U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development



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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Community Planning and Development


Special Attention of:



Notice: CPD-05-09

All Secretary's Representatives

All State/Area Coordinators Issued: November 3, 2005

All CPD Office Directors Expires: November 3, 2006

All HOME Coordinators

All HOME Participating Jurisdictions

All CDBG Grantees

All FHEO Field Directors

SUBJECT: Accessibility Notice: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and The Fair Housing Act and their applicability to housing programs funded by the HOME Investment Partnerships Program and the Community Development Block Grant Program

I. PURPOSE

The purpose of this Notice is to remind recipients of Federal funds for the HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) or the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program of their obligation to comply with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Fair Housing Act, and HUD's implementing Regulations (24 CFR Parts 8 and 100, respectively), which prohibit discrimination based on disability and establish requirements for program accessibility and physical accessibility in connection with housing programs. This Notice describes key compliance elements for housing assisted under the HOME and CDBG programs. However, recipients should review the specific provisions of the Fair Housing Act, Section 504, and their respective regulations in order to assure that their programs are administered in full compliance. Note that with respect to Section 504, this Notice does not address the applicability of Section 504's physical accessibility requirements to homeownership programs financed with HOME/CDBG assistance.

The Notice also recommends that recipients conduct updated self evaluations as a useful tool for enhancing efforts to comply with accessibility requirements in HOME/CDBG programs, as well as to document those efforts.
Applicability
This Notice applies to new construction and rehabilitation of housing under the HOME and CDBG programs. Each primary recipient of Federal funds from the HOME or CDBG program is responsible for providing this notice to each organization or other entity participating in the construction or rehabilitation of projects receiving such funding and for establishing policies and practices that it will use to monitor compliance of all covered programs, activities, or work performed by subrecipients, contractors, subcontractors, management agents, etc.

Distribution: W-3-1



II. SECTION 504 OF THE REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973
Background
The HOME and CDBG programs, through State and local governments, provide assistance that may be used for the construction or rehabilitation of affordable housing. HOME and CDBG funds may be used to construct or rehabilitate rental housing, to rehabilitate owner-occupied housing, and to finance homeownership programs.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in the operation of programs receiving Federal financial assistance. HUD regulations implementing Section 504 contain accessibility requirements for new construction and rehabilitation of housing as well as requirements for ensuring that the programs themselves are operated in a manner that is accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities (see 24 CFR Part 8).

For the purposes of this Notice, the references to multifamily housing projects covered by Section 504 only apply to multifamily rental housing projects.
The Section 504 regulations define "recipient" as any State or its political subdivision, any instrumentality of a state or its political subdivision, any public or private agency, institution, organization, or other entity, or any person to which Federal financial assistance is extended for any program or activity directly or through another recipient, including any successor, assignee, or transferee of a recipient, but excluding the ultimate beneficiary of the assistance (24 CFR 8.3). A family that will receive CDBG or HOME funds for the rehabilitation of an owner-occupied unit is not subject to the requirements of Part 8, since it is the ultimate beneficiary of the funds.
New construction
HUD regulations implementing Section 504 at 24 CFR 8.22(a) require that new construction of multifamily projects be designed and constructed to be readily accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities. Multifamily housing projects are defined at 24 CFR 8.3 as "projects containing five or more dwelling units." Both the individual units and the common areas in the building must be accessible.

For new construction of multifamily rental projects, a minimum of 5 percent of the dwelling units in the project (but not less than one unit) must be accessible to individuals with mobility impairments. An additional 2 percent of the dwelling units (but at a minimum, not less than one unit) must be accessible to individuals with sensory impairments (i.e., hearing or vision impairments) unless HUD prescribes a higher number pursuant to 24 CFR 8.22(c).

Rehabilitation
Substantial alterations - Section 504 requires that if alterations are undertaken to a housing project that has 15 or more units, and the rehabilitation costs will be 75 percent or more of the replacement cost of the completed facility, then such developments are considered to have undergone "substantial alterations" (24 CFR 8.23 (a)). For substantial alterations of multifamily rental housing, the accessibility requirements contained in 24 CFR 8.22 must be followed -- a minimum of 5 percent of the dwelling units in the project (but not less than one unit) must be accessible to individuals with mobility impairments, and an additional 2 percent, at a minimum (but not less than one unit), must be accessible to individuals with sensory impairments.

