Tudor and Stuart Exploration Summer Term Year 5 and 6 goetre junior school



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Tudor and Stuart Exploration Summer Term Year 5 and 6


GOETRE JUNIOR SCHOOL

Short/ Medium Term Planning Theme- Tudor and Stuart Exploration Phase Group- Year 5 and 6 Date- Summer term 2008




Lesson Objectives

Skills

Learning Objectives and Activities

Cross Curricular links-ICT-PSE Opportunities

Focused Skills

Communication

Numeracy

Thinking

Resources-

Human and Consumable

Learning Objectives met-if not actions taken

To use timelines to sequence events.
To use appropriate key words to estimate measure and describe the passage of time.

To identify differences between ways of life at different times.

To identify significant people and describe the main events within and across periods.










To ask and answer relevant questions

about the past
To plan the investigative approach to be used, suggesting how to find relevant information.



    To identify the ways in which the past is represented and interpreted.

    To distinguish between fact and opinion, giving some evidence/knowledge-based reasons for this.







    To identify significant people

    To plan the investigative approach to be used, suggesting how to find relevant information.



To select, record, and organise historical information

    To reflect on their findings and the investigative approach used.




    To identify significant people



To plan the investigative approach to be used, suggesting how to find relevant information.
To select, record, and organise historical information


    To identify the ways in which the past is represented and interpreted.

    To distinguish between fact and opinion, giving some evidence/knowledge-based reasons for this.




    To reflect on their findings and the investigative approach used.



    To locate the Tudor period in relation to other periods of British history

The reasons for Tudor exploration
Why did the Tudors explore outside Europe?

Use a time line to establish the chronological periods between the present and the Tudor period. Discuss with the children why people explore the world and space today. List the reasons why people explore the world today on a flip chart or white board.

Establish with the children that the Tudors were looking for new countries in which to trade wool and other goods and to bring back expensive items, eg spices and furs to sell at home. People were also looking for a place where they could practise their religion in freedom. Explain that the Tudors were looking for new lands in which to settle. List the reasons why the Tudors explored the world in a different colour on the flip chart or white board.

Ask the children to write paragraphs in the chosen colours to show reasons for exploration in Tudor times and today. Using a Venn diagram, discuss the reasons that are the same and the ones that are different.






    To compare the knowledge of the world that people had in Tudor times with what is known today

The context of the voyages of Tudor explorers

that exploration in the sixteenth century led to better knowledge of the world

How did knowledge of the world change during the Tudor period?

Give the children copies of maps from the period of the Tudor exploration and ask them to identify European countries and countries and areas from the wider world such as Australia, Africa, America and the Caribbean. Ask them to make a list of three countries that do not appear on the map and to identify other differences between the Tudor maps and present-day maps.

Give the children a copy of a map dating from the period before the voyages of exploration and ask them to compare it with the Tudor map to note the countries that had been added. Ask the children to suggest reasons why the maps changed during Tudor times. Establish that it was a period when sailors, particularly from Europe, went on voyages of exploration and, as a result, knowledge of the world developed. They could use a template of a map of the world today and colour code it to contrast the knowledge of the world before and after the voyages of exploration with the world today. The changes over time could be placed on a time line.


    To collect information from a range of sources and draw conclusions about life at sea

    To appreciate the dangers and discomfort of voyages of exploration

How did people explore the world in Tudor times?

Give the children sources that describe going to sea during the period, eg navigation, food, sea monsters, superstitions, punishments, daily life and disease. Divide the class into small groups, each using sources about one aspect. Ask the children to make notes of what they can find out about life on-board ship. Ask each group to present their findings to the rest of the class. The work might be displayed as a large topic web with an illustration of a ship in the centre.

Give the children an account of a voyage. Ask the children to add any new information to the topic web. Are there any points of disagreement in the different sources of information? Why is this?

Ask the children to construct a grid of the things that sailors might have enjoyed and the things they would have disliked about the voyage.


    To learn about the main events in Drake’s voyage around the world

To apply their understanding of chronology


to infer reasons why the voyage took place

Why did Drake circumnavigate the world?

Tell the story of Drake’s voyage. Give the children a time line to note the main events of the voyage against the correct dates. These dates and events can then be added to the world map and linked together to show Drake’s route around the world.
With the help of the children, retell the main events of the story. Ask the children to consider why the voyage was made. They might fill in individual matrices, each with a heading, eg Reasons to do with Drake’s own wishes, Reasons to do with money, Reasons to do with England. Individuals could form groups to pool their ideas about one set of reasons and then make group lists. As a class, discuss all the reasons why the voyage was made.

To learn about the growth of piracy and the reasons for its growth.

