Tropical Rainforest imax

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Tropical Rainforest IMAX

Movie Script 2

1. Main Title Sequence 2

2. The Story’s Beginning / An Ancient Forest 2

3. The Tropical Forest Has Evolved 2

4. Creatures of the Forest 2

5. Rain / Constant Wetness in the Forest 2

6. Sunlight to Darkness 3

7. Biological Diversity 4

8. A Jump Forward in Time 5

9. Forests of the World 5

10. Birds Populate and Pollinate the Forest 5

11. The First Inkling of Primates 6

12. The Forest Renews Itself 6

13. The Interdependence of Forest Organisms 7

14. Primates Come to the Forest 7

15. Tree Logging / Human Tools 8

16. The World Rainforest / News (CNN - Tropics in Trouble) 8

17. Humans Mining The Tropics 8

18. Looking Closely At The Forest 9

19. Seeing the Forest From Another View 10

20. The Race to Learn About the Rainforest 11

21. Traveling Towards the Future (Music: “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”) 11

Jeopardy Questions 13

Science Vocabulary In Script 16

Science Vocabulary Added 17

Tropical Rain Forest IMAX Crossword Puzzle 19

Words and clues submitted to Puzzlemaker at DiscoveryEducation.com 22

Tropical Rain forest IMAX Student Worksheet 24

20. The Race to Learn About the Rainforest 25

Movie Script

1. Main Title Sequence


What is a rain forest?

Answer: a tropical woodland with high annual rainfall (2 words)

2. The Story’s Beginning / An Ancient Forest


Imagine …

we’re travelers in time.

It’s now 400 million years ago.

Some of the most primitive of plants, the ferns

cover almost all the land.

And now, a hundred million years have passed. (300 million years ago)

The dominance of ferns is ending

and the trees with different leaves

and trunks and spreading branches

are beginning to appear.

We have burst upon a new fantastic era --

tropical rain forests have begun.


3. The Tropical Forest Has Evolved


Imagine now … it’s 60 million years ago.

The dinosaurs have come and gone.

The insects who were here before, still thrive.

The forest is a tangled weave of plants

competing for the nutrients and light.

4. Creatures of the Forest


Multitudes of life-forms are emerging.

Static life -- the fungi, plants and trees --

support a mobile world --

the insects and the rest, who move about in search of food.



What is locomotion?

Answer: the process by which an organism moves

5. Rain / Constant Wetness in the Forest


In the morning, moist and sun-warmed air starts rising

prelude to the midday clouds

and every afternoon the rain descends

as tropical rain forests ‘round the planet

live up to their hot and humid name.

What is humidity?

Answer: the amount of water vapor in the air Note: water vapor is a colorless, odorless gas – not droplets of water.

What is condensation?

Answer: the process in which rising warm air cools and condenses, causing water vapor to change to dew

What are condensation nuclei?

Answer: Solid particles suspended in the air, such as dust and smoke, provide surfaces for dew and water droplets to form on. Clouds are made of a great many of these tiny droplets.

What is dew point?

Answer: In the process of condensation, water vapor changes to dew when it cools to its dew point.

Every day since time on Earth began,

the sun has traced a beam of energy and heat – a band --

around the Earth’s equator.

What is the main factor affecting a region’s weather patterns?

Answer: latitude

And so, the daily dose of sun and water

keeps the tropic landscape nourished,

slowly shaping, changing every form of life.

And still, there’s 50 million years or more to go

before the early humans come.

6. Sunlight to Darkness


Coming out to taste the air,

the forest creatures of the night

are just as varied and as numerous as those of day.

What does nocturnal mean?

Answer: animals that are active at night

At dawn, the 12 hours night becomes another 12 of day.

There are no seasonal extremes,

Cycles of only light and darkness,

rain and sunshine,

week by week,

and month on month,

from year to hundred-millionth year.

7. Biological Diversity


Within this cycle grows the largest single living thing

the land has ever seen …

the tree, the very fabric of the forest.

Many times the size of dinosaurs

that trampled around their roots many years ago,

the trees are part of the variety

of many thousand different flowering plants.

But why so many shapes and colors?

How did they arrive at such complexity?

Many creatures blend in with their backgrounds.

How did they acquire this camouflage?

What is camouflage?

Answer: hiding or disguising by changing appearance

Every complicated organism

has its origin in something simpler.

Every form of life has ancestors

that were among the earliest on earth.



