This week’s date here Weekly Class News From the first grade classroom of Miss Frizzle

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This week’s date here

Weekly Class News

From the first grade classroom of Miss Frizzle

Highlights


Subhead: new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news. new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news. new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news. new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news. new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news. new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news.




M

Tu

W

Th

Fr

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum


Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum

Field trip to museum



More news


  • Subhead: new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news.

  • Subhead: new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news.

  • Subhead: new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news.

  • Subhead: new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news.

  • Subhead: new copy here. Just replace this stand-in copy for your class news.




Weekly Class News Clip Art
Instructions: just copy and paste any of these graphics into the two editable graphics boxes on the template. Or add your own graphics!




























Reading Tips from Reading Rockets

Instructions: Just copy and paste any of these tips into the editable “Reading tip of the week” copy block at the bottom of the newsletter template.
Read me a story! Whether snuggled under the covers with peanut-butter sandwiches, or following along with a book on tape while on a road trip, reading together is a powerful tool in motivating your child to read.
Keep it fun, for everyone. Keep your kids involved by asking questions about the story, and let them fill in the blanks. You can also create activities related to the stories you're reading.
Look at what I did!” Keeping a chart or graph that illustrates the number of books a child has read can bring a sense of accomplishment.
Spice up your reading log. Choose a theme that goes along with your child's interests, for example: a Reading Olympics, where the child “goes for the gold” by reading a certain number of books.
Spice up your reading log. Create a bingo card or passport where each space can be filled in by reading a mystery book, or a piece of non-fiction.
I want that one!” Reading should be a choice, not a chore. Make sure there are a variety of books, magazines, and other materials available for your child to choose from.
Something to talk about. Reading doesn’t have to stop when you put the book down. Talk to your child about books you’ve read and books you think he or she might enjoy.
Write a fan letter. If your child has a favorite author, help your child write a letter to send to the publisher, who’ll send it along.
Start a book club. If your child likes structure and doing everything with friends, consider joining or starting a parent/child book club.
Make time for reading. Carve time out of the busy day and dedicate it to reading, both together and on your own.

Encourage your child to read another one. Find ways to encourage your child to keep reading. If he or she likes one book, find another book with a similar subject or by the same author.

Take turns reading. Once your child can read, have him or her read aloud to you every day. You can take turns – you read one page and your child the next.
Turn on the closed captioning on your TV. When watching a TV show with your child, try turning on the closed captioning channel. This shows the words the characters are speaking on the television screen.
Find reasons for your child to write. As your child gets more comfortable with writing, try to think of reasons to write – ask him or her to write the grocery list, thank-you notes, or birthday cards.
Don’t worry about spelling mistakes. When your child is first learning to write, it doesn't matter if he or she makes spelling mistakes.
Make a writing kit. Find a box or basket and fill it with paper, crayons, books, pens, and pencils. Have your child add things to the box.
Use a children’s dictionary. Show your child how to use it to look up the meaning of words.
Hear the words. If you have access to the Internet, show your child how to find a talking dictionary to hear how a word is pronounced (in English).
Tell stories. Tell your child a story you already know – or just make one up! It could be a folk tale, stories about your family, funny stories, or any story you both like.
Talk about books. Retell exciting stories at the dinner table. Encourage your child to share his favorite parts.
Write for a purpose. As you're writing your grocery list or a thank you note, share your work with your child. Don't be surprised if she asks to borrow the pencil!
Talk about punctuation. Explain that punctuation is a way to show how we talk. You can say, for example, "When we talk, we usually pause a little bit at the end of a sentence. The way we show this in writing is to use a period."

Play with your child's name. Play around with the sounds in your child's name. Ask him or her to say words that begin with the same sound – like José, jugar, jabón.

Say tongue twisters. Tongue twisters are a fun way to practice sounds.

Let your child tell you the story. Many children memorize stories they've heard many times. Let your child take a turn "reading" the book to you.


Read it again and again. Your child may want to hear a favorite story over and over. Go ahead and read the same book for the 100th time! This is beneficial for your child.
For parents of preschoolers:

Read together every day. Read to your child every day. Make this a warm and loving time when the two of you can cuddle close.
Give everything a name. Build your child’s vocabulary by talking about interesting words and objects. For example, “Look at that airplane! Those are the wings of the plane. Why do you think they are called wings?”
Say how much you enjoy reading. Tell your child how much you enjoy reading with him or her. Talk about “story time” as the favorite part of your day.
Read with fun in your voice. Read to your child with humor and expression. Use different voices. Ham it up!
Know when to stop. Put the book away for awhile if your child loses interest or is having trouble paying attention.
Be interactive. Discuss what’s happening in the book, point out things on the page, and ask questions.
Read it again and again. Go ahead and read your child’s favorite book for the 100th time!
Talk about writing, too. Mention to your child how we read from left to right and how words are separated by spaces.
Point out print everywhere. Talk about the written words you see in the world around you. Ask your child to find a new word on each outing.

Get your child evaluated. Please be sure to see your child’s pediatrician or teacher as soon as possible if you have concerns about your child’s language.

