Unit Plan 6th Grade English/Language Arts



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P-2, Advanced Proficiency, 6th Grade, English/Language Arts

Unit Plan

6th Grade - English/Language Arts





UNIT BACKGROUND

Unit Number and Title: Unit 2: What a story!

Grade Level: 6

Subject/Topic: Short Stories

Key Words: Fiction, short story, expression, text cues, dialogue, punctuation, visualization, sensory images, text-to-self connection, empathy, prediction, plot structure (introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution), theme, characterization, first person point of view, third person point of view, mood, idea development, brainstorming/webbing/mapping, narrowing ideas using RAFTS (role, audience, format, topic, strong verb), elaboration, detail, peer editing, clarity, detail, subject-verb agreement, adjective, adverb.

Length (in weeks / days): 4 weeks/ 20 days

Quarter: 1

Step 1: Creating Vision and Planning for Assessment

Unit GOAL

Technical:


Reading

Students will continue to deepen their understanding and application of metacognitive reading strategies during their independent reading to aid comprehension. Specifically, students will be able to independently apply the strategies of visualization/mental movies and text-to-text connections at the end of this unit.


Literature

Students will be able to read a variety of texts and demonstrate mastery (80%) on being able to:


  • Identify and analyze the following story elements: plot, character, setting, mood, point-of-view, and figurative language (simile only); by analyze, students will have to discuss the author’s use of the story element and how that use affects the text as a whole (i.e., the author’s use of setting contributes to the suspenseful mood of the story).

  • After reading a story, explain how the story is organized using the stages of plot development; explain how/why that organization impacts the text

  • Identify the theme of a text and explain how the author develops that theme in the work.

  • Determine the author’s purpose and point-of-view of a given text.

Writing

Students will create a written narrative that is focused on one clear, coherent, well-developed idea and includes relevant and strong details and elaboration. Students will also show mastery of the following written conventions through this narrative: subject-verb agreement, paragraph structure, dialogue punctuation, sentence punctuation.)



Motivating Vision of Student Success:

Together, we will log 3750 minutes of independent reading time during this unit, begin our quest to become literary leaders, and create our first written narrative!



P2(1): The teacher include the vision for the assessment in the unit plan. (AP)

Unit Plan – Planning For Assessment


How will I measure my Unit Goal?

  • Unit test: short answer and multiple choice questions on literary analysis standards, reading comprehension (students will be expected to apply the standards with new texts, not the texts we are reading during the unit).
  • Written narrative, scored on rubric for ideas and elaboration, as well as specific conventions taught during this unit (subject-verb agreement, paragraph structure, dialogue punctuation, sentence punctuation)


How will I measure progress toward the Unit Goal?

  • Individual reading conferences (at least 1 per student every two weeks)

  • Readers’ response journals to monitor comprehension, use of strategies

  • Weekly vocabulary quizzes

  • Conventions quizzes

  • Literary terms quiz (lower Bloom’s)

  • Literary analysis quiz (higher Bloom’s)

  • Exit tickets

Unit Plan - What’s The Big Idea?


  • Reading comprehension, literary analysis, developing ideas in writing

Good readers are always thinking and using their comprehension strategies to help them derive meaning from literature, which is packed with ideas and meanings that we must figure out! By digging into what an author is doing, we can gain a better understanding and appreciation for their story, and help us develop the skills that will make us stronger writers and story tellers. As writers, we must have strong, well-developed ideas to make our work interesting to our readers.

Unit Plan – Enduring Understandings

Unit Plan – Essential Questions

Unit Plan – Tasks

To meet the standards, students will need to understand that:

  • Authors rarely come out and say exactly what they mean. They use a variety of techniques to give us clues to help us figure out the story!

  • Literature often reflects what we see and feel in real life. Good readers apply what they know to a text and allow a text to impact their thinking and feelings.
  • Stories should make sense! Authors use a structure to help them organize their work and help us make sense of their story.


  • Writers take time to develop and focus their ideas and add the detail and elaboration that makes their writing so colorful and interesting.

  • Rules and conventions of the English language aren’t just to make you crazy – we need them to make our writing easier to read and understand.

To understand, students will need to consider such questions as:

  • How can we figure out what the author really wants us to understand?

  • How does literature reflect my life and world?

  • What makes a short story great?

