United nations development assistance framework 2007-2009 (undaf) mozambique maputo



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Country Team Programme Outcomes

Country Programme Outputs

Role of Implementing / Collaborating Partners


Resource mobilization Targets in US$

Over 3 years


2.3. Access to and use of safe drinking water and adequate sanitation for rural communities and urban slums increased



2.3.1 Decentralised planning and financial management guidelines under the national water policy implemented in 8 municipalities (UNICEF, UNDP)
2.3.2 Planning, monitoring, and evaluation systems for drinking water and sanitation operationalised in five provinces (UNICEF, UNDP)
2.3.3 At least 1,000,000 additional users among vulnerable groups have access to and use safe water and appropriate sanitation and improved hygiene practices (UNICEF, WHO)

2.3.4 Strengthened capacity of the water sector for emergency preparedness and response to reduce mortality and morbidity levels in districts affected by natural disasters and high cholera incidence (UNICEF, WHO, UNDP)




Government: Ministry of Public Works (MOPH) and National Water Directorate (DNA) will set national strategies and policies and coordinate planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation and prepare and evaluate procurement processes. GoM to commit to increased Budget allocation to the Water Sector.
Civil Society: Involvement of NGOs and CBOs in hygiene promotion, self-help construction of household sanitation facilities and operation and maintenance of water schemes. The private sector will be involved in the design, construction and technical supervision.
Bilateral and multi-lateral development partners: Support coordination, information sharing, medium/long term strategic planning, including National Policy and Guidelines reviews and setting up of effective monitoring and evaluation systems at the national and sub-national levels; resource leveraging for water and sanitation particularly for poor urban areas.



UNICEF:

US$ 3,100,000 (RR) US$ 18,900,000 (OR)


WHO:

US$ 15,000 (RR)

US$ 50,000 (OR)
UNDP:

Financial resource referred to in the Governance Matrix


FAO:

US$ 300,000 (RR)






Country Team Programme Outcomes

Country Programme Outputs


Role of Implementing / Collaborating Partners


Resource mobilization Targets in US$

Over 3 years


2.4. National and sub-national level capacity increased to implement the National Strategy on Food Security and Nutrition


2.4.1 Strengthened capacity of SETSAN to coordinate and implement the National Strategy on Food Security and Nutrition (FAO, UNICEF, WFP, WHO)
2.4.2 Improved availability at household level of diversified food types (including fortified food) (FAO, WFP, UNICEF)
2.4.3 Underweight prevalence is reduced by 5% and vitamin A deficiency by 10% in 90 districts through the implementation of the Community and Health Facility Basic Nutrition Packages (UNICEF, WFP, FAO, WHO)
2.4.4 Strengthened capacity of SETSAN for emergency preparedness and response for timely response to acute food and nutrition insecurity to prevent increased morbidity and mortality in all provinces (WHO, WFP, FAO, UNICEF)
2.4.5 Disparities in malnutrition prevalence between vulnerable groups (OVC and PLWHA) and the general population reduced by half through the implementation of targeted interventions in 6 provinces (FAO, UNICEF, WHO, WFP).


Government: MISAU will set national strategies and policies and coordinate planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, in the area of nutrition. GoM to commit to addressing the high level of malnutrition through a coordinated approach by implementing the national FSN strategy, empowering SETSAN and increasing State Budget allocation.

Civil Society: Non-governmental organisations and other civil society organisations to support delivery of services, paying special attention to vulnerable groups.
Bilateral and multi-lateral development partners: Leverage and allocate adequate funds for the identified for addressing vulnerabilities; provide financial support and technical assistance.



