty entrails, till

Thou hast howled away twelve winters.


Miranda: ’Tis a villain, sir,

I do not love to look on.


Worksheet 5: Quotation cut-out cards continued




Prospero: Come forth I say! There’s other business for thee.

Come, thou tortoise!



Prospero: Thou poisonous slave, got by the devil himself

Upon thy wicked dam, come forth!



Caliban: As wicked dew as e’er my mother brushed

With raven’s feather from unwholesome fen

Drop on you both.

Miranda: Abhorred slave,

Which any print of goodness wilt not take,

Being capable of all ill!


Ferdinand: Most sure, the goddess

On whom these airs attend!



Miranda: Why speaks my father so urgently?

Miranda: There’s nothing ill can dwell in such a temple.

If the ill spirit have so fair a house,

Good things will strive to dwell with’t.


Miranda: O dear father,

Make not too rash a trial of him, for

He’s gentle, and not fearful.


Miranda: Be of comfort.

My father’s of a better nature, sir,

Than he appears by speech. This is unwonted

Which now came from him.




LESSON 3: Act 3 Scene 1

(This lesson has been adapted from Lesson 10 in your pack.)





Learning objective

Understand the events of Act 3 Scene 1, its place in the whole play and how it links with Act 1 Scene 2.

ICT Activity 8

Students will need to have read Act 3 Scene 1 before this lesson.

Starter


  • Ask students to discuss the following in pairs: Do you believe in love at first sight? They should give reasons for their answers.
  • Open up the discussion to the whole class and share responses and reasons. Explore the potential advantages and disadvantages. (For example, it is romantic, it means there is a spark between people, the attraction could be based on looks alone.)


    Introduction



  • Remind students that Ferdinand and Miranda fall in love at first sight and they first show their feelings for one another in Act 3 Scene 1 but hinted at an attraction in Act 1 Scene 2.

  • Ask students to revise work from Lesson 2 and be able to give one example where the couple hinted at an attracting in Act 1 Scene 3.

  • In pairs students should complete the table (task 1) on Worksheet 6 by finding quotations from Act 3 Scene 1 that demonstrate how Miranda and Ferdinand show their feelings for each other. One half of the pair should work on Ferdinand while the other works on Miranda. If students need support finding quotations ask them to complete ICT Activity 8 from your pack.

  • Individually students when summarise (as bullet points) the reasons their character gives for those feelings (task 2); students can share the results with their partner

  • Take feedback from pairs, and examine with the class what these quotations and reasons tell us about Miranda and Ferdinand and their love: Is it wild and passionate love? Is it sweet innocent love? Are they too young and naïve? Is the love requited or unrequited?

Development


  • Write on the board: Compare the two lovers in Act 3 Scene 1.

  • Brainstorm what sort of things should go into this piece of writing and create a class plan on the board that students can copy and add to in their books (e.g. their backgrounds; their situations; what we learnt about them from earlier in the play; feelings for each other; language used; etc.).

  • Consider sentence starters and connectives to be used – modelling how to use them and displaying them on the board if necessary (see also Worksheet 7).


  • Divide the class into pairs an allocate each pair one of the following: their backgrounds; their situations; what we learnt about them from earlier in the play; feelings for each other; language used; any other great ideas stemming from the brainstorm task. Now ask students to write one statement about Ferdinand and one about Miranda, using comparative language.

  • If there is time, pairs can join together with one another and they can re-write their four sentences into one paragraph, further developing their use of comparative language.

Plenary


  • Display and discuss the following (giving reasons and quotations in support):

    • Do you think Prospero would be happy about his daughter’s relationship if they were still in Milan?

    • Do you think Miranda would have fallen for Ferdinand if she had led a normal life in Milan?

    • How well does Prospero know his daughter’s personality?


Worksheet 6: Young love


  1. Find quotations that show Miranda and Ferdinand’s feelings for each other. Write these in the table below. An example has already been given, to start you off.




Miranda

Ferdinand

If you’ll sit down

I’ll bear your logs the while. Pray give me that;

I’ll carry it to the pile.

The mistress which I serve quickens what’s dead


And makes my labours pleasures…


























2 In the space provided, summarise the reasons that Miranda and Ferdinand give for feeling as they do.

Reasons Miranda gives for loving Ferdinand:


Reasons Ferdinand gives for loving Miranda:


Worksheet 7: Comparing young love


Possible sentence starters:



Miranda and Ferdinand start from different places because…


In Act 1 Scene 2 we witness…


Miranda declares that…


Ferdinand states that…


When X says “…” it shows that…


The reasons that X gives…


From language such as “…” it is clear that…


In a similar way…


In a different way…


When X…


However…


In contrast…


Additionally…


To conclude…


etc… add your own!


LESSON 4: A daughter torn


Learning objective

To understand how Act 1 Scene 2 and Act 3 Scene 1 fit together and explore the relationships Miranda has with her father and her boyfriend.

Starter


  • Refresh students’ understanding of the role of daughters in Shakespearean times (refer to Worksheet 8 if necessary; this could even have been a task set as a previous homework).

  • Pairs to discuss the relationship they have with their father or significant male role model and how this has changed over the years. Teachers could start this off themselves by sharing their own thoughts and feelings about the relationship they have with their own father.

  • Students write down ten words to summarise the relationship Miranda and Prospero have. Take feedback and explore what evidence their judgements were formed on.