  • How do writers develop an idea into a powerful piece of writing?

  • How are grammar and conventions the road signs of the English language? Do good readers and writers always follow them?

What are the tasks implied by the verbs in the standards?

  • Create a written narrative that presents a well-developed idea, strong details and elaboration, and conventions (specific to this unit)

  • Read, interpret, and analyze fictional short story text for literary features such as story elements, organization, and purpose.

  • Discuss literature in teacher-student conferences, small group, and whole class seminars. Respond to literature by reflecting on personal experience and contributing relevant comments to discussion.

  • Set independent reading goals and read texts on independent reading levels. Apply metacognition strategies and create a reader’s response journal to demonstrate use of reading comprehension strategies, reflect on text, extend understanding.




Unit Plan – Achievement Targets

To understand, students will need to have knowledge of:

Literary Analysis:



  • Fiction as a genre; short story as a type of fiction

  • Literary elements, including: plot (introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution), Character/characterization, stereotypes, point of view, narrator, setting, mood, theme, style, conflict

  • Author’s purpose

  • Literary devices including: figurative language, simile, dialogue

Reading Comprehension:

  • Text-to-text connection

  • Empathy

  • Visualization/mental movie

  • Scene change

  • Sensory images

  • Expression and textual features (dashes, ellipses, italics)

  • Prediction

Writing:

  • Idea development: brainstorming, webbing, mapping

  • Narrowing focus: RAFTS – role, audience, format, topic, strong verb

  • Elaboration: details, description

  • Relevance

  • Writing process: prewriting, drafting, responding, revising, editing, publishing

  • Peer editing procedures

  • Editing marks

Conventions:

  • Sentence formation: run-ons, fragments

  • Sentence structure and punctuation (end punctuation, dialogue punctuation)

  • Paragraph structure and formation

  • Strong/weak verbs, adjectives, adverbs

Vocabulary

  • From “Thank You, Ma’am:” mistrust, barren, frail, stoop

  • From “Eleven:” alley

  • From “Charles:” renounce, swagger, raucous, insolent

  • Prefix: mis-, pre-

Listening/Speaking:


  • Presence

  • Relevance

  • Textual evidence

To understand, students will need to be able to:

Literary Analysis:



  • Classify a text into the correct genre by its distinguishing characteristics

  • Explain the author’s use of plot structure and describe how elements of plot advance the story

  • Describe the conflict of a story and how that conflict is resolved

  • Analyze characters from a variety of perspectives (based on their actions, based on thoughts, based on interactions with others, etc.)

  • Compare texts with different point-of-view and discuss the perspective that the point-of-view gives the reader

  • Discuss how the author creates mood and it’s effect on the reader

  • Determine the theme of a text

  • Explain how the author’s word choice, language and arrangement impact the text

  • Explain how the elements of literature interact (e.g., plot influences setting, character builds theme, etc.)

  • Discuss the purpose of dialogue and its effect on the text

  • Discuss the author’s use of literary devices and their effect on text

Reading Comprehension:

  • Visualize/make mental movies to strengthen comprehension

  • Describe changes in mental movies during shifts in story/scene changes

  • Use sensory images to increase comprehension

  • Make relevant text-to-self connections and discuss how connection(s) impact understanding of or experience of text

  • Describe how empathy with a character can increase understanding of text
  • Make predictions based on evidence in text


  • Determine the author’s purpose

Writing:

  • Brainstorm ideas and determine the strongest ideas to develop into a written piece using maps, webbing, and free writing

  • Narrow idea focus by using RAFTS (write appropriate to audience, format, and purpose)

  • Develop ideas by adding detail and elaboration

  • Choose strong, relevant details that strengthen the writing

  • Use the stages of the writing process to develop ideas and draft initial pieces

  • Explain the process for peer review

  • Use peer review to provide and receive relevant, constructive feedback on writing

  • Describe and follow proper publishing procedures

Conventions

  • Edit for run-on and fragmented sentences

  • Properly punctuate dialogue using correct quotation marks, commas, and end punctuation

  • Write well developed paragraphs that focus on one main idea and provide relevant supporting details

  • Use and edit for strong verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in writing

  • Use correct subject/verb agreement in writing

Vocabulary:

  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words

  • Extend vocabulary by using new words in speech and writing

Listening/Speaking:

  • Discuss literature in teacher-student conferences and small group discussions

  • Take an active role in whole class seminars

  • Contribute relevant comments to extend discussion and use evidence from text to support ideas

Steps 2 and 3: Misunderstandings & Lesson Objectives

P2(1): The teacher has translated the standards into “clear, measurable, student-centered, and rigorous objectives” (AP)


Standard

Daily Lesson Objective(s)

# of days, 1 day = xx min.

Potential Misunderstandings

Lesson Plan Notes

5.01 Increase fluency, comprehension, and insight through a meaningful and comprehensive literacy program by:

  • a. using effective reading strategies to match type of text

1.04d: Interpret how personal circumstances and background shape interaction with text

1.02d: Make connections between works, self, and related topics



  • SWBAT explain how text cues and features helps us read with expression; use text cues/features to read with expression

  • SWBAT explain how we should read dialogue with expression and why

  • SWBAT make relevant text-to-self connections and explain how those connections increase understanding of text (all)

  • SWBAT make relevant text-to-self connections and explain how feeling empathy toward a character can increase our understanding of that character/the text. (“Eleven”)

  • SWBAT describe the sensory images and details that they used to create mental images to aid their comprehension (“Eleven)

  • SWBAT describe the details that signal a change in scene in the text (“Charles)

  • SWBAT make logical predictions and use textual evidence to support their thinking (“Charles”)

10 min. each day
  • Students may think that any kind of connection is a relevant connection


  • Mini lessons w/ application to independent reading books

4.01a: Determine the purpose of the author or creator by monitoring comprehension for understanding of what is read, heard, and/or viewed.

  • SWBAT determine author’s purpose while reading a text (all)

N/A

  • Purpose discussed as we read each story (not a full day lesson)

5.01g: Interpret text by explaining elements such as plot, theme, point of view, characterization, mood, and style.

5.01i: Recognize underling messages in order to identify theme(s) within and across works

5.02d: Explore what impact literary elements have on the meaning of the text such as the influence of setting or the problem and its resolution


  • SWBAT explain why and how author’s of short stories organize the text (intro)

  • SWBAT trace a story’s development using the plot map (“TYM”)

  • SWBAT determine the theme of a story and use evidence from the text to show how the author developed the theme (“TYM”)

  • SWBAT identify a story’s point of view (all)

  • SWBAT describe the effect that point-of-view has on the reader of a story (“Eleven”)

  • SWBAT describe how authors develop characters and cite evidence from the text (“TYM”)
  • SWBAT create a character sketch of Roger that uses evidence from the text to reveal their understanding of the character (“TYM”)


  • SWBAT identify the mood of a text and use textual evidence to explain how the how the author creates the mood of a story (all)

6

  • The theme is not explicit in the text.

  • Finding point of view – don’t look in dialogue!

  • Plot structure – two days

  • Theme discussed with all stories, heavy with Thank You Ma’am

  • Character analysis: Roger in TYM, Rachel in Eleven

  • Comparison of p-o-v: How would Eleven be different if it was told from the perspective of a narrator like TYM?

5.01f: Discuss and analyze the effects on texts of such literary devices as figurative language, dialogue, flashback, and sarcasm

  • SWBAT explain how the author’s use of dialogue impacts the mood of the text in “Charles”

  • SWBAT to explain how the author’s use of simile allows readers to better understand a character’s feelings and thoughts in “Eleven”

2

 

5.01k: Explore relationships between and among characters, ideas, concepts, and/or experiences.

1.02g: Determine the main idea and/or significance of events



  • SWBAT to discuss the relationship between Roger and Ms. Luella BWJ in “Thank You, Ma’am” and how it helps develop the story’s theme
  • SWBAT explain why Ms. Luella BWJ treatment of Roger is significant to the story’s theme


1

Students may not realize that every time they read, they should be thinking about what it the main idea or why is this significant.

 

5.02a: Study the characteristics of literary genres (fiction) through reading a variety of literature and other text

5.02b: Interpret what impact genre-specific characteristics have on the meaning of the work.



  • SWBAT describe the characteristics of fiction and a short story.

  • SWBAT explain how those characteristics make the text entertaining, engaging.

1/2

 

  • Intro

4.01d: Analyze the effects of the author’s craft on the reader/viewer/listener

  • SWBAT discuss how the author’s use of first person point-of-view affects the reader of the story.