Other alterations -- When other alterations that do not meet the regulatory definition of substantial alterations are undertaken in multifamily rental housing projects of any size, these alterations must, to the maximum extent feasible, make the dwelling units accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, until a minimum of 5 percent of the dwelling units (but not less than one unit) are accessible to people with mobility impairments, unless HUD prescribes a higher number pursuant to 24 CFR 8.23(b)(2). If alterations of single elements or spaces of a dwelling unit, when considered together, amount to an alteration of a dwelling unit, then the entire dwelling unit shall be made accessible. For this category of rehabilitation the additional 2 percent of the dwelling units requirement for individuals with sensory impairments does not apply. Alterations to common spaces must, to the maximum extent feasible, make those areas accessible. A recipient is not required to make a dwelling unit, common area, facility or element accessible, if doing so would impose undue financial and administrative burdens on the operation of the multifamily housing project (24 CFR 8.23(b)). Therefore, with regards to covered alterations, recipients are only required to provide access up to the point of being an undue financial and administrative burden.

Accessibility Standards
Dwelling units designed and constructed in accordance with the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) will be deemed to comply with the Section 504 regulation. For copies of UFAS, contact the HUD Distribution Center at 1-800-767-7468; hearing or speech-impaired persons may access this number via TTY by calling the Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339. Accessible units must be, to the maximum extent feasible, distributed throughout the projects and sites, and must be available in a sufficient range of sizes and amenities so as not to limit choice.
III. FAIR HOUSING ACT
Background
The Fair Housing Act applies to most housing sold or rented in the United States. The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing practices on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. The Fair Housing Act was amended in 1988 to provide protections from discrimination in any aspect of the sale or rental of housing for families with children and persons with disabilities. The Fair Housing Act also establishes requirements for the design and construction of new rental or for sale multifamily housing to ensure a minimum level of accessibility for persons with disabilities (see 24 CFR 100.200 et seq.).
Section of the Fair Housing Act at 804(f)(3)(C) requires that covered multifamily dwelling units designed and constructed for initial occupancy after March 13, 1991, be designed and constructed in a manner that:
(i) the public and common use portions of such dwellings are readily accessible to and usable by disabled persons;

(ii) the doors are designed to allow passage into and within the premises of such dwelling units and are sufficiently wide to allow passage by disabled persons in wheelchairs; and

(iii) all premises within such dwelling units contain the following features of adaptive design:
(I) an accessible route into and through the dwelling unit;

(II) light switches, electrical outlets, thermostats, and other environmental controls in

accessible locations;

(III) reinforcements in bathroom walls to allow later installation of grab bars; and

(IV) usable kitchens and usable bathrooms such that an individual in a wheelchair can maneuver about the space.
Covered multifamily dwelling units are:


  • dwelling units in buildings consisting of 4 or more units served by one or more elevators, or

  • ground floor dwelling units in other buildings with 4 or more units.

Information about housing designs that provide accessible features in compliance with the Fair Housing Act can be found in the HUD's Fair Housing Accessibility Guidelines, which were published in the Federal Register on March 6, 1991 (56 F.R. 9472) and in HUD's Fair Housing Act Design Manual. These can be obtained from the HUD Distribution Center at 1-800-767-7468. Hearing-impaired or speech-impaired individuals also may access this number via TTY by calling the Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339.


The design and construction requirements in the Fair Housing Act apply only to a building designed and constructed for initial occupancy after March 13, 1991. The Fair Housing Act regulations define a building for initial occupancy as a building that has never been used for any purpose. Thus, the design and construction requirements in the Fair Housing Act will not apply to rehabilitation projects or activities.
Illustrations

It must be noted that, in many cases, new construction of rental projects funded in the HOME/CDBG Programs must meet both the Fair Housing Act and the Section 504 new construction requirements. Where two or more accessibility standards apply, the housing provider is required to follow and apply both standards, so that maximum accessibility is obtained.

The following examples illustrate how these requirements will (or will not) apply.



  • A rental building with an elevator constructed with HOME/CDBG funding would be required to have 5% of its dwelling units meet the Section 504 accessibility requirements at 24 CFR 8.22 and the remaining 95% of the dwelling units would be required to comply with the Fair Housing Act design and construction requirements at 24 CFR 100.205. Note: An additional 2% of the dwelling units are required to be accessible for people with vision and hearing impairments.