What is the Theory of Evolution?

Answer: the idea that life began with very primitive life forms that have, over time, changed into all the different types of organisms on Earth today


Each individual is, by random chance,

just marginally different from its parents.



What is a trait?

Answer: characteristics often shared by family members

What is a mutation?

Answer: a genetic change that occurs that makes a species more likely to survive in a given environment

Just occasionally

the variations prove a slight advantage for survival.



What is an adaptation?

Answer: a genetic change that occurs that makes a species more likely to survive in a given environment

Under evolutionary pressure,

those with an advantage tend to thrive,

while other lines die out.

What is natural selection?

Answer: Individuals with traits better adapted to the environment are more likely to survive and reproduce, thereby passing on the more successful traits.

They don’t’ succeed.

And after millions of generations,

minute alterations, step-by-step, emerge

and, so much time on evolution’s path,

that life is able to perform what seems like magic

as an everyday event.

All of evolution works this way.

8. A Jump Forward in Time


Now, it’s 20 million years ago.

The number and variety of species is increasing rapidly

and filling every nook and cranny in the forest.

9. Forests of the World


Land which one day will be given names

like Borneo, Sumatra, Java,

Queensland, Thailand, Burma,

India, Madagascar, Congo,

Cameroon, the Amazon,

the Central Isthmus of America --

they all are covered by this luscious forest.

Where are the tropical rain forests on the Earth?

Answer: Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Queensland, Thailand, Burma, India, Madagascar, Congo, Cameroon, the Amazon, the Central Isthmus of America

10. Birds Populate and Pollinate the Forest


Diversity, if undisturbed by major changes

leads to more diversity.

Birds, related to the dinosaurs,

diversify to many shapes and sizes,

feeding off the different fruits and flowers,

and spreading seeds and pollen across the forests.



What is pollen?

Answer: a fine, yellowish powder made of tiny grains that contain the male sex cells in plants

What is pollination?

Answer: the transfer of pollen to the sticky pad at the top of the pistil (stigma)

11. The First Inkling of Primates

The age of mammals has arrived.

The only mammals that can fly are bats …

which by locating echoes, see with sound.

What is echo location?

Answer: a process for locating distant objects by means of sound waves reflected back to the sender from the objects

The lemurs, relatives of early primates,

look around the twilight world with large and ghostly eyes.


12. The Forest Renews Itself


By hour, by day, by decade, year and century,

time, it rolls inexorably on.

Individual trees may live 100 years or more

and then will fall or die.



What is photosynthesis?

Answer: the process by which plants that contain chlorophyll make oxygen and their food

What are the raw materials used by green plants for photosynthesis?

Answer: carbon dioxide in the air, light and water

The toppling giant leaves will leave a gaping hole

which plants and younger trees will rush to fill.

The energy contained within the fabric of trees

is never lost or wasted.

Termites quickly go to work

and soon the forest floor reclaims what it supplied

as everything recycles through the system.

What is the term for organisms that break down dead plants and animal wastes?

Answer: decomposers


The new trees race to fill the gap.

Within a year or so

the surface of the woven canopy has been restored.

What is a canopy?

Answer: the uppermost spreading layer of a forest

Everything is used, and used again.

13. The Interdependence of Forest Organisms


The need for food and space for living

leads to complicated patterns of behavior.

Time and circumstances lead one type of ant

to harvest leaves as food for fungus.



What is the term for an organism that feeds on only plants?

Answer: herbivore

As it grows, the fungus breaks the true leaves down,

converting it to food for ants.

Such intimate relationships are frail,

and one cannot exist without the other.



What is mutualism?

Answer: a relationship in which both species benefit from the other’s presence

Symbiotic harmony like this is found across the forest --

while one species may rely on others for survival,

all of them rely upon the trees.

What does environment mean?

Answer: all of the external conditions affecting the life, development and survival of an organism


What is a community?

Answer: all the organisms living together in one environment

14. Primates Come to the Forest


And now, we have reached 2 million years ago.

The monkeys, apes, and other agile primates

have evolved, diversified, adapted.

Eating almost everything they can,

they travel quickly thru the upper branches.

Time travelers, we have nearly reached the present day.

It’s just 10,000 years ago.

15. Tree Logging / Human Tools


Humans have evolved and used the trees

in ways no animals have done before.

Within the last 200 years our tools have changed.