Sing an alphabet song. Sing an alphabet song with your child so he or she will learn the names of the letters.
Buy or make alphabet letters. There are refrigerator magnets and puzzles you can buy that are in the shape of the letters A to Z. Or you can draw and cut out the letters on strong paper.
Show your child the parts of a book. Look at the cover of the book. Talk about what the book might be about. Look at the page numbers. Tell your child who the author is and who the illustrator is.
Show how we read words on a page. Point out how we read words on a page from left to right and from top to bottom. Explain that words are separated by spaces.
Say rhymes. Rhymes are fun to listen to and they help your child hear the different sounds in words.
Sing songs. Children love to hear people sing. Songs have rhymes and rhythms that help them learn.
For parents of kindergarteners:

Talk to your child. Ask your child to talk about his day at school. Encourage him to explain something they did, or a game he played during recess.
Say silly tongue twisters. Sing songs, read rhyming books, and say silly tongue twisters. These help kids become sensitive to the sounds in words.
Read it and experience it. Connect what your child reads with what happens in life. If reading a book about animals, relate it to your last trip to the zoo.
Use your child’s name. Point out the link between letters and sounds. Say, “John, the word jump begins with the same sound as your name. John, jump. And they both begin with the same letter, J.”
Play with puppets. Play language games with puppets. Have the puppet say, “My name is Mark. I like words that rhyme with my name. Does park rhyme with Mark? Does ball rhyme with Mark?”

Trace and say letters. Have your child use a finger to trace a letter while saying the letter's sound. Do this on paper, in sand, or on a plate of sugar.

Write it down. Have paper and pencils available for your child to use for writing. Working together, write a sentence or two about something special. Encourage your child to use the letters and sounds he or she is learning about in school.
Play sound games. Practice blending sounds into words. Ask “Can you guess what this word is? m - o - p.” Hold each sound longer than normal.
Read it again and again. Go ahead and read your child’s favorite book for the 100th time! As you read, pause and ask your child about what is going on in the book.
Talk about letters and sounds. Help your child learn the names of the letters and the sounds the letters make. Turn it into a game! “I’m thinking of a letter and it makes the sound mmmmmm.”
For parents of first graders:

Don’t leave home without it. Bring along a book or magazine any time your child has to wait, such as at a doctor’s office. Always try to fit in reading!
Once is not enough. Encourage your child to re-read favorite books and poems. Re-reading helps kids read more quickly and accurately.
Dig deeper into the story. Ask your child questions about the story you've just read. Say something like, “Why do you think Clifford did that?”
Take control of the television. It’s difficult for reading to compete with TV and video games. Encourage reading as a free-time activity.
Be patient. When your child is trying to sound out an unfamiliar word, give him or her time to do so. Remind your child to look closely at the first letter or letters of the word.
Pick books that are at the right level. Help your child pick books that are not too difficult. The aim is to give your child lots of successful reading experiences.

Play word games. Have your child sound out the word as you change it from mat
to fat to sat; from sat to sag to sap; and from sap to sip.

I read to you, you read to me. Take turns reading aloud at bedtime. Kids enjoy this special time with their parents.
Gently correct your young reader. When your child makes a mistake, gently point out the letters he or she overlooked or read incorrectly. Many beginning readers will guess wildly at a word based on its first letter.
Talk, talk, talk! Talk with your child every day about school and things going on around the house. Sprinkle some interesting words into the conversation, and build on words you’ve talked about in the past.
Write, write, write! Ask your child to help you write out the grocery list, a thank you note to Grandma, or to keep a journal of special things that happen at home.
For parents of second graders:

Create a writing toolbox. Fill a box with drawing and writing materials. Find opportunities for your child to write, such as the shopping list, thank you notes, or birthday cards.
Be your child’s #1 fan. Ask your child to read aloud what he or she has written for school. Be an enthusiastic listener.
One more time with feeling. When your child has sounded out an unfamiliar word, have him or her re-read that sentence. Often kids are so busy figuring out a word they lose the meaning of what they’ve just read.
Invite an author to class. Ask an author to talk to your child’s class about the writing process. Young children often think they aren’t smart enough if they can’t sit down and write a perfect story on the first try.
Create a book together. Fold pieces of paper in half and staple them to make a book. Ask your child to write sentences on each page and add his or her own illustrations.
Do storytelling on the go. Take turns adding to a story the two of you make up while riding in a car or bus. Try making the story funny or spooky.

Point out the relationship between words. Explain how related words have similar spellings and meanings. Show how a word like knowledge, for example, relates to a word like know.

Use a writing checklist. Have your child create a writing checklist with reminders such as, “Do all of my sentences start with a capital? Yes/No.”
Quick, quick. Use new words your child has learned in lively flash card or computer drills. Sometimes these help kids automatically recognize and read words, especially those that are used frequently.
For parents of third graders:

Make books special. Turn reading into something special. Take your kids to the library, help them get their own library card, read with them, and buy them books as gifts. Have a favorite place for books in your home or, even better, put books everywhere.
Get them to read another one. Find ways to encourage your child to pick up another book. Introduce him or her to a series like The Boxcar Children
or Harry Potter or to a second book by a favorite author, or ask the librarian for additional suggestions.
Crack open the dictionary. Let your child see you use a dictionary. Say, “Hmm, I’m not sure what that word means… I think I’ll look it up.”
Talk about what you see and do. Talk about everyday activities to build your child’s background knowledge, which is crucial to listening and reading comprehension. Keep up a running patter, for example, while cooking together, visiting somewhere new, or after watching a TV show.
First drafts are rough. Encourage your child when writing. Remind him or her that writing involves several steps. No one does it perfectly the first time.
Different strokes for different folks. Read different types of books to expose your child to different types of writing. Some kids, especially boys, prefer nonfiction books.

Teach your child some “mind tricks”. Show your child how to summarize a story in a few sentences or how to make predictions about what might happen next. Both strategies help a child comprehend and remember.
Are we there yet?” Use the time spent in the car or bus for wordplay. Talk about how jam means something you put on toast as well as cars stuck in traffic. How many other homonyms can your child think of? When kids are highly familiar with the meaning of a word, they have less difficulty reading it.


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