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TTL 101


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Introduction

The Introduction to Trucking and Logistics course is designed to help you, the warehouse or driver employee learn about the industry, your career opportunities, your federal and state requirements along with understanding the vehicle you will be driving and important safety elements.

The trucking and logistics industry is an exciting place to be right now. The need for drivers is on the rise now and in the future. In this course, you will learn what it takes to be a successful driver and your many career opportunities.


Class Outcomes

By the end of this class, you will be able to:


  1. Describe the knowledge and skills necessary to operate a commercial vehicle safely.




  1. Understands the logistics industry.




  1. Describe the tasks and duties required of an entry-level trucker and warehouse worker.




  1. Show the range of skill mastery required by an individual driver.




  1. Understands warehouse and loading dock safety.





Introductions


Individually complete the following questions.

  1. Who are you and how long have you been with the company?



  1. Why do you want to be in the trucking and logistics industry?



  1. What do the brochures and documents tell you about the need for professionals in the trucking and logistics field?



  1. What is your current level of experience?



  1. What do you want from the class?



  1. What will you contribute to the learning process? (Examples include humor, stories, experiences, etc.).

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Trucking and Logistics Industry

The Trucking and Logistics Industry is an exciting place to be right now. There is a great history that goes along with this industry as well as a great future. The following information outlines four key areas for consideration as a newcomer into this field.


  1. History of the Trucking and Logistics Industry

  2. Jobs in the Trucking and Logistics Industry

  3. Advances in the Trucking and Logistics Industry

  4. Your future in the Trucking and Logistics Industry




History of the T & L Industry

Construction of the nation’s first transcontinental highway, the Lincoln Highway (U.S. 30), started in 1912. It took 20 years to complete the 3385-mile road between New York City and San Francisco. In 1956, the Federal Aid Highway Act was signed into law, authorizing the 41,000-mile National System of interstate and defense highways to be completed by 1972.

In 1986, more than 97% of the interstate highway system was open to traffic as the program entered its 30th year. Currently, there are over 44,700 miles of interstate highways with 132,000 miles of other arteries in the United States.

In the early 1980’s, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) determined that a need existed for technical guidance in the area of truck driver training. In 1985, the FHWA developed the Model Curriculum training for tractor-trailer drivers. This material includes the minimum standards for training for tractor trailer drivers.

The Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 was intended to improve highway safety. Its goal was to ensure that drivers of large trucks and buses possess the knowledge and skills necessary to operate these vehicles safely on public highways. This act established the commercial driver’s license (CDL) program and directed the agency to establish minimum Federal standards that states must meet when licensing drivers.

In 1990, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) recommended to FHWA that drivers of specialized vehicles, including multiple-trailer vehicles, receive training in the special handling characteristics and other variables that influence the controllability and maneuverability of these vehicles.

Eighty percent of all U.S. communities rely exclusively on trucks to deliver their products and goods. This means that trucks carry over 70% of all domestic freight tonnage or nearly 11 billion tons annually. There are approximately 3 million truck drivers across the United States.

The trucking industry includes companies engaged in motor freight trucking and warehousing. These include areas such as local and long distance trucking or transfer services, establishments engaged in the storage of farm products, furniture and other household goods, or commercial goods of any kind. This also includes the operation of terminal facilities for handling freight, both with and without maintenance facilities.


  • Local and long distance trucking without storage

  • Local and long distance trucking with storage

  • Courier and moving services

  • Farm product warehousing and storage

  • Refrigerated warehousing and storage

  • General warehousing and storage

  • Special warehousing and storage

  • Terminal and joint terminal maintenance facilities for motor freight transportation

The trucking and warehouse industry is subject to government regulations which ensure safety for everyone. Throughout this class, you will learn the various safety regulations required to be safe. The following terms will also be discussed:

Interstate – if you are crossing state lines or furthering interstate commerce, you are considered to be involved in interstate operations.

Intrastate – if you are not crossing state lines (staying within a state’s borders) and not furthering interstate commerce, you are considered to be involved in intrastate operations.

The Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) oversees motor carrier safety. Motor carriers and drivers operating in interstate commerce must comply with the agency’s regulations, commonly referred to as the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs).



The following safety rules and standards are clearly outlined by the FMCSR. However, please note that some states vary in its adoption of these regulations so you must also be familiar with your state compliance rules.

  • Hours of service

  • Driver qualification

  • Driver disqualification

  • Physical qualification
  • Drug and alcohol testing


  • Commercial driver’s license (CDL) standards

  • Vehicle parts and accessories

  • Vehicle inspection

The trucking industry is a leader in safety and security. According to the American Trucking Association’s (ATA) 2007 Facts for Drivers, the rate of fatal truck crashes dropped 29% between 1993 and 2003. Between 2004 and 2005, the drop was another 1.7%.

Trucking Organizations

  1. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Ensure responsibility for ensuring that America’s roads and highways continue to be the safest and most technologically up-to-date.

  2. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), established in 1970, provides education, research, safety standards, and enforcement activity for the purpose of saving lives, preventing injuries and reducing economic costs due to road traffic crashes.

  3. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), created in 2000 pursuant to the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999, administers the former MCSR now known as the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR).

  4. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA)’s Office of Hazardous Materials Safety. To provide DOT a more focused research organization and establish a separate operating administration for pipeline and hazardous materials transportation safety operations.

  5. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) focuses on clean air. Current focus is on Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel.
  6. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the federal agency under the Department of Homeland Security responsible for protecting the nation’s transportation system.





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