Our use of trees has much increased.

Now, today, it’s we, the humans,

that have brought the biggest change

to tropical rainforest around the world have ever seen.

And now the very moment our tools enable us

to harvest forests whole,

we suddenly can see the bigger picture.


16. The World Rainforest / News (CNN - Tropics in Trouble)

Coming up on the “International Hour” we’ll examine

new ecological reports on tropical rainforests.

Thousands of acres of rain forests

are destroyed worldwide

to make room for crops and cattle and roads.

Trees, trees and more trees are going down the river

every day in the name of progress.

The tragedy is that they won’t be replaced

because where these trees once grew is fast becoming a desert.

Scientists express the continual concerns

about the potential devastating effects of rainforest burning.

These fires … which produce 20% of the world’s fossil fuel carbon dioxide

are a major contributor to the greenhouse effect.


What is the greenhouse effect?

Answer: Carbon dioxide in the air lets sunlight pass through to Earth’s surface and warm it, but blocks heat rays from escaping.

What is global warming?

Answer: Destroying forests results in less carbon dioxide used by plants, contributing to more carbon dioxide in the air, blocking heat rays from escaping upward from the Earth’s atmosphere.

70% of the prescription drugs sold in the US came from plants only found only in the Amazon rainforest environment …

Now it is time to make peace with nature … with nature … with nature.

400 million years of evolution. Four minutes and a chainsaw brings it down.

17. Humans Mining The Tropics


The giants of the forest have been felled,

together with the life that they sustained.

Species which no humans have ever seen

are driven to extinction every day.



What does extinct mean?

Answer: no longer existing

If the clearing of the trees continue,

50 years could see these forest gone

and with them the variety and range of biological diversities.

18. Looking Closely At The Forest

The challenge is to understand

the rapid changes we have brought upon our planet.

The tropical rainforests of the world have shrunk dramatically.

Two of them remain untouched,

available for study.

Botanists, biologists, the chemists, entomologists

and all who wish to analyze and understand the forest ecosystem,

will sometimes travel several thousand miles

to reach a tiny airstrip

and a research site

that’s largely undisturbed.


What is a biologist?

Answer: a scientist who studies living organisms and life processes

What is a zoologist?

Answer: a scientist dealing with the study of animal life

What is a botanist?

Answer: a scientist dealing with the study of plant life

What is a chemist?

Answer: a scientist who studies composition, structure and properties of matter

What is an entomologist?

Answer: a scientist who studies insects

I’m always staggered

by how much there is to see and hear inside the forest.

Doing the search is challenging in these places.

The tropical forests all around the earth

cover less than 7% of the land surface.

We’ve only just, in the last 50-100 years,

begun to understand the biological history of the place.

We’re learning from on-going research

that more than 90% of the world’s species –

the ants, birds, mammals, plants,

bugs of all kinds -- live in the tropics.

It’s the very biology of our planet.

Everything we look at has some aspect here

that is quite unknown.

The more time I spend in the rainforest,

the more carefully I look,

the more I see.

19. Seeing the Forest From Another View

As humans standing on the ground,

we often only see the world that’s at our feet.

We need to look around …

above our heads.

I’ve been studying this small group of trees

for more than 10 years.

Yet each time I come up

I’m amazed to find species of plants

that I’ve never seen before.

There are over 28,000 species of plants

that actually live out their entire lives

up here in the tree tops.

I wanted to know what this incredibly abundant

group of plants are doing in the forest.

How do these plants affect the trees?

How do they affect the birds?

How do the birds affect them?

What would the forest be like

if these plants, the epiphytes, weren’t here?

As a kid I was always up in the trees,

and I know my mother, who is terribly afraid of heights,

still shakes her head in wonder

when she realizes what her daughter does for a living.

The results of my own research have surprised me.

I’ve learned that nearly half of the mineral nutrients

in the green foliage of the forest

are contained in the epiphytes themselves.

What is commensalism?

(as epiphytes (orchids) living their entire lives on trees)



Answer: a relationship in which one species benefits and the other is unaffected

This feeling that I might discover

something up there entirely new

is a major motivation for the science I do.

20. The Race to Learn About the Rainforest

Ground-based scientists, however agile,

find it hard to reach the topmost part

of the surface of the forest canopy.

A team of airborne scientists have a novel way

of getting around the problem.

(French) It is really wonderful being here.

