Useful words



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Using Te Reo Māori

Useful words


This is a starting point for teachers. In some tribal areas these words may be slightly different so it may be appropriate to consult with your local iwi.

Tīmata

Ki runga

Ki raro

Ki mua

Ki muri

Ki roto

Ki waho

Ki waenganui

Haere ki te taha matau

Haere ki te taha mauī

Haere ki mua

Hoki ki muri/hoki atu

Haere tonu

Kia tere

Taihoa

Kia tau

Kia tūpato!

Neke atu

Neke mai

Huri ki te taha mauī/matau

Start

Up


Down

In front


Behind

In


Out

In the middle

Move to the right

Move to the left

Move forward

Move backward

Keep going

Be quick/Hurry up

Wait

Stop


Warning/watch out!

Move away

Move to me

Turn right around to the left /right



Āata haere

Hīkoi

Pekepeke

Hītoko

Oma

Pakipaki

Kanikani

Hurihuri

Tahi, rua, toru

Whana

Piu

Takahi

Tākere

Waiata–ā-ringa

Whakakori-ā-tinana

Mahi tākaro


Go/walk carefully

Walk


Jump

Hop


Run

Clap


Dance

Turn


One, two, three,

Kick


Skip

Stamp


Swing

Action song

Exercise to music

Games




Body parts


Body

Tinana

Head

Upoko

Nose

Ihu

Lips

Ngutu

Mouth

Waha

Teeth

Niho

Chin

Kauae

Throat

Korokoro

Neck

Kakī

Back

Tuarā

Chest

Uma/Poho

Stomach

Puku

Waist/hip

Hope

Backside

Nono/Whero/Tou


Arm/hand

Ringa

Elbow

Tuke

Finger

Matimati

Leg/foot

Waewae

Knee

Pona/Turi

Ankles

Rekereke

Toes

Matiwae

Numbers


Tahi 1

Rua 2


Toru 3

Whā 4


Rima 5

Ono 6


Whitu 7

Waru 8


Iwa 9

Tekau 10

Aerobics with Māori commands


Using music with a good beat, call out an action in Māori and demonstrate. Students could then repeat and do the action. Once students learn vocabulary and actions they could take turns at leading the exercise.

(Based on Te Reo Kori Volume 1, Ngarangi Naden, Kimihia Resources 1990.)


Action poi story

Read a story or poem to the class e.g. a Māori legend such as How Maui caught the Sun. On the second reading, select two pages for the students to improvise their own poi dance. Students could show their actions to others who could copy their patterns.

Rāpā– forming groups


Students move around a set area. Vary the way they move e.g. moon walking, side stepping. When a number is called in Māori students get into groups of that size.

Te Ngahere – the forest


Divide the class into groups of approximately four to five students. Each group chooses a name of a New Zealand native tree e.g. kauri, rimu, tōtara, nikau, kahikatea, mānuka, ngaio.

The class forms a circle with group members spread randomly throughout the circle. One person in the circle calls the name of a tree that the group have chosen. All group members in that named tree group must change places. The centre person tries to steal a place. Whoever misses out takes the centre and calls another group’s tree, all of whom must change places etc.

(Based on Te Reo Kori Volume 2, Ngarangi Naden, Kimihia Resources 1991.)

Kowhaiwhai patterns


Show students kowhaiwhai patterns and drawings. Discuss their significance and meaning. Look for common or distinct features in each drawing. Ask the students to suggest ways of moving that could emphasise the shapes and design.

Split students into groups of four to five. Give each group a copy of a kowhaiwhai pattern. Students look closely at the whole shape of the pattern, space, design, rhythm. Develop a movement pattern to reflect and emphasise the kowhaiwhai.

Try to think about:


(Based on Te Reo Kori Volume 2, Ngarangi Naden, Kimihia Resources 1991.)

Tips


Check out the Ngā Toi resources in Māori, at http://www.tki.org.nz/r/assessment/exemplars/maori/nga_toi/.





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