Unit 1, Lesson a page 4, Listening



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Unit 1, Lesson A

Page 4, Listening

B. Pair work. Listen. Take notes and then answer these questions with a partner. [CD Track 01]
Judy: Welcome to the program, everyone. Today’s featured guest is Al Benning, a professor of anthropology
(Host): at UCLA. He’s working with the city on a new project that many of you may be interested in. Welcome to the program, Al.

Al: Thanks, Judy.

Judy: Start out by telling us about—what this project is called, and what it’s all about.

Al: Sure. It’s called "Everybody has a story." The city approached me about a project to get people to talk about their life experiences. I jumped at the opportunity. . . We ended up setting up a booth on Ellis Street downtown for people to come to and tell their stories.

Judy: How does it work exactly? Let’s say—OK, let’s say, I want to try it. What do I have to do?

Al: Well, first you should, urn . . . well, you have to think of a family member, friend, or neighbor—someone, you know, you think has a story to tell—that’s the first step. Then, the two of you come to the booth: you interview the person and make a tape recording of what you talk about.... Um, afterwards you get a copy of the recording, and we keep a copy as well. Best of all, it’s free.

Judy: It sounds like fun, but what’s the purpose of doing this? I mean, why... why interview someone you already know?

Al: Those are good questions. You know, it’s like this... we’re all used to reading books or watching TV or movies to learn about history right? But today, historians believe that the experiences and memories of everyday people can also teach us something about our history—you know, the stories of regular people like you and me. Recording our own stories is a way for us to save our day-to-day experiences for people in the future to study.

Judy: OK, great. Um... shall we listen to a clip from one of the interviews now? Who are we going to hear?

Al: Uh... sure. This is Cleo and her mother... um... actually... it’s Cleo interviewing her mother, Mary and... Mary is talking about her experience working in a Los Angeles café in 1957. As an African-American woman living in the United States, of course, she struggled because she wasn’t treated equally by whites.

Judy: What’s Mary doing nowadays?

Al: She still works in the same café—she... her job’s a lot different now though.

Judy: OK. Let’s listen to the clip.

Cleo: So, Mom, you’ve owned the Crystal Café for five years now. That’s quite a change from before.

Mary: Yes, it certainly is.

Cleo: When did you start working there, ...and what did you do?

Mary: Let’s see... I started in 1957. I worked mostly in the kitchen... and did, you know, general cleaning...

Cleo: What else did you do?

Mary: Well... OK... I also filled in wherever they needed help. When the dishwasher was sick, I washed the dishes. If the sandwich people needed extra help, I helped them.

Cleo: It doesn’t sound too bad.

Mary: Well, that part was all right, but you know... Remember, I never served the customers directly. Wasn’t allowed to... Black people weren’t allowed to serve the white folks. I couldn’t serve the customers and I definitely couldn’t eat there either. We had to eat somewhere else.

Cleo: Things have really changed since then, haven’t they?

Mary: Yes, they have! Now I own the café! I own it! I can eat lunch there every day!


Judy: That’s a wonderful story... We’re running out of time, so quickly, please tell our listeners where they can find your booth.

Al: We’re located at the corner of Ellis Street and Second Avenue. You can get more information by checking out our web site at www...


C. Listen again to Mary’s story only. Complete the chart. [CD Track02]

Cleo: So, Mom, you’ve owned the Crystal Café for five years now. That’s quite a change from before.

Mary: Yes, it certainly is.

Cleo: When did you start working there, ...and what did you do?

Mary: Let’s see... I started in 1957. I worked mostly in the kitchen... and did, you know, general cleaning...

Cleo: What else did you do?

Mary: Well... OK... I also filled in wherever they needed help. When the dishwasher was sick, I washed the dishes. If the sandwich people needed extra help, I helped them.

Cleo: It doesn’t sound too bad.

Mary: Well, that part was all right, but you know... Remember, I never served the customers directly. Wasn’t allowed to... Black people weren’t allowed to serve the white folks. I couldn’t serve the customers and I definitely couldn’t eat there either. We had to eat somewhere else.

Cleo: Things have really changed since then, haven’t they?

Mary: Yes, they have! Now I own the café! I own it! I can eat lunch there every day!


Page 15, Listening

A. Listen to this news report. Then circle the correct answers below that describe the report. [CD Track 03]


[CD Track 04]

John (Anchor): That’s a look at the national news this evening... And now let’s return to our top local story. the blackout... At this hour, over 100,000 houses in the metro area remain without power. The northern part of the county has been left in the dark, not knowing when electricity will be restored.... And the weather isn’t cooperating either. For the latest details, let’s go to Marianne on the street. Marianne?

Marianne (Reporter): Yes, John. I’m standing here at the corner of Knox and Delmar Streets. As we move into the eighth hour of the blackout, the streets are fairly quiet, but no traffic signals are working so traffic is heavy in spots as people struggle to get home from work. Some people are trying to walk home. Most houses and buildings are dark. Some businesses are trying to stay open, but it’s a mess. It was just after 2 P.M. today when the electricity went out here. Now, eight hours later, we are starting to get to the bottom of the problem. We are just learning that the power company blames the problem on equipment failure and overuse. Too many people using too much electricity on a hot day. One piece of broken equipment on this terribly hot day has caused this incredible mess.

John: How are people doing, Marianne? How are they coping?

Marianne: It’s a real struggle. John. The subways aren’t running, phones aren’t working, people are hot... there’s nothing we can do but wait until “the lights come back on,”—so to speak. It really shows how dependent on electricity we are...

John: Of course, as you mentioned, the weather isn’t helping matters either...

Marianne: That’s right, John... it’s hot. Too hot. This record-breaking heat is responsible for as many eleven deaths so far. People can’t use their air conditioners or fans. With the temperatures well over 100 degrees today, offices, homes, apartments, restaurants, you name it, all became unbearably hot. The city has opened up twelve cooling centers throughout the city. At the end of this report, we’ll put those addresses up on the screen for you. As you can see behind me, even at this late hour many people cannot return to their homes, and are choosing to spend the night right here on the street.

John: What has the city done so far?

Marianne: Well, for now, they’re urging older people, pregnant women, families with small children to go to one of the dozen city cooling centers to spend the night.

John: What about looting? Are people taking advantage of the blackout?

Marianne: All in all, it’s quiet. There HAS been some looting—several stores were broken into—mostly electronics— TVs, DVDs—and jewelry. As a result, extra police are on the streets—so far they are keeping the peace... That’s it for now, John, back to you.

John: Thank you, Marianne. Here we have the addresses of the twelve cooling centers around the city, along with the phone number to call if you need emergency help. Stay tuned for updates on the blackout. Now we turn to sports...

B. Listen again. What caused these three things to happen? Write your answers. [CD Track 05] (Replay CD Track 04)
C. Listen again and complete these items with the appropriate number or numerical expression. [CD Track 06] (Replay CD Track 04)


World Pass --audio script for Sophomore English Level 2



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