Floating on a moving ocean of green

is like being at sea,

except for the sounds of monkeys, insects, birds, frogs.

Up here where there is so much sunlight

you can feel the impact of the whole forest

containing millions and millions of different species.

Sometimes the transpiration

from all the leaves of the forest

makes it seem like it raining up instead of down.


What is transpiration?

Answer: the process by which plants release from their leaves water that they have taken in through their roots

Everything is incredibly wet.

Our work – trying to understand it all –

has hardly even begun.

This is a story that began 400 million years ago.

It’s taken all that time to build a tropical rainforest.

21. Traveling Towards the Future (Music: “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”)


Let’s imagine that it’s 50 years from now.

There is much we have learned already about nature,

sometimes by using it to suit our needs.

We are just part of evolution,

no better than the insects and no worse.

But time and evolution

gave us conscience.

We can understand what’s going on.

We can see the consequence of our actions.

We can learn why species go extinct.

We have the tools,

and better, we have foresight.



Future is a time that we can change.

Jeopardy Questions


Vegetation

Ecosystem

Meteorology

Survival

Evolution

Careers

A 100

B 100


C 100

D 100

E 100

F 100

the transfer of pollen to the sticky pad at the top of the pistil (stigma)

sum of all external conditions affecting the life, development and survival of an organism

the main factor affecting a region's weather patterns

the process by which an organism moves

characteristics often shared by family members

a scientist who studies living organisms and life processes

Movie: Birds feed off the different fruits and flowers and spread seeds and pollen across the forest.

 

Movie: Every day since time on Earth began, the sun has traced a beam of energy and heat – a band -- around the Earth’s equator.

 

 

 

What is pollination?

What is environment?

What is latitude?

What is locomotion?

What are traits?

What is a biologist?

A 200

B 200


C 200

D 200

E 200

F 200

the raw materials used by green plants for photosynthesis

dead plants and animal wastes are broken down by these

the amount of water vapor in the air

animals that are active at night

an organism born with a trait that none of its ancestors have

a scientist dealing with the study of animal life

 

Movie: When a tree falls, termites quickly go to work and soon the forest floor reclaims what is supplied as everything recycles through the system.

Note: water vapor is a colorless, odorless gas -- not droplets of water.

 

 

 

What are carbon dioxide and water?

What is a decomposer?

What is humidity?

What are nocturnal?

What is a mutation?

What is a zoologist?

Vegetation

Ecosystem

Meteorology

Survival

Evolution

Careers


A 300

B 300

C 300

D 300

E 300

F 300

Carbon dioxide in the air lets sunlight pass through to Earth's surface and warm it, but blocks heat rays from escaping.

all the organisms living together

the process in which rising warm air cools and condenses, causing water vapor to change to dew

hiding or disguising by changing appearnce

the idea that life began with very primitive life forms that have, over time, changed into all the different types of organisms on Earth today

a scientist dealing with the study of plant life

 

When a partially rotted log was turned over, fungi, termites, bugs, ants, slugs, and earthworms were found to be living in and around it. Together, these organisms represent a _______.

 

Movie: Many creatures blend in with their backgrounds.

 

 

What is the greenhouse effect?

What is a community?

What is condensation?

What is camouflage?


What is the Theory of Evolution?

What is a botanist?

A 400

B 400

C 400

D 400

E 400

F 400

Destroying forests results in less carbon dioxide used by plants, contributing to a serious problem for the Earth.

a relationship in which both species benefit from the other's presence

Solid particles suspended in the air such as dust or smoke provide surfaces for dew and water droplets to form on. Clouds are made of a great many of these tiny droplets.

Tree-logging causes the death of animls living in the forests. Species which no humans have ever seen are driven to __________ every day.

a genetic change that occurs that makes a species more likely to survive in a given environment

a scientist who studies the composition, structure and properties of matter

 

Movie: One type of ant harvests leaves as food for fungus. As it grows, the fungus breaks the leaves down, converting it to food for ants.

Movie: In the morning, moist and sun-warmed air starts rising, prelude to the midday clouds, and every afternoon the rain descends …

 


Movie: Each individual is, by random chance, just marginally different from its parents. Just occassionally the variations prove a slight advantage for survival.

 

What is global warming?

What is mutualism?

What are condensation nuclei?

What is extinction?

What is adaptation?

What is a chemist?