    Introduction



  • Display the following quotation and model/explain what Prospero is saying and why he says it:

    PROSPERO: Silence! One word more

    Shall make me chide thee, if not hate thee. What,

    An advocate for an imposter? Hush!

    Thou think’st there is no more such shapes as he,

    Having see but him and Caliban? Foolish wench!

    Act 1 Scene 2 lines 560-564



  • Ideas to be explored include:

    • Prospero is speaking roughly to his daughter – he uses lots of!

    • He calls her a ‘foolish wench’ – quite cruel

    • He tells her to be quiet (children to be seen but not heard?) ‘Silence’ and ‘Hush’

    • Does he really expect Miranda to stay quiet?

    • He uses over the top threats – ‘hate thee’ – does he really mean this?

    • Why does he call Ferdinand an ’imposter’? He knows he is who he says he is (although he alone knows that Ferdinand’s father isn’t dead so F isn’t king yet), is it to make himself seem unreasonable in Miranda’s eyes? Why?
    • He says Miranda shouldn’t think him handsome as she only has Caliban to compare him too; should this stop her liking him?


    • Bearing in mind Prospero wants Miranda and Ferdinand to be together, how do you account for these words?

Development


  • Display the following quotation and also give small versions for students to stick into their books – or students may annotate their own copies of the scene if they have them (Act 1 Scene 3 lines 442–444 of Pearson version or lines 511–515 of the version in your pack):

  • In pairs, ask students to identify how these words show Prospero’s layers of love for Miranda (he thinks she is ‘braver’ than him, his desire to see her united with Ferdinand means he won’t use magic on them – ‘control thee’, he is pleased that Miranda and Ferdinand have ‘changed eyes’ – he wants the love to be requited).

  • Students should now annotate their understanding of how these words show Prospero’s layers of love for Miranda onto their quotations.
  • Allocate additional quotations from Worksheet 9 to pairs/threes of students. It is worth trying to allocate as many different quotations as possible amongst the class. It is also worth differentiating the pairs so that more/less able students can work together or give easier quotations to less able students. If working with a Teaching Assistant, discuss the quotation with him/her first so that he/she can confidently support students. Students can also be allocated more than one quotation. The line numbers relate to those in your pack.


  • Ask students to annotate in the same way for:

    • How do the characters express love for one another?

    • How can the relationships between the characters be summarised?

    • How does key vocabulary reveal layers of meaning?

    • Do characters say what they mean? Why? Why not?

Plenary


  • Display a number of quotations that the students have been working on and ask students to explain to the rest of the class what the quotation explores and what we learn about Prospero.

  • On a picture of Prospero (or a symbolic version of him) on the board, ask students to stick post-it notes with phrases about Prospero in these scenes; either use different colours of notes for different aspects of his personality or place in different sectors around his image – it would be a good idea to keep this as a permanent display that can be added to if need be for the duration of study.


Worksheet 8: Prospero’s aside





    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.




    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.

    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.





    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.


    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.




    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.


    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.




    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.


    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.




    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.

    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.




    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.


    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight

    They have changed eyes.




    PROSPERO: (Aside) The Duke of Milan

    And his more braver daughter could control thee,

    If now ‘twere fit to do’t. At the first sight



    They have changed eyes.


Worksheet 9: Love bites



Read through the quotations below and answer the following questions.


  • How do the characters express love for one another?

  • How can the relationships between the characters be summarised?

  • How does key vocabulary reveal layers of meaning?

  • Do characters say what they mean? Why? Why not?


MIRANDA


Act 1 Scene 2

lines 484-486

I might call him

A thing divine, for nothing natural

I ever saw so noble.

FERDINAND


Act 1 Scene 2

lines 490–492


Most sure, the goddess

On whom these airs attend! Vouchsafe my prayer

May know if you remain upon this island;


MIRANDA


Act 1 Scene 2

lines 518–521


Why speaks my father so urgently? This

Is the third man that e’er I saw, the first

That e’er I sighed for. Pity move my father

To be inclined my way!


FERDINAND


Act 1 Scene 2

lines 522–524


O, if a virgin,

And your affection not gone forth, I’ll make you

The Queen of Naples.


PROSPERO (aside)


Act 1 Scene 2

lines 526–528


They are both in each other’s powers; but this swift business

I must make uneasy, lest too light winning

Make the prize light.





Worksheet 9: Love bites (continued)


MIRANDA

Act 1 Scene 2

lines 547–549

O dear father,

Make not too rash a trail of him, for

He’s gentle and not fearful.


FERDINAND


Act 3 Scene 1

lines 30–32


I’d rather crack my sinews, break my back,

Than should such honour undergo,

While I lazy sit by.


PROSPERO (aside)


Act 3 Scene1

lines 37–38


Poor worm, thou art infected!

This visitation shows it.


FERDINAND


Act 3 Scene 1

lines 82–85


If hollowly, invent

What best is boded me to mischief! I,

Beyond all limit of what else i’ the world

Do love, prize, honour you.


PROSPERO (aside)


Act 3 Scene1

lines 88–90


Fair encounter

Of two most rare affections! Heavens rains grace

On that which breeds between ‘em!


MIRANDA


Act 3 Scene1

lines 98–101

I am your wife, if you will marry me;

If not, I’ll die your maid; to be your fellow

You may deny me, but I’ll be your servant,

Whether you will or no.






Teachit KS3 Interactive Pack © HarperCollins Publishers and Teachit (UK) Ltd 2008. This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom.



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