  • A newly constructed 100 unit two-story garden apartment development with no elevator that received HOME/CDBG assistance, with half (50) of its dwelling units on the ground floor and half (50) on the second floor, would be required to have 5 of its ground floor dwelling units built to comply with the Section 504 accessibility requirements at 24 CFR 8.22, and the remaining 45 ground floor dwelling units built to comply with the Fair Housing Act design and construction requirements at 24 CFR 100.205. Note: An additional 2% of the dwelling units are required to be accessible for people with vision and hearing impairments in accordance with Section 504.



  • A development consisting entirely of multistory rental townhouses constructed with Federal financial assistance is not a covered multifamily dwelling for purposes of the design and construction requirements of the Fair Housing Act at 24 CFR 100.205, since none of the dwelling units qualify as ground floor units, but the project would still have to meet the Section 504 5% + 2% accessibility requirements at 24 CFR 8.22. (A townhouse development of 5 or more single story dwelling units would still have to comply with both Section 504 and the Fair Housing Act design and construction requirements at 24 CFR 100.200 et. seq.)



IV. Increasing Program Accessibility
HUD's Section 504 regulations require that a recipient of Federal financial assistance ensure that its program, when viewed in its entirety, is accessible to persons with disabilities (24 CFR 8.20). In order to meet this obligation, participants in the HOME/CDBG program must:


  • To the maximum extent feasible, distribute accessible units throughout the projects and make them available in a sufficient range of sizes and amenities so as not to limit choice.




  • Adopt suitable means to assure that information regarding the availability of accessible units reaches eligible individuals with disabilities. They must also take reasonable nondiscriminatory steps to maximize use of such units by eligible individuals.




  • When an accessible unit becomes vacant, before offering the unit to an individual without a disability, offer the unit: first, to a current occupant of the project requiring the accessibility feature and, second, to an eligible qualified applicant on the waiting list requiring the accessibility features.




  • When an applicant or tenant requires an accessible feature or policy modification to accommodate a disability, a federally assisted provider must provide such feature or policy modification unless doing so would result in a fundamental alternation in the nature of its program or an undue financial and administrative burden. See 24 CFR 8.4, 8.24, and 8.33 for further requirements and guidance.



  • Providers are required to ensure that information about their programs is disseminated in a manner that is accessible to persons with disabilities. For example, special communication systems can greatly increase the effectiveness of outreach and ongoing communication (e.g., Telecommunications Devices for the Deaf (TTY), materials on tape or in Braille).





  • Providers must ensure that activities and meetings are conducted in accessible locations.

Participants in the HOME/CDBG program may:




  • Ask applicants for information that demonstrates they can meet the obligations of tenancy, including financial information, references, prior tenancy history, etc. However, housing providers may not inquire into the nature and severity of an applicant or tenant's disability, nor may they ask persons with disabilities questions not asked of all applicants, apply different types of screening criteria, or assess an applicant's ability to live independently.




  • Ask if the applicant qualifies for a housing program or unit designed for persons with a disability when the housing program or unit is designed for such persons.




  • Consider including a lease provision that requires a nondisabled family occupying an accessible unit to move if a family with a disability needing that size unit applies and there is an appropriately sized nonaccessible unit available for the relocating family.


V. Visitability
Visitability Concept
Although not a requirement, it is recommended that all design, construction and alterations incorporate, whenever practical, the concept of visitability in addition to the requirements under Section 504 and the Fair Housing Act.
Visitability is a design concept, which for very little or no additional cost, enables persons with disabilities to visit relatives, friends, and neighbors in their homes within a community.

Design Considerations

Visitability design incorporates the following in all construction or alterations, in addition to the applicable requirements of Section 504 and the Fair Housing Act, whenever practical and possible for as many units as possible within a development:


  • Provide a 32" clear opening in all bathroom and interior doorways.

  • Provide at least one accessible means of egress/ingress for each unit.


Benefits
Visitability also expands the availability of housing options for individuals who may not require full accessibility. It will assist project owners in making reasonable accommodations and reduce, in some cases, the need for structural modifications or transfers when individuals become disabled in place. Visitability will also improve the marketability of units. Further information regarding the concept of visitability may be obtained through the HUD web page (http://www.huduser.org/publications/pubasst/strategies.html).
VI. Self-Evaluation
The Section 504 regulations required recipients of Federal financial assistance to conduct a self-evaluation of their policies and practices to determine if they were consistent with the law's requirements. This self-evaluation was to have been completed no later than July 11, 1989. The regulatory deadlines are long past. Nonetheless, recipients who have not completed a self-evaluation are encouraged to conduct a self-evaluation to be in compliance with requirement under these regulatory provisions.