Vegetation

Ecosystem

Meteorology

Survival

Evolution

Careers

A 500

B 500

C 500

D 500

E 500

F 500

the process by which plants release water from their leaves

a relationship in which one species benefits and the other is unaffected

In the process of condensation, water vapor changes to dew when it cools to its
__________ __________.

organisms that feed on plants

Individuals with traits better adapted to the environment are more likely to survive and reproduce, thereby passing on the more successful traits.


a scientist who studies insects

Movie: One airborne scientist said "Sometimes the _______ from all the leaves of the forest makes it seem like it's raining up instead of down. Everything is incredibly wet."

Movie: Orchids (epiphytes) grow on large tropical trees and derive moisture and nutrients from the air and rain. The orchids depend on the support given by the trees but do not harm the trees.

 

 

Movie: Under evolutionary pressure, those with an advantage tend to thrive, while other lines die out. They don’t’ succeed.
Example: An animal tends to attack and kill animals that are weak rather than those that are strong.

 

What is transpiration?

What is commensalism?

What is dew point?

What are herbivores?

What is natural selection?

What is an entomologist?






















Final Question

Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Queensland, Thailand, Burma, India, Madagascar, Congo, Cameroon, the Amazon, and the Central Isthmus of America







Where are the tropical rainforests on Earth?






Science Vocabulary In Script




adapted

ancestors

biological

diversities

biologists

biology

botanists

camouflage

canopy

carbon dioxide

chemists

clouds

complexity

dinosaurs

diversified

diversify

diversity

Earth

ecosystem

energy

entomologists


environment

epiphytes

equator

evolution

evolutionary

evolved

extinct

extinction

flowering

flowering plants

fossil fuel

fungi

fungus

generations

greenhouse effect

heat

humid

landscape

life-forms

light

locating echoes

mammals

mineral

nutrients

organism

organisms


patterns

planet

pollen

pollinate

pressure

primates

rain forest

recycles

seeds

sound

species

static

Sun

symbiotic

trait

transpiration

tropical

tropics

variations

water

Science Vocabulary Added


adaptation

commensalism

community

condensation


condensation nuclei

decomposer

dew point

ecosystem

global warming

herbivores

humidity

latitude

locomotion

meteorology

mutation

mutualism

natural selection

nocturnal

photosynthesis

pollination

Theory of Evolution

water vapor

zoologist


Tropical Rain Forest IMAX Crossword Puzzle


adaptation decomposer mutation

biologist dew point mutualism

botanist entomologist natural selection

camouflage environment nocturnal

canopy extinction pollen

carbon dioxide global warming pollination

chemist greenhouse effect rain forest

commensalism herbivore Theory of Evolution

community humidity trait

condensation latitude transpiration

condensation nuclei locomotion zoologist



Across

1. Carbon dioxide in the air lets sunlight pass through to Earth’s surface and warm it, but blocks heat rays from escaping. (2 words)

3. sum of all external conditions affecting the life, development and survival of an organism

4. all the organisms living together in an environment

7. the main factor affecting a region’s weather patterns

12. a scientist who studies insects

18. raw material used by green plants for photosynthesis; used with light and water (2 words)

19. the process in which rising warm air cools and condenses, causing water vapor to change to dew

20. a relationship in which both species benefit from the other’s presence

22. a fine, yellowish powder made of tiny grains that contain the male sex cells in plants

24. a scientist who studies living organisms and life processes

26. the transfer of pollen to the sticky pad at the top of the pistil (stigma)

27. animals that are active at night

29. the idea that life began with very primitive life forms that have, over time, changed into all the different types of organisms on Earth (3 words)

30. a plant or animal that was born with a trait that none of its ancestors had

33. a mutation that occurred that helped a species survive


Down

2. solid particles suspended in the air, such as dust or smoke, that provide surfaces for dew and water droplet to form on (2 words)

5. hiding or disguising by changing appearance

6. an organisms that only eats plants

8. the state of no longer existing

9. In the process of condensation, water vapor changes to dew when it cools to this temperature. (2 words)

10. characteristics often shared by family members

11. a scientist who studies plants

13. the process by which plants release water from their leaves

14. a tropical woodland with high annual rainfall (2 words)

15. a scientist dealing with the study of animal life

16. dead plants and animal wastes are broken down by these organisms

17. Destroying forests results in less carbon dioxide used by plants, contributing to more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, which prevents heat from escaping. (2 words)

21. a relationship in which one species benefits and the other is unaffected

23. a scientist who studies composition, structure and properties of matter

25. the process by which an organism moves

28. the amount of water vapor in the air

31. Individuals with traits better adapted to the environment are more likely to survive and reproduce, thereby passing on the more successful traits. (2 words)


32. the uppermost layer of spreading branches in a forest

Created by Puzzlemaker at DiscoveryEducation.com, sponsorship by Scotch.

