To do this you could: Sing/play these rhymes (or any others) with your child. Example 1



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Curriculum: Developing emotional and imaginative development through oral language. The child should be enabled to listen to, learn and recite rhymes, including nonsense rhymes.
To do this you could:
Sing/play these rhymes (or any others) with your child.

Example 1:


If you’re happy and you know it
Clap your hands (clap your hands twice)

If you’re happy and you know it

Clap your hands (clap your hands twice)

If you’re happy and you know it

And you really want to show it
If you’re happy and you know it
Clap your hands (clap your hands twice)


If you’re happy and you know it

Pat your cheeks (pat your cheeks twice)

If you’re happy and you know it

Pat your cheeks (pat your cheeks twice)

If you’re happy and you know it

And you really want to show it

If you’re happy and you know it

Pat your cheeks (pat your cheeks twice)
If you’re happy and you know it

Stamp your feet (stamp your feet twice)

If you’re happy and you know it


Stamp your feet (stamp your feet twice)

If you’re happy and you know it

And you really want to show it

If you’re happy and you know it

Stamp your feet (stamp feet twice)
If you’re happy and you know it

Say hurrah (say hurrah twice)

If you’re happy and you know it

Say hurrah (say hurrah twice)

If you’re happy and you know it

And you really want to show it

If you’re happy and you know it

Say hurrah (say hurrah twice)
Final Verse

If you’re happy and you know it

Clap your hands, pat your cheeks, stamp your feet, say hurrah

If you’re happy and you know it

Clap your hands, pat your cheeks, stamp your feet, say hurrah

If you’re happy and you know it

And you really want to show it

If you’re happy and you know it



Clap your hands, pat your cheeks, stamp your feet, say hurrah






Example 2:

One, Two
I go to school
Three, Four
I play outdoor
Five, Six
I read my books
Seven, Eight

I am never late

Nine, Ten
I sleep by then.


Example 3:

The dog says bow, wow
The cat says meow
The sheep says baa-baa
The little pig says wee-wee
The frog says croak-croak
The hen says cluck-cluck
The cock says cock-a-doodle-doo.




Curriculum: Developing cognitive abilities through oral language, the child should be enabled to ask questions that will satisfy his/her curiosity and wonder: Who? What? Where? When? How? What if?
You could try playing this game with your child:
GAME; WHO AM I?
This game can be played in any setting indoors or outdoors while driving etc
Objective of the game is to guess who the player is
Player 1 thinks of a person everybody in the group knows. It could be a famous person (e.g. the president) or somebody who is known to the group as a whole (e.g. the girl next door). The child now assumes the role of this character.
Each of the other players takes a turn to ask a question such as “What colour is your hair?”
Note, you can make it more difficult for older children by having questions where the answer must be Yes or No, for example: Are you a man? Are you an animal? Are you a film star?
This continues until somebody guesses who player 1 is.




Curriculum: Developing competence and confidence in using oral language, the child should be enabled to play antonym and synonym games.
You could try playing these Antonym and synonym games with your child:
Synonyms are words which have a similar meaning, like clever and smart or big and large.
Ask your child to match the following words

Angry friend

Trip mad

Pal voyage

Sugary rock

Stone stole

Toss sweet

Took throw

Enjoy like

Flame fast

Quick fire
OTHER IDEAS FOR SYNONYMS
You could also play this game using a simple story book e.g. “The 3 Little Pigs”

Replace existing words with words of a similar meaning


Little/tiny, build/construct, sticks/twigs, big/large, house/home etc
ANTONYMS
Antonyms are words which have opposite meanings. You will require a list of words for this exercise;
Match the following list of words with their closest opposite

Give ugly

Walk dry

Happy take

Pretty sad

Dark light

Noisy quiet

Wet run





Curriculum: Developing receptiveness to oral language, the child should be enabled to listen to radio broadcasts and discuss what has been learned.

You could do this with your child on a regular basis.

You could ask your child questions about the main points in the broadcast and see if they can summarise them.

Curriculum: Developing receptiveness to oral language, the child should be enabled to follow detailed instructions or directions from others in order to test their accuracy.
You could ask your child to:
Follow detailed directions to (for example) a friend’s house

Curriculum: Developing emotional and imaginative life through oral language, the child should be enabled to discuss plays, films and television programmes.
You could watch a television programme with your child and discuss it under the following headings:
Characters
Plot
Storylines
Costumes
Use of accents
Use of music etc




In the reading element of the literacy curriculum parents also have a very important role to play. From the very first time you pick up a book with your child you are setting them on the road to discovery of a whole new world. It is important that children of this age enjoy books and reading.




Curriculum: Receptiveness to language – developing concepts of language and print, the child should be enabled to become an active listener through the development of a range of listening activities based on stories read or told.
This can be supported by:
Telling and retelling a story in sequence

Curriculum: Receptiveness to language – developing concepts of language and print, the child could be enabled to play with language to develop an awareness of sounds

You could support this at home by doing action songs with your child.
Like incey-wincey spider.


Curriculum: Receptiveness to language – developing concepts of language and print, to develop a sense of rhythm and rhyme
You could support this by:
Play rhyming games with words that you are reading in the book.
Parent says a word e.g. cat and the child has to find words that rhyme with cat.





