Unit Planning Organizer Grade: 4 Unit: 4 Created By: Diana Van Hal- 4th grade teacher Carrie Moberg- 4th grade teacher Leigh McEwen- aea quality Learning Consultant Note



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Unit Planning Organizer


Grade: 4

Unit: 4

Created By:

Diana Van Hal- 4th grade teacher

Carrie Moberg- 4th grade teacher

Leigh McEwen- AEA Quality Learning Consultant

Note: Teachers are strongly encouraged to look at the UPO for the context of assessments.

Table of Contents

Step 1: Unit Standards …………………………………………………….……………………………………………………………………… p. 3

Iowa Core Standards- Priority Standards ……………………………………………….………………………………………. p. 3

Iowa Core Standards- Support Standards ……………………………………………………………………………..……….. p. 3

Reading Standards Unwrapped and Depth of Knowledge ……………………………………………………………... p. 4

Writing Standards Unwrapped and Depth of Knowledge ………………………………………………………………. p. 4

Speaking/Listening Standards Unwrapped and Depth of Knowledge……………………………………………… p. 5

Unit Essential Questions and Big Ideas ……………………….………………………………………………………………... p. 6

Step 2: Standards-Based Unit Assessments ……………………………………………………………………………………………. p. 6

Assessment and Performance Task Alignment of Unit Standards ………………………………………………….. p. 6

Standards-Based Common Formative Pre and Post-Assessment (CFA)

Teacher Directions, Student Directions and Answers ..……………………………………………………. p. 6

Step 3: Standards-Based Performance Tasks …………………………………………………………………………………………. p. 6

Performance Task Synopses ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….... p. 6

Performance Task 1- In Detail ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. p. 9

Performance Task 2- In Detail ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. p. 10

Performance Task 3- In Detail …………………………….…………………………………………………………………………p. 12

Performance Task 4- In Detail .………………………………………………………………………………………………………p. 13

Student Materials …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. p. 15

Checklists for Foundational Skills, Language, and Speaking and Listening ………………………………………………p.20-22


Notes:


  • Support standards may be embedded in performance tasks. If they are not embedded, they must be assessed through teacher-designed classroom measures.

  • Supporting standards will not be embedded in common formative pre/post assessments.


Unit Planning Organizer

Note: All supporting documents for Standards-Based CFAs and Performance Tasks are located at the end of the Unit Planning Organizer.

Subject(s)

ELA

Grade/Course

4th Grade

Title of Standards-Based Unit

Story Narrative

Estimated Duration of Unit

Approximately 5 weeks

Unit Placement in Scope & Sequence

1

2

3

oval 14

5

6

Step 1: Unit Standards

Iowa Core Standards- Priority Standards (to be instructed and assessed)


RL.4.2

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. (DOK 2, 3)

RL.4. 3

Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). (DOK, 1, 2, 3)

RL.4.5

Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text. (DOK 1, 2, 3)

RL.4.7

Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral representation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. (DOK 2, 3, 4)

RL.4.9

Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. (DOK 3, 4)


W.4.3

a, b, c, d


Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and evens or show the responses of characters to situations.

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events.

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.


SL.4.1

a, b, c, d

Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (One-one-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a. Come to discussions prepared having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.



d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.



Iowa Core Standards- Support Standards (to be instructed and assessed)


Note: Not all supporting standards will be measured through Standards-Based CFA or Performance Task listed below.


RL.4.4; RL.4.6; W.4.6; SL.4.2; SL.4.5; L.4.1d; L.4.2b




Reading Standards

Priority Standard

Unwrapped” Skills

(students need to be able to do)

(verbs and verb phrases)

Unwrapped” Concepts

(students need to know)

(noun/noun phrases)