Words and clues submitted to Puzzlemaker at DiscoveryEducation.com




adaptation

a mutation that occurred that helped a species survive; also, a mutation that did not prevent a plant or animal from surviving and reproducing, such as losing sting, thorns, or the ability to fly

biologist

a scientist who studies living organisms and life processes

botanist

a scientist who studies plants

camouflage

hiding or disguising by changing appearance

canopy

the uppermost layer of spreading branches in a forest

carbondioxide

raw material used by green plants for photosynthesis; used with light and water (2 words)

chemist

a scientist who studies composition, structure and properties of matter

commensalism

a relationship in which one species benefits and the other is unaffected

community

all the organisms living together in an environment


condensation

the process in which rising warm air cools and condenses, causing water vapor to change to dew

condensationnuclei

solid particles suspended in the air such as dust or smoke provide surfaces for dew and water droplet to form on; Clouds are made of a great many of these tiny droplets. (2 words)

decomposer

dead plants and animal wastes are broken down by these organisms

dewpoint

In the process of condensation, water vapor changes to dew when it cools to this temperature (2 words)

entomologist

a scientist who studies insects

environment

sum of all external conditions affecting the life, development and survival of an organism

extinction

the state of no longer existing

globalwarming

Destroying forests results in less carbon dioxide used by plants, contributing to more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, which prevents heat from escaping. (2 words)

greenhouseeffect

Carbon dioxide in the air lets sunlight pass through to Earth’s surface and warm it, but blocks heat rays from escaping. (2 words)

herbivore


an organisms that only eats plants

humidity

the amount of water vapor in the air

latitude

the main factor affecting a region’s weather patterns

locomotion

the process by which an organism moves

mutation

a plant or animal that was born with a trait that none of its ancestors had

mutualism

a relationship in which both species benefit from the other’s presence

naturalselection

Individuals with traits better adapted to the environment are more likely to survive and reproduce, thereby passing on the more successful traits. (2 words)

nocturnal

animals that are active at night

pollen

a fine, yellowish powder made of tiny grains that contain the male sex cells in plants

pollination

the transfer of pollen to the sticky pad at the top of the pistil (stigma)

rainforest

a tropical woodland with high annual rainfall (2 words)

TheoryofEvolution

the idea that life began with very primitive life forms that have, over time, changed into all the different types of organisms on Earth today (3 words)


trait

characteristics often shared by family members

transpiration

the process by which plants release water from their leaves

zoologist

a scientist dealing with the study of animal life


Tropical Rain forest IMAX Student Worksheet


4. Creatures of the Forest

What is locomotion?

5. Rain / Constant Wetness in the Forest

What is humidity?

What is condensation?


What are condensation nuclei?


What is dew point?


What is the main factor affecting a region’s weather patterns?

6. Sunlight to Darkness

What does nocturnal mean?

7. Biological Diversity

What is camouflage?

What is the Theory of Evolution?


What is a trait?

What is a mutation?

What is an adaptation?


What is natural selection?


10. Birds Populate and Pollinate the Forest

What is pollen?


What is pollination?


11. The First Inkling of Primates

What is the process for locating distant objects by means of sound waves reflected back to the sender from the objects? (as bats do)

12. The Forest Renews Itself

What is photosynthesis?


What are the raw materials used by green plants for photosynthesis?


What is the term for organisms that break down dead plants and animal wastes?

What is a canopy?

13. The Interdependence of Forest Organisms

What is the term for an organism that feeds on only plants?

What is mutualism?

What does environment mean?

What is a community?

16. The World Rainforest / News (CNN - Tropics in Trouble)

What is the greenhouse effect?



What is global warming?


17. Humans Mining The Tropics

What does extinct mean?

18. Looking Closely At The Forest

What is a biologist?

What is a zoologist?

What is a botanist?

What is a chemist?

What is an entomologist?

What is commensalism? (as epiphytes (orchids) living their entire lives on trees)

20. The Race to Learn About the Rainforest


What is transpiration?




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