To look at the lives of significant welsh pirates
To investigate life on board a pirate ship
To investigate the lives of some famous pirates such as the Welshmen Henry Morgan and Barti DDu

Ever since Christopher Columbus, the Spanish had the strongest hold on the wealth of the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America. England, Holland and France all wanted what Spain had, and employed pirates and privateers to set up colonies in the Caribbean and take by force some of Spain's wealth.



. Divide the class into small groups, each using sources about one aspect. Ask the children to make notes of what they can find out about life on-board a pirate ship.

Compare and contrast the lives and characters of Henry Morgan and Barti DDu. Who do they feel was the most successful pirate and why?



Thinking Skills
Plan

Asking questions

  1. Ask why what, how, where,when etc


  2. Ask questions related to context and listen before asking further questions.

  3. Ask relevant questions and begin to link questions into sequences. Give reasons for choice of questions.

  4. Ask questions that build on responses to earlier questions.

Activating prior knowledge, skills and understanding.



  1. Show awareness of personal needs and skills.

  2. Identify and make links with prior knowledge

  3. Identify gaps and begin to build on existing knowledge, understanding and skills

  4. Build on existing knowledge, understanding and skills.

Gathering informing



  1. Choose from given options where to find information and ideas.

  2. Suggest where to find information and ideas related to context

  3. Suggest how to find relevant information and ideas.

  4. Suggest a range of options as to where and how to find relevant information and ideas

Determine the process/method and strategy



  1. Choose from given options what to do and how to do it

  2. Plan with support the process/method to be used

  3. Plan the process/method to be used.

  4. Suggest alternative processes/methods; identify the learning/thinking strategy to be used.



Develop (Creative and Critical Thinking)
Forming opinions and making decisions

  1. Begin to express own opinions and make decisions in everyday routines

  2. Form opinions and make decisions by weighing up some pros and cons

  3. Form considered opinions and make informed decisions
  4. Consider others views to inform opinions and decisions

Monitoring progress



  1. With support, follow the chosen process/method.

  2. Follow the planned process/method

  3. Follow the planned process/method, making some amendments where necessary

  4. Regularly check progress making ongoing revisions to process/method where necessary

Reflect
Evaluating own learning and thinking

  1. Show in response to questions some of what has been learned/found out

  2. Describe what has been learned/found out.

  3. Describe how they have learned and identified the ways that worked the best

  4. Identify the learning/thinking strategies they have used.

Developing Communication across the Curriculum

Oracy
Presenting information and ideas

  1. Talk to themselves and to others and understand many more words than they can speak. Use simple vocabulary to convey meaning.

  2. Communicate with increasing confidence to peers and others. Begin to modify their talk to the requirements of the audience, using a growing vocabulary.

  3. Communicate clearly and confidently in a way that suits the subject, audience and purpose, using a range of vocabulary, including some key words related to subjects.

  4. Communicate clearly and effectively in a way that suits the subject, audience and purpose. Use a wide and subject specific language.

Locating, selecting and using information using reading strategies.

Responding to what has been read.
Writing (organizing ideas and information)
Communicating information
ICT
Creating and presenting information and ideas.

Developing Number across the Curriculum

Interpreting results and presenting findings
Recording and interpreting data and presenting findings.


maps from before and after the Tudor voyages of exploration Martellus’s map of 1489, Robert Thorne’s map of 1527, Sir Humphrey Gilbert’s map of 1566.

  • Modern maps



  • a class time line

  • accounts of Drake’s circumnavigation and attitudes to it

  • sources that illustrate aspects of life on-board ship during the period, eg navigation, food, sections of ships, sea monsters, superstitions, punishments, daily life and disease

Snaith primary school website explorers


The making of Modern Wales book 3


The Usborne Book of Explorers

Snaith primary school website Sir Francis Drake

Maps of the world


Resource sheets

Books on Pirates


The life of Barti DDu

Pirates (Horrible Histories)


Pirates of the Caribbean film
The making of Modern Wales book 3
Internet sites

    To locate the Tudor period correctly on a time line

    To record reasons for Tudor exploration

To identify similarities and differences between exploration in the Tudor period and the present




    To identify differences between medieval, Tudor and modern maps of the world

    To identify ways in which knowledge of the world during Tudor times was more accurate than in the Middle Ages


To make the link between voyages of exploration and more accurate maps


    find out and record aspects of the daily life of sailors

    identify enjoyable and disagreeable aspects of life at sea

    recognise that there are different interpretations of voyages and give reasons for this


record information in different ways


    match the dates and events of the voyage

    plot the voyage on a world map

sort the reasons for the voyage into categories












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