Depth of Knowledge/

Bloom’s Levels

RL.4.2

  • Refer

  • Explaining

  • Drawing inferences

  • Details and examples

  • Explicit

1,2,3

RL.4.3

  • Describe in depth

  • Draw on

  • Character

  • Setting

  • Event

  • Story or drama

  • Specific details in the text

1, 2, 3


RL.4.5

  • Explain major differences

  • Refer to




  • Difference between poems, drama, and prose

  • Structural elements of poems

  • Structural elements of drama

1, 2, 3

RL.4.7

  • Make connections

  • Identifying

  • Text of a story

  • Visual or oral presentation

  • Specific descriptions and directions in the text

2, 3, 4

RL.4.9

  • Compare

  • Contrast

  • Similar themes and topics

  • Patterns of events

  • Stories, myths, traditional literature from different cultures

3, 4

Writing Standards

Priority Standard

Unwrapped” Skills

(students need to be able to do)

(verbs and verb phrases)

Unwrapped” Concepts

(students need to know)

(noun/noun phrases)

Depth of Knowledge/

Bloom’s Levels


W.4.3

  • Write

  • Develop

  • Using




  • Narratives

  • Real or imagined experiences or events

  • Effective technique

  • Descriptive details

  • Clear event sequences.

3, 4

W.4.3a

  • Establishing a situation

  • Narrator and/or characters

  • Event sequence that unfold naturally




W.4.3b

  • Use

  • Develop

  • Show

  • Dialogue

  • Description

  • Experiences and events

  • Responses of characters to situations




W.4.3c

  • Use

  • Manage

  • Variety of transitional words and phrases

  • Sequence of events



W.4.3d


  • Use

  • Convey

  • Concrete words and phrases

  • Sensory details

  • Experiences and events






Speaking and Listening Standards

Priority Standard

Unwrapped” Skills

(students need to be able to do)

(verbs and verb phrases)

Unwrapped” Concepts

(students need to know)

(noun/noun phrases)

Depth of Knowledge/

Bloom’s Levels

SL.4.1

  • Engage effectively

  • Build on

  • Expressing

  • Collaborative discussions

  • Diverse partners

  • Each others’ ideas

1, 2, 3

SL.4.1a

  • Come

  • Explicitly draw

  • Explore

  • Prepared

  • Preparation- read/studied

  • Ideas under discussion


SL.4.1b


  • Follow

  • Carry out

  • Agreed-upon rules

  • Assigned roles




SL.4.1c

  • Pose

  • Respond

  • Clarify

  • Follow-up

  • Make comments

  • Link

  • Specific questions

  • Information

  • Remarks of others




SL.4.1d

  • Review

  • Explain

  • Key ideas

  • Own ideas






Unit Essential Question and Enduring Understandings

Essential Questions

Big Ideas

How do authors teach life lessons through their stories?

Why is it important to discuss what you are reading and writing about with others?




We can learn life lessons from the stories we read, stories we write, and conversations we have with others.

Why do writers decide to write stories in a certain way?



Writers tell stories in different ways to appeal to and reach many different readers.

Step 2: Standards-Based Unit Assessments

Assessment and Performance Task Alignment of Unit Standards



Assessment/Performance Task

Assessed Standards

Pre CFA(s)

RL 4.2 *(The summarizing portion of 4.2 is assessed in Unit 1 & Unit 4), RL.4.3, RL.4.5

Performance Task #1

RL.4.9, SL.4.1 a-d

Performance Task #2

W.4.3 a-e

Performance Task #3

RL.4.7

Performance Task #4

RL.4.9

Post CFA

RL 4.2 *(The summarizing portion of 4.2 is assessed in Unit 1 & Unit 4), RL.4.3, RL.4.5




Standards-Based Common Formative Pre and Post-Assessment (CFA) and possible answer key

Text is located in student materials at the end of the Unit Planner.

Standards: RL.4.2, RL.4.3, RL.4.5

Suggested/Possible Answer Key for CFA (Located at end of planner)
1a. What is the theme of the drama? (RL.4.2) – POSSIBLE ANSWER (Please accept anything that a student can support with details and examples from the text)

  • Generosity can be rewarded

1b. Support your answer using details and examples as evidence from the text:

Details /Examples from the text:


  • The Baker says, “In this shop, from now on, a dozen is thirteen.” The woman responded, “You have learned to count well. You will surely be rewarded.

  • When people heard that he gave 13 when people paid for a dozen, he had more customers than ever/

  • The Baker grew very wealthy and other bakers in town began doing the same.