1

 

  • Teach with Eleven and comparison POV

Writing focus: idea development

Writing process focus: drafting, revising, editing, publishing

1.01: Narrate an expressive account (e.g., fictional or autobiographical) which:


  • a. Tells a story or establishes the significance of an event or events

  • b. Uses remembered feelings and specific details

6.02b: Apply proofreading symbols when editing

6.02c: Produce final drafts that demonstrate accurate spelling and the correct use of punctuation and capitalization


  • SWBAT brainstorm ideas to develop into a narrative.

  • SWBAT narrow their ideas by using RAFTS (role, audience, format, topic, strong verb).

  • SWBAT create relevant details to elaborate on their ideas.

  • SWBAT use the writing process to develop their ideas into a published narrative.

  • SWBAT explain procedures for peer review

  • SWBAT use editing symbols correctly

  • SWBAT provide relevant and constructive feedback

4

 

1.5



 

  • Model with own writing

6.02b: Apply proofreading symbols when editing

6.02c: Produce final drafts that demonstrate accurate spelling and the correct use of punctuation and capitalization



  • SWBAT brainstorm ideas to develop into a narrative.

  • SWBAT narrow their ideas by using RAFTS (role, audience, format, topic, strong verb).

  • SWBAT create relevant details to elaborate on their ideas.

  • SWBAT use the writing process to develop their ideas into a published narrative.

  • SWBAT explain procedures for peer review

  • SWBAT use editing symbols correctly

  • SWBAT provide relevant and constructive feedback

4

 

1.5



 

  • Model with own writing

6.01a: Use a variety of sentence types correctly, punctuating them properly, and avoiding fragments and run-ons (spiral)


5-10 min. each day

 

 

6.01b: Use appropriate subject-verb agreement and verb tense that are appropriate for the meaning of the sentence (spiral)

  • SWBAT use proper subject-verb agreement in writing and speech

  • SWBAT edit for subject-verb agreement

5-10 min. each day

 

  • Comparison from own writing

6.01c: Demonstrate the different roles of the parts of speech in sentence construction (spiral)

  • SWBAT edit for strong verbs, adjectives and adverbs in their writing

5-10 min. each day

 

 

6.01f: Determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary words by using context clues, a dictionary, a glossary, and/or structural analysis (roots, prefixes, suffixes) of words. 6.01g: Extend vocabulary knowledge by learning and using new words.

  • SWBAT determine the meaning of unknown words using context clues

  • SWBAT use new vocabulary words in speech and writing

5-10 min. each day


 

6.02a: Review and use common spelling rules, apply common spelling patterns, and develop and master an individualized list of words that are commonly misspelled

  • SWBAT master an individual list of spelling words

5-10 min. each day

 

 

Unit Review and Assessment

 

2.5

Formative assessments, Unit test

 

Total

 

20*

 

 

P2(2): The teacher has appropriately mapped out the objectives “ahead of time” on the calendar and has allocated time appropriately based on the content to be taught (E)

*Time reflects mini-lessons taken into account.


Step 4: Sequencing & Scaffolding Objectives on Calendar


P2(1): The teacher logically groups daily objectives based on connecting themes. (AP)

October


Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday


Thursday

Friday

1

Literary terms pretest

Pose EQs for literary unit

Reading mini-lesson


  • Good readers can categorize text according to genre.

Objectives:

  • SWBAT describe the characteristics of fiction and a short story.

  • SWBAT explain how those characteristics make the text entertaining, engaging.

2

Reading mini-lesson:

Good readers use text cues/features to read with expression



Objectives:

  • SWBAT explain why and how author’s of short stories organize the text (intro)

  • SWBAT trace a story’s development using the plot map (“TYM”)

3

Reading mini-lesson:

Good readers read dialogue with expression to really get in character



Objectives:

  • SWBAT describe how authors develop characters and cite evidence from the text (“TYM”)

  • SWBAT create a character sketch of Roger that uses evidence from the text to reveal an understanding of the character (“TYM”)

4

Reading mini-lesson:

Good readers make relevant text-to-self connections and can explain how those connections increase understanding of text



Objectives:

  • SWBAT to discuss the relationship between Roger and Ms. Luella BWJ in “Thank You, Ma’am” and how it helps develop the story’s theme

  • SWBAT explain why Ms. Luella BWJ treatment of Roger is significant to the story’s theme

5


Reading mini-lesson:

Good readers make relevant text-to-self connections and feel empathy toward characters to help them relate to what’s happening in the story



Objectives:

  • SWBAT identify a story’s point of view

  • SWBAT discuss how the author’s use of first person point-of-view affects the reader of the story.