Curriculum: Receptiveness to language – developing reading strategies, the child should be enabled to visit the school library and the local library.
To do this you could:
Take your child to the local library and help them to join.
You could also ensure that you and your child visit the library regularly together and both choose and take home books.
One important way of teaching children is by modelling behaviour.
Children will enjoy sharing this activity with you.




Curriculum: Developing cognitive abilities through language – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think through reading. The child should be enabled to keep a record of his/her reading in various forms.
To do this you could:
Encourage your child to read and support this development by introducing new activities along the way.

Helping your child keep a record of what they read can be a way of doing this.

This record can be kept in a folder or in a book, kept especially for this purpose.
The record can be as simple as keeping a list of all books that your child has read or it can be a more detailed review of each book read.






Curriculum: Developing cognitive abilities through language – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think through reading. The child should be enabled to listen to, read, learn, recite and respond to a challenging range of poetry.
To do this you could:
Find a poem that your child likes.
Your child then can learn the poem and recite the poem to a small group of friends/family giving a short explanation to the group why they liked the poem and what they think it meant.





Curriculum: Receptiveness to language – creating and fostering the impulse to write states the child should be enabled to see their personal writing displayed
To do this you could:
Turn your child’s writing into books: paste their drawings and writings on pieces of construction paper.
For each book, make a cover out of heavier paper or cardboard, and add special art, a title, and their name as author, better yet get them to do this or help them do this.

Punch holes in the pages and cover and bind the book with thread/wool/ whatever you have that works.



Curriculum: (a) Receptiveness to language – creating and fostering the impulse to write states the child should be enabled to read personal writing aloud and hear it read.

(b) Emotional and imaginative development through language – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing.


To do this you could:
Use story starters instead of reading your child a story; you tell your child that you want their help to tell you a story instead.
If your child can’t write yet, offer to write down what they tell you. You might have to help a little with the story telling too. This helps your child build reading and writing skills by creating stories.
Ask your child to choose a picture (can be downloaded from a FREE online Story Starters Collection http://www.meddybemps.com/9.700.html) the picture then forms the basis for the story.
You can also take it in turns to write a story, you do one sentence and your child can do the next and so on.
Keep all the stories in a binder.




Curriculum: Developing cognitive abilities through language – clarifying thought through writing, the child should be enabled to write the significant details about an event or activity.
To do this your child could
Make an Acrostic Birthday poem/story (An acrostic poem takes a word, sentence, or phrase and makes the first letter of each the first line of a poem/story, better explained below)
What you need:


  • Decorative scrapbook paper

  • Pen

  • Stickers, bits of wrapping paper, anything decorative
  • A plastic sleeve (optional)


  • A binder

Your child can write the full date of their birthday vertically on the paper, see below.



Then your child can use the first letter or number of each line to begin a comment about a specific birthday memory.
candles on my cake
fun day

nder the wrapping paper, a new soccer ball!

reat chocolate cake

ncle Bob can really kick

unny weather

ried to score a goal, but Uncle Bob saved it
blows to get all the candles out

drops of rain

piece of cake left

more presents left to open
Your child can decorate the page with whatever you have found and some drawings that they like.
Put the finished page in a plastic sleeve and put in a binder.
Throughout the year, the child can create a page for each family member and add to the binder.


Curriculum: Competence and confidence in using language – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently. The child should be enabled to use a range of aids and strategies, including the use of approximate spelling, to improve his/her command of spelling
You could try this with your child:
Word search games like Boggle or ‘Wordsmith;’ pick a phrase e.g. “Saint Patrick’s Day” and see how many words your child can find using the letters in these words.
Set a timer for 3 minutes and see who can come up with the most words!
If there is any doubt about a particular word, let your child check the word in a dictionary to see if it really exists.
Words with 3 or 4 letters are worth 1 point, words with 5 letters or more are worth 2 points.





Curriculum: Emotional and imaginative development through language – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing, the child should be enabled to keep a personal diary.
To do this your child could:
Keep a Diary/Journal; this is excellent writing practice as well as a good opportunity for your child to express their feelings.
Your child may like to write about things that happen at home and school, about their friends, things they want to remember and things they would like to do.
You could encourage your child to write about personal feelings.
Your child may want to share their diary with you, if they do read the entries with them and discuss them (if they don’t want to share their diary accept this, it is theirs).

Or you could you do this with your child:

Keep a diary for fun summer activities.


  • Get your child and yourself a notebook/journal (one each).

  • Decorate the notebooks using whatever stickers, markers, pencils etc you have.

  • Explain to your child that this is their summer journal and you have one too.

  • Write in your journals about different things you do or that happen during the summer.

  • Add stories, poems, photographs, pictures, stickers etc.

  • Decide on a schedule with your child (this works best with children’s writing activities, so they know what to expect. Will you write every day? Three times a week? Stick to the schedule, and show your child that writing is as important as the other summer activities).

  • Start writing together (when starting out your child might be a reluctant writer, you might have to work on journal entries together).

  • You could write the same first sentence about a particular day, for example a day at the beach. Ask your child what do they remember about the day, what was the most fun. Encourage them to write these feelings and thoughts about the day, while your write your own.

The important thing about children’s writing activities is to make them fun. Show your excitement, even if your child is reluctant at first. Your enthusiasm and good attitude during the journal writing time will encourage your child to have fun with this summer writing activity.







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