2. Summarize the drama. (RL.4.2): (Accept reasonable summaries)

3. Pick a character from the drama.



Character: Woman or Baker

Describe the character (thoughts, words, actions) in depth using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)-

(Only need one or the other)- accept all reasonable answers.


Woman

Baker

She thinks a dozen is 13 (thought and words)- She says, “But I say that a dozen is thirteen. Give me one more.”

She is stubborn- when the baker won’t give her 13, she says he can keep his cookies. And she left.

She believes in generosity- she tells the baker that his heart is small and his fist is tight.


He is honest- she asked for a dozen and he counts out twelve. He tells her that his customers get exactly what they pay for—not more, and not less.

The baker pays attention to his dream, which could mean he is superstitious. He changes his ways and begins to give 13 cookies whenever his customers order a dozen.

The baker is wealthy at the end because of his generosity. He had more customers than ever before.


4. Identify and describe an event from the drama (RL.4.3):

Use details and examples as evidence from the text to support your thinking:



Possible Event: Woman visiting the bakery at the beginning of the drama.

When the woman visited the baker the first time she demanded that he give her 13 cookies when she orders a dozen. He tells her that his customers get exactly what they pay for and that a dozen is 12. She gets upset and leaves without the cookies. When she leaves, she almost casts a spell on the baker when she says, “Van Amsterdam! However honest you may be, your heart is small and your fist is tight. Fall again, mount again, learn how to count again!” Then she was gone.


Possible Event: Baker having a dream

The baker had a dream about when he was a boy. St. Nicholas was handing out gifts to the children and realized that the more he gave, the more he had to give. He never ran out. When St. Nicholas got to Van Amsterdam, he saw that the gift he was handing out was his very own St. Nicholas cookies. He then saw that it wasn’t St. Nicholas at all; it was the woman from his bakery. When he woke up, he asked himself why not give more?


Possible Event: Woman visiting the bakery again.

The woman comes back to the bakery to buy a dozen of the Saint Nicholas cookies. This time the baker gives her 13 when she orders a dozen. The woman is happy and tells the baker that he will be rewarded.

5. Describe the setting in depth. (RL.4.3) Use details and examples as evidence from the text to support your thinking:

The setting is in the Dutch colonial town, which is now Albany, New York. The drama happens in Van Amsterdam’s bakery in December, right before St. Nicholas Day.


6. Explain the major differences between drama and prose. Use a Venn diagram, t-chart, or create your own graphic organizer to show the differences. (RL.4.5)



Scoring Guide: RL.4.2 (Q 1,2)

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

  • Identifies the theme.

  • Gives details to support the theme.

  • Summarize the drama.

  • Meets 2 of the proficient criteria.

  • Meets fewer than 2 of the proficient criteria.

Comments:


Scoring Guide: RL.4.3 (Q 3,4,5)


Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

  • Describes the character in depth using details from the text.

  • Describes the event in depth using details from the text.

  • Describes the setting in depth using details from the text.

  • Meets 2 out of 3 of the proficient criteria.

  • Meets fewer than 2 of the proficient criteria.

Comments:



Scoring Guide: RL.4.5 (Q 6)

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

  • Explains differences between prose and drama by referring to structural elements.




  • Meets fewer than 1 of the proficient criteria.

Comments:


Step 3: Standards-Based Performance Tasks

Performance Task Synopses

Standards: RL.4.7, RL.4.9, SL.4.1 a-d, W.4.3

Big Idea:


  • We can learn life lessons from the stories we read, stories we write, and conversations we have with others.

  • Writers tell stories in different ways to appeal to and reach many different readers.


Essential Questions:

  • How do authors teach life lessons through their stories?

  • Why is it important to discuss what you are reading and writing about with others?

  • Why do writers decide to write stories in a certain way?


Engaging Scenario:

The guidance counselor is really busy and needs your help to teach a group of younger students at our school a life lesson. Your job is to create, write, and perform a drama with a partner that has a strong theme and teaches a life lesson.



Task 1:  Students will be brainstorming ideas of possible themes and life lessons to include in their dramas. Students will work in pairs to choose a theme and life lesson to share with a younger audience.  