Involving persons with disabilities in the self-evaluation process is very beneficial. This will assure the most meaningful result for both the recipient and for persons with disabilities who participate in the recipients programs and activities. It is important to involve persons and/or organizations representing persons with disabilities, and agencies or other experts who work regularly with accessibility standards.

Important steps in conducting a self-evaluation and implementing its results include the following:


  • Evaluate current policies and practices and analyze them to determine if they adversely affect the full participation of individuals with disabilities in its programs, activities and services. Be mindful of the fact that a policy or practice may appear neutral on its face, but may have a discriminatory effect on individuals with disabilities.




  • Modify any policies and practices that are not or may not be in compliance with Section 504 regulations.




  • Take appropriate corrective steps to remedy those policies and practices which either are discriminatory or have a discriminatory effect. Develop policies and procedures by which persons with disabilities may request a modification of a physical barrier or a rule or practice that has the effect of limiting or excluding a person with a disability from the benefits of the program.




  • Document the self-evaluation process and activities. The Department recommends that all recipients keep the self-evaluation file for at least three years, including records of the individuals and organizations consulted, areas examined and problems identified, and document modifications and remedial steps.

The Department also recommends that recipients periodically update the self-evaluation, particularly, for example, if there have been changes in recipient owned housing stock, such as demolition of housing units and construction and/or alteration of housing, or changes in the programs and services of the agency.

VII. HUD Technical Assistance Concerning these Requirements

Further information concerning compliance with any of these requirements may be obtained through the HUD web page (http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/disabilities/sect504.cfm). Additional assistance and information may be obtained by contacting the local HUD Office of Community Planning and Development (CPD) and the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO) listed below:
CPD FHEO
Boston, MA 617 994-8357 617 994-8300

Hartford, CT 806 240-4800 x3059 860 240-4800

New York, NY 212 542-7401 212 264-1290

Buffalo, NY 716 551-5755 x5800 716 551-5755

Newark, NJ 973 622-7900 x3300 973 622-7900

Philadelphia, PA 215 656-0624 x3201 215 656-0663

Pittsburgh, PA 412 644-2999 412 644-6970

Baltimore, MD 410 962-2520 x3071 410 962-2520

Richmond, VA 804 771-2100 x3766 804 771-2100

Washington, DC 202 275-9200 x3l63 202 275-9200

Atlanta, GA 404 331-5001 x2449 404 331-5140

Birmingham, AL 205 731-2630 x1027 205 731-2630

South Florida 305 536-5678 x2257 305 536-5678 x2218

Jacksonville, FL 904 232-1777 x2077 904 232-1241

San Juan, PR 787 766-5201 787 766-5400

Louisville, KY 502 582-6163 x200 502 582-6163 x230


Jackson, MS 601 965-4700 x3140 601 965-4700 x2435

Knoxville, TN 865 545-4391 x125 865 545-4400

Greensboro, NC 336 547-4000 336 547-4050

Columbia, SC 803 765-5564 803 765-5938

Chicago, IL 312 353-1696 x2713 312 353-7776

Minneapolis, MN 612 370-3019 x2107 612 370-3185

Detroit, MI 313 226-7900 x8059 313 226-7900

Milwaukee, WI 414 297-3214 x8100 414 297-3214

Columbus, OH 614 469-5737 x8240 614 469-5737 x8170

Indianapolis, IN 317 226-6303 x6790 317 226-6303

Little Rock, AK 501 324-6375 x3300 501 324-6296

Oklahoma City, OK 405 609-8569 405 609-8435

Kansas City, KS 913 551-5485 913 551-6958

Omaha, NE 402 492-3147 402 492-3109

St. Louis, MO 314 539-6524 314 539-6583

New Orleans, LA 504 589-7214 x1047 504 589-7219

Fort Worth, TX 817 978-5934 817 978-5900

San Antonio, TX 210 475-6821 210 475-6885

Albuquerque, NM 505 346-7361 505 346-6463

Denver, CO 303 672-5414 xl326 303 672-5437


San Francisco, CA 415 489-6597 415 489-6524

Los Angeles, CA 213 894-8000 x3300 213 894-8000 x2600

Honolulu, HI 808 522-8180 x264 808 522-8175

Phoenix, AZ 602 379-7175 602 379-6699 x5261

Seattle, WA 206 220-5268 206 220-5170

Portland, OR 503 326-7018 503 326-2561

Manchester, NH 603 666-7510 x3017 617 994-8300

Anchorage, AK 907 677-9890 907 677-9837

Houston, TX 817 978-5934 713 718-3199





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