  • SWBAT discuss how changing the point-of-view would change the overall impact of the text.

8

Reading mini-lesson:

Good readers use the sensory images and details in the text to create mental movies to aid their comprehension



Objectives:

  • SWBAT explain why author’s use figurative language and identify similes in text

  • SWBAT to explain how the author’s use of simile allows readers to better understand a character’s feelings and thoughts in “Eleven”

9

Reading mini-lesson:

Good readers look for connections across story elements



Objectives:

  • SWBAT identify a story’s point of view.

  • SWBAT explain how the author’s use of dialogue impacts the mood of the text in “Charles”

10

Reading mini-lesson:

Good readers use clues in the text to make a prediction



Objectives:

  • SWBAT describe and compare the Charles and Laurie using evidence from the text

  • SWBAT make logical predictions and use textual evidence to support their thinking (“Charles”)

11

Vocabulary quiz

TBD based on trends from reading conferences

Targeted reteaching (based on exit tickets, class work, observation)


12

Unit test: Literary analysis assessment

 


15

Hand back unit test, have students track mastery

Pose EQs for writing unit

Mini-lesson


  • SWBAT use proper subject-verb agreement in writing and speech

Objectives:

  • SWBAT reflect on the short stories we read and discuss potential ways that authors develop ideas for their writing

  • SWBAT brainstorm ideas to develop into a narrative

16

Mini-lesson:

SWBAT use proper end punctuation in sentences



Objectives:

  • SWBAT narrow their ideas by using RAFTS (role, audience, format, topic, strong verb).

  • SWBAT choose their strongest idea to develop during drafting

17

Mini-lesson:

SWBAT edit for strong verbs, adjectives and adverbs in their writing



Objectives:

  • SWBAT describe how Sandra Cisneros used detail and description to make her writing more interesting

  • SWBAT create relevant details to elaborate on their ideas.

18

Mini-lesson:

SWBAT modify a paragraph so that it focuses on one topic and includes only relevant details



Objectives:

  • SWBAT use the writing process to develop their ideas into a draft of their narrative.

19

Conventions quiz



Mini-lesson:

SWBAT punctuate dialogue correctly



Objectives:
  • SWBAT explain how dialogue can be used to help develop their ideas and/or characters


  • SWBAT use the writing process to develop their ideas into a draft of their narrative.

  • (Students turn in draft for feedback from me)

22

Return drafts



Mini-lesson:

SWBAT use editing symbols correctly



Objectives:

  • SWBAT describe why authors use peer review and explain class procedures for peer review

  • SWBAT compare examples of strong constructive feedback and weak constructive feedback and describe how the type of feedback would affect the writer’s work.

(Additional drafting time as needed)

23

Mini-lesson:

Mini-lesson: SWBAT provide constructive feedback by asking the writer questions and offering specific suggestions



Objectives:

  • Objectives: SWBAT provide relevant and constructive feedback by peer reviewing a writer’s work for clarity of ideas and supporting details

  • SWBAT discuss their writing with their peer review partner and reflect on their comments

24

Mini-lesson:

SWBAT explain helpful techniques that authors use when revising their work; explain our revising procedures

SWBAT provide relevant and constructive feedback by peer reviewing a writer’s work for strong verbs, adjectives, and adverbs; sentence formation and punctuation, and subject-verb agreement

SWBAT revise their work based on constructive feedback from their peers



25

Mini-lesson:

TBD: based on trends from writing conferences, observations

SWBAT revise their work based on feedback from their peers

SWBAT publish their narrative

(flex time: students may want to share work with peers after revising, may want to start brainstorming for next written piece, etc.)


26

Mini-lesson:

TBD: based on trends from writing conferences, observations

SWBAT publish their narrative

(flex time: students may want to share work with peers after revising, may want to start brainstorming for next written piece, etc.)



Narrative due

 

 

 


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