Students will complete a prewrite web, list, or graphic organizer to organize their thinking. 



Task 2:  Partners will create a rough draft of their drama, including:

  • introducing a narrator and/or casts of characters

  • organize a sequence of events using a variety of transitional words and phrases

  • using dialogue

  • using concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events

  • using descriptions to develop experiences and events

  • incorporate stage directions

  • provide a conclusion

Task 3: Partners will work with other students in the class to peer edit/revise others’ writings.  

During this task, students will individually create a visual product of the drama to demonstrate understanding.


Task 4: Students will publish their final dramas and present their dramas to a younger group of students.  Presentations will focus on identifying themes and lessons learned, and comparing and contrasting the themes.





Performance Task # 1- In Detail

Suggested Engaging Scenario:

The guidance counselor is really busy and needs your help to teach a group of younger students at our school a life lesson. Your job is to create, write, and perform a drama with a partner that has a strong theme and teaches a life lesson.


Priority Standards: RL.4.9, SL.4.1a-d
Big Idea:

  • We can learn life lessons from the stories we read, stories we write, and conversations we have with others.


Essential Questions:

  • How do authors teach life lessons through their stories?

  • Why is it important to discuss what you are reading and writing about with others?


DOK: 1, 2, & 3
Synopsis: Task 1:  Students will research stories, myths and traditional literature, identifying similar themes, topics, and patterns of events. Then, students will brainstorm ideas of possible themes and life lessons to include in their dramas. Students will work in pairs to choose a theme and life lesson to share with a younger audience.  

Students will complete a prewrite web, list, or graphic organizer to organize their thinking. 


Teacher Directions:
  • Provide students with a variety of stories, myths and traditional literature from different cultures.


  • Provide students with the Theme Comparison graphic organizer (in student materials section of the planner).

  • Students complete individual prewrite web, list, or graphic organizer to organize their thinking. This is the product from Task 1 that will be scored to determine proficiency of the standards.

  • Use the Speaking and Listening check list (from Unit 1) to score students during the partner work.


Student Directions:

  • You will be researching stories, myths and traditional literature, which use similar themes and topics, and patterns of events.  

  • With your partner, brainstorm possible themes and life lessons to include in your drama.

  • Choose a theme and life lesson to share with a younger audience

  • Individually complete a prewrite web, list, or graphic organizer to organize your thinking. 




Scoring Guide RL.4.7

Exemplary

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:


  • Compares and contrasts similar themes and topics.

  • Compares and contrasts similar patterns of events.

Meets 1 of the proficient criteria.


Meets none of the proficient criteria.

Comments:


Scoring Guide SL.4.1.a-d

Exemplary

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:


  • Comes to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material.

  • Draws on preparation and other information known about the topic.

  • Explores ideas in discussion.

  • Follows agreed-upon rules for discussions and carries out assigned role(s)

  • Poses specific questions

  • Responds to specific questions to follow up on information

  • Makes comments to contribute to discussion

  • Links ideas to the remarks of others.

  • Explains their own ideas in light of the discussions

Meets 7 of the proficient criteria.

Meets fewer than 7 of the proficient criteria.

Comments:





Performance Task # 2- In Detail

Suggested Engaging Scenario: The guidance counselor is really busy and needs your help to teach a group of younger students at our school a life lesson. Your job is to create, write, and perform a drama with a partner that has a strong theme and teaches a life lesson.
Priority Standards: W.4.3 a-e


Big Ideas: Writers tell stories in different ways to appeal to and reach different readers.

Essential Questions: Why do writers decide to write stories in a certain way?

DOK: 3, 4
Synopsis: Partners will create a rough draft of their drama.
Teacher Directions:


  • Provide a peer editing checklist to students (from Unit 1).


Student Directions:

You and your partner will create a rough draft of your drama, including:



  • introducing a narrator and/or casts of characters

  • organize a sequence of events using a variety of transitional words and phrases

  • using dialogue

  • using concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events

  • using descriptions to develop experiences and events

  • incorporate stage directions

  • provide a conclusion




Scoring Guide W.4.3.a

Exemplary

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient


All proficient criteria plus:



  • Orients reader by establishing a 

real situation 

  • Introduces a narrator and/or 

characters   

  • Organizes an event sequence 

that unfolds naturally  

Meets 2 of the proficient criteria.

