Unit 1 – Story Questions – Corduroy Suggested vocabulary with picture cards



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Unit 1 – Story Questions – Corduroy

Suggested vocabulary with picture cards: escalator (5), flashlight (8), overalls (4), palace (7), thread (6).
Before you Read:

Connecting Activity – Close your eyes and make a picture of a time that you wanted to be chosen/picked to be someone’s friend. Maybe it was here at school that you wanted someone to ask you to join them in the block center, maybe it was when we were playing outside and you wanted someone to ask you to play.

The book we are about to read, Corduroy, is about a bear who wants to get chosen. Remember how you felt when you wanted to be chosen will help you understand how this character feels in the story. This story is fiction, a made-up story. As good readers, when we read fiction/made-up stories, we need to get ready to meet the characters, who this story is about, find out where the story takes place, the setting, and pay special attention to each thing, event that happens in the story.


Additional vocabulary:

There is a word I want you to think about before we begin to read. The word is searching. When we are searching for something, we are looking for it.


Asking Questions:

As a good reader, I always begin a book by looking at the title and the illustrations on the cover and I find myself wondering. The first thing I wonder is …..is this Corduroy (point to bear) and then I begin to wonder why the bear wants this white thing? (point to button)


In addition to some of the questions listed in the curriculum guide, you may wish to use the following.

End of page 5 – (Stopping and restating to remember important information)

As a good reader, I want to make sure that I understand all the important information that the author has given me in the story so far – who the main character is, the character’s name, and the character’s problem. If I’m not sure I can go back and reread or look at the pictures again. (Demo going back.)

Bottom of page 8 – (Making connections to understand the character’s feelings)

Right now, as a good reader, I am making a connection to how Corduroy is feeling. I remember how I felt when I wanted someone to pick me. I use this feeling to help me understand exactly how Corduroy is feeling right now in the story.



Bottom f page 11 – Building vocabulary, recalling important information, asking questions as a motivator to keep reading)

There’s that word searching. Corduroy is going back to look back everywhere for his lost button. As good readers, I am sure, like myself, you are wondering where Corduroy is going to look.


Bottom of page 15 – restating important information)

As good readers, we know why Corduroy is here. We remember (as you speak, show the corresponding pages of the book) when Corduroy climbed down from the shelf and then went up the escalator and is now in this big room searching/looking for his ????????


Bottom of page 19 – (Visualizing the setting)

Right now, as good readers, you should hear that loud crash as the tall lamp falls over. Seeing the lamp and hearing the crash will help you better understand the story. Do you remember in what other story we heard a monumental crash? (Noisy Nora)

Bottom of page 21 (Predicting next event)

As a good reader, I find myself predicting who the night watchman will find. I use what I know about the story, so far, all the events that happened to help me predict what will happen next. (Go back and quickly review the events the events while showing the pictures.)

Bottom of page 23 – (Repairing understandings)

It is important that if your prediction is different from the author’s that you change it to match the author’s.


Bottom of page 27 – (Making inferences to better understand the character’s feelings)

As good readers, even though the author doesn’t tell us, we can infer, figure out, how Corduroy is feeling right now in the story. We use what we know about the story so far to help us know how Corduroy is feeling right now.



Borrowed HEAVILY from: REACH Associates, 2004, Cathy Feldman and Lee Kappes






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