FAO:

US$ 500,000 (RR)

US$ 5,000,000 (OR)
UNICEF:

US$ 1,200,000 (RR) US$ 2,400,000 (OR)


WHO:

US$ 29,000 (RR)

US$ 50,000 (OR)
WFP:

US$ 900,000 (OR)








Country Team Programme Outcomes

Country Programme Outputs

Role of Implementing / Collaborating Partners


Resource mobilization Targets in US$

Over 3 years


2.5. Social protection safety nets for the most disadvantaged are strengthened and expanded

2.5.1 National policy and strategy formulated that integrates safety net interventions, including cash transfer, by Government and partners and promotes the allocation of adequate budgets for social safety net programmes (UNICEF, WFP, FAO)

2.5.2 In 7 provinces, comprehensive models are established and operationalised that create local demand for and access to high quality safety net interventions (UNICEF, WFP, FAO).



Government: Ministry of Women and Social Action (MMAS – National Institute for Social Action, INAS) to revise eligibility criteria for governmental social protection schemes; develop and test effective mechanisms for the implementation of social protection schemes in coordination with civil society organisation. Advocate for budgetary allocations (under the State’s Budget) for the expansion of cash transfer schemes.
Civil Society: International and national NGOs and CBOs to coordinate with Governmental partners for the identification and referral of beneficiaries for social protection schemes.
Bilateral and multi-lateral development partners: Provide financial and technical support to MMAS for the rollout of safety net programmes (including direct support to Provincial Governmental partners).




UNICEF:

US$ 1,200,000 (RR) US$ 3,700,000 (OR)


WFP:

US$ 500,000 (OR)


FAO:

US$ 500,000 (RR)






Coordination Mechanisms and Programme Modalities

Within the framework of the PARPA II (2006-2009), the GoM 5-Year Plan (2005-2009) and sectoral plans, the UN will use existing coordination mechanisms in each sector to ensure that the UNDAF results are achieved. The Programme Aid Partnership (PAP) mechanisms for joint review and evaluation will be used, through concerted and coordinated participation of UN agencies. Joint programming modalities to reach the UNDAF results will be used by UN agencies contributing to the joint UNDAF outcome and outputs.

Education: The UN will use existing coordination mechanisms in the Education sector (CP partners - Education SWAP) to support the implementation of the ESSP II and ensure that the UNDAF results are met. While exact modalities for joint programming have not yet been defined, this includes: (i) Support to MEC for implementing the Child Friendly Schools programme, including school feeding (UNICEF and WFP). Other joint programming opportunities will be defined in the course of 2006. Agencies’ specific contributions are outlined below:
FAO: Support the empowerment of orphaned and vulnerable children through agriculture and life skills (Junior Farmer Field and Life Skills Schools); support the strengthening of children’s environmental awareness and healthy living through Garden Based Learning in primary schools in three provinces.
UNESCO: Provide technical and financial support for the mapping of the missing out and in particular the girls and promotion of girls’ participation in science, technical and vocational education; build capacity for the promotion of literacy for empowerment initiative; link formal and non-formal basic education for synergy and contribution to quality basic education, in particular for learners in rural Mozambique.

UNICEF: Capacity building support to MEC and DNA at national and sub-national levels for improved planning, M&E and service delivery; support the provision of water points and separate sanitation facilities in targeted schools in the seven targeted districts, the establishment of child-to-child sanitation committees, hygiene education programmes, school health, and screening for physical readiness to learn; outreach activities to identify and enrol girls and OVC, monitor attendance for retention, provide materials, psycho-social support and birth registration certificates and referrals to other service providers; capacity building for emergency preparedness and response.

WFP: Provide services and resources for day-school feeding and take-home rations to build models for Government ownership, and assist MEC in the development and operationalisation of a National School Feeding Programme; continued support to PTAs and monitoring in schools; support to MEC and INGC in districts vulnerable to natural disasters.
WHO: Collaborate with MoH and UNFPA in the training of teachers in Health Promotion School Initiative (HPSI) in one province to be indicated by the MoH.