Meets fewer than 2 of the proficient criteria.

Comments:


Scoring Guide W.4.3.b

Exemplary

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:



  • Uses dialogue to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

  • Uses description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

Meets 1 of the proficient criteria.

Meets none of the proficient criteria.

Comments:


Scoring Guide W.4.3.c

Exemplary


Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:



  • Uses a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events.

Meets none of the proficient criteria.

Comments:


Scoring Guide W.4.3.d

Exemplary

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:



  • Uses concrete words and phrases to convey experiences and events precisely.

  • Uses sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

Meets 1 of the proficient criteria.

Meets none of the proficient criteria.

Comments:


Scoring Guide W.4.3.e

Exemplary

Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:




  • Provides a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.




Meets none of the proficient criteria.

Comments:




Performance Task # 3- In Detail

Suggested Engaging Scenario: The guidance counselor is really busy and needs your help to teach a group of younger students at our school a life lesson. Your job is to create, write, and perform a drama with a partner that has a strong theme and teaches a life lesson.
Priority Standards: RL.4.7


Big Idea:

  • We can learn life lessons from the stories we read, stories we write, and conversations we have with others.


Essential Questions:

  • How do authors teach life lessons through their stories?

  • Why is it important to discuss what you are reading and writing about with others?


DOK: 2, 3, 4
Synopsis: Partners will work with other students in the class to peer edit/revise others’ writings.  

During this task, students will individually create a visual product of the drama to demonstrate understanding.


Teacher Directions:
  • Consider providing a peer-editing checklist to your students: http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/printouts/Editing%20Checklist.pdf



Student Directions:

  • With your partner, edit another group’s drama. Did they:

  • introduce a narrator and/or casts of characters

  • organize a sequence of events using a variety of transitional words and phrases

  • use dialogue

  • use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events

  • use descriptions to develop experiences and events

  • incorporate stage directions

  • provide a conclusion

  • use correct conventions (spelling, capitalization, quotation marks, etc.)

Scoring Guide RL.4.7

Exemplary

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:

  • Makes connections by identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions of the drama.




Meets none of the proficient criteria.

Comments:





Performance Task # 4- In Detail

Suggested Engaging Scenario: The guidance counselor is really busy and needs your help to teach a group of younger students at our school a life lesson. Your job is to create, write, and perform a drama with a partner that has a strong theme and teaches a life lesson.

Priority Standards: RL.4.9
Big Idea:


  • We can learn life lessons from the stories we read, stories we write, and conversations we have with others.


Essential Questions:

  • How do authors teach life lessons through their stories?

  • Why is it important to discuss what you are reading and writing about with others?


DOK: 3, 4

Synopsis: Students will publish their final dramas and present their dramas to a younger group of students.  Presentations will focus on identifying themes and lessons learned, and comparing and contrasting these them
Teacher Directions:

  • Arrange for the students to present their dramas to younger classes.

  • Provide opportunities for students to practice presenting their dramas to other students in the class. Consider having one group evaluate another group’s theme using the Theme Comparison graphic organizer (same from task #1).

  • Use the completed organizer to assess proficiency of the standard.


Student Directions:

  • Publish your drama, using the suggestions from your peer editors.

  • Practice presenting your drama to another group.

  • Watch a group presenting to you and your partner. Complete the Theme Comparison graphic organizer comparing your theme to the other group’s theme.

Present your drama to a younger group of students. “Break a leg!"

Scoring Guide RL.4.9


Exemplary

Proficient

Close to Proficient

Far from Proficient

All proficient criteria plus:



  • Compares and contrasts the treatment of similar themes and topics in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

  • Compares and contrasts the patterns of events in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

Meet 1 of the proficient criteria

Meets none of the proficient criteria.

Comments:



Student Documents and Supporting Materials


Common Formative Assessment

Unit 4  4th grade

Name:________________________________




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