Health: The UN will use existing co-ordination mechanisms in the Health Sector (SWAP) to support the implementation of the National Health Policy Declaration and the PESS and ensure that the UNDAF results are met. Co-ordination among UN agencies will be strengthened through the appointment of a UN Health Advisor that will operate under the Resident Co-ordinator Office, and whose main task will be to represent the UN family in the Health SWAp process. Joint programming opportunities include: (i) UNFPA and WHO on developing RH policy and guidelines with WHO as Managing Agent; (ii) UNICEF, WHO, UNFPA on developing an HIS policy with WHO as Managing Agent; (iii) WHO and UNFPA on access to quality SRH services (specifically training) with UNFPA as Managing Agent; (iv) WHO and UNICEF on developing a framework for comprehensive child health policy including newborn, with WHO as Managing Agent; (v) WHO and UNICEF on joint implementation of an integrated child health and nutrition package at community level with UNICEF as Managing Agent; (vi) UNICEF and WHO will jointly support MoH in the planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the EPI RED (Reach Every District) approach, especially focusing on low coverage areas, with UNICEF as Managing Agent. Other joint-programming opportunities will be defined in the course of 2006. Agencies’ specific contributions are outlined below:

UNFPA: Provide technical assistance at central level for the development of national policies, strategies and plans, as well as revision/update of existing norms, standards, guidelines and procedures for services provision; support to conduct a National Maternal Health Needs Assessment, including dissemination of its results for policy dialogue/influence; at provincial level, support to implement EmOC training. Furthermore, UNFPA will consistently advocate mainstreaming of SRH on the MISAU and SWAP agenda, as well as ensuring a sufficient share of Common Funding allocations for RH/MMR Programme implementation.
UNICEF: Provide technical assistance in the development of policies and plans at both central and local levels, while at the same time advocating for the hard-to-reach and most vulnerable groups and adequate resource allocation; support the monitoring and supervision of training activities and micro-planning; some key supplies could be purchased, and some operational cost may be covered, especially during the start-up-phases; development, production and dissemination of IEC materials; coordination with UN and other civil society partners will be actively sought, especially in the area of emergency preparedness and response.

WHO: Provide technical assistance for the development of the policy and strategies related to reproductive Health Policy (SHR/MMR) and Child Health; for performing SWOT analysis of the health information system, and identifying technical and financial assistance needed for development of specific sub-components of health information system; for updating IMCI training tools; for developing or revising RH /EmOc norms, standards and procedures for service delivery; and for developing emergency preparedness and response plans for epidemic prone diseases and health effects of disasters; Advocacy for regular supervision at all levels with focus at district level, operational research, monitoring of interventions, implementation of evidence based WHO recommended strategies like Home based treatment/care; support to the implementation of priority interventions through training, monitoring, transport, social mobilization, mobile brigades, procurement of ACTs and kits for provincial rapid response teams) with the aim of achieving tangible results in terms of health gains.

WFP: Support the integration of potential health emergencies in the National Contingency Plan; support to INGC in districts affected by cholera and natural disasters.
Water: The UN will use existing co-ordination mechanisms in the Water Sector (SWAP, GAS WG) to support the implementation of the National Water Policy and ensure that UNDAF results are met. Joint programming opportunities will be defined in the course of 2006. Agencies’ specific contributions are outlined below:
UNICEF: Provide institutional support for planning, monitoring, evaluation and improved service delivery in targeted districts; provide technical assistance for emergency assistance and mitigation including rehabilitation of water facilities and the development of a mid-long term plan on water management in drought prone areas.
WHO: Provide technical assistance to support the development of plans, financial support for training, and kits for provincial rapid response teams.

Food Security and Nutrition: The UN will use existing co-ordination mechanisms operating under SETSAN to support the implementation of the national Food Security and Nutrition Strategy and ensure that UNDAF results are met. The capacity of these co-ordination mechanisms will be strengthened. The UN Nutrition Group will continue to meet to discuss technical issues and work towards a closer collaboration of support to SETSAN and the MISAU Nutrition unit. The UN disaster management team will also continue to work in close collaboration supporting the INGC national monitoring of natural disasters, developing emergency preparedness plans and coordinating any required response in times of need. While exact modalities for joint programming have not yet been defined, these will include: (i) SETSAN capacity building (WFP, UNICEF and FAO); (ii) Capacity building of INGC for disaster management and contingency planning (WFP, UNICEF and UNDP); (iii) Supplementary feeding programmes (UNICEF and WFP). Other joint programming opportunities will be defined in the course of 2006. Agencies’ specific contributions are outlined below:

FAO: Capacity building of SETSAN staff at national and provincial level; technical support on FSN for capacity building, monitoring, evaluation and policy intervention; technical support on use of tools and methodologies to improve the understanding of household consumption pattern and dietary condition; training of trainers on best nutrition practices; technical support on vulnerability assessment; support on national information system for multisectoral information on food security and nutrition; support integration of food and nutrition security in PDD; support development and implementation of drought mitigation plan including trade fair; build capacity of CBOs, government and civil society to improve nutrition and health education in schools and at community and HH level; technical support to improve food security and livelihoods of poor HH through agricultural training, investments in micro-projects, community based natural resource planning and land related conflict resolution.
UNICEF: Technical support on issues related to nutrition, capacity building, support to policy and strategy development, M&E, advocacy and communication; financial and supplies support to the MoH and SETSAN; facilitation of improved multi-sectoral linkages and use of multi-sectoral data in the development and implementation of interventions to reduce FSN vulnerability; technical assistance for vulnerability monitoring.
WFP: Provide resources and technical assistance in relation to the national capacity to produce, purchase and distribute fortified foods and CSB, among others in supplementary feeding activities; continued support to SETSAN in line with requests against the annual action plans and for vulnerability assessments.

WHO: Technical support in implementation and assistance to MoH for regular monitoring of the sentinel sites.

Protection and safety nets: Within the framework of the PARPA II and to some extent the Action Plan for OVC, the UN will support the Government to establish formal co-ordination mechanisms through the strengthening of MMAS and the MPD capacity. Joint programming opportunities include: (i) WFP and UNICEF for prevention of sexual exploitation, with UNICEF as the managing agent. While exact modalities for other joint programming have not yet been defined, other opportunities include: (ii) Support comprehensive, integrated Safety Net Systems (WFP and UNICEF). Other joint programming opportunities will be defined in the course of 2006. Agencies’ specific contributions are outlined below:
UNICEF: Provide support to MMAS/INAS in the development and implementation of the policy; provide technical support to define standards and mechanisms for the delivery of safety nets, pilot comprehensive models and build capacities of provincial and district level stakeholders through ongoing training (linked to Outcome 1.4 under HIV/AIDS Pillar).
WFP: Provide food resources to safety net activities through the PRRO (relief component), which will promote models for Government ownership; these resources are additional to those mentioned under resource mobilisation targets, which are only those dedicated exclusively to technical assistance and training for increase national capacity to establish and manage a national safety net system.




UNDAF OUTCOME 3: HIV AND AIDS Result Matrix

MDG(s): Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases





NATIONAL PRIORITIES:
National Multisectoral Strategic Plan to Combat HIV/AIDS 2005-2009 (PEN II) - the operational framework of PARPA II

  • Prevention: To reduce the number of new infections from the current level of 500 a day among adults to 350 in 5-years and 150 in 10-years

  • Advocacy: Transform the fight against HIV/AIDS into a national emergency

  • Stigma and Discrimination: To reduce stigma and discrimination related to HIV and AIDS

  • Treatment: To prolong and improve the quality of life of people infected with HIV and AIDS patients

  • Mitigation of the consequences of HIV/AIDS: To mitigate the consequences of HIV/AIDS at the level of the individual, the household, community, company as well as overall impact.

  • Research: Increase the level of scientific knowledge on HIV/AIDS, its consequences and best practices to fight against it

  • Coordination of the National response: To build capacity for planning and coordination, and decentralise the mechanisms for decision-making and resource management in order to scale up the national response.





UNDAF Outcome:

Individuals, civil society, national and local public and private institutions are empowered to halt the spread of HIV/AIDS among population at higher risks and to mitigate its impact.




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