We are pleased to present to you the City of Melbourne’s annual report for 2012–13



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The Melbourne Conversations free public speaking series is a well-established program that adds to the flow of knowledge capital within the municipality. Discussions are led by expert guest speakers and topics include current and challenging issues which influence Melbourne's intellectual culture, creativity, liveability and sustainability. In 2012–13 the series covered a variety of topics such as:




  • Shaping Knowledge Cities in a digital world: What does this mean for you?

  • The Culture of the Book: Celebrating our City of Literature

  • Public Art: Models of Possibility

  • Constitutional Recognition of Australia's first peoples: Sell out or stepping stone?

  • What does the AIDS/HIV response mean for you?

  • Feeding a Growing Melbourne: Issues and Opportunities.

The popularity of Melbourne Conversations continues to increase with 5042 people attending conversations in 2012–13.



Strategic indicators


Name

Indicator

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

International students studying in the city as a proportion of total tertiary students

%

15

21

22

17

15


Local students studying in the city as a proportion of total tertiary students

%


85

80

79

83

85


Number of primary, secondary and tertiary educational establishments in the city

#




509

515

515

513


Ranking in the 2 Think Now Innovative Cities Index

#

10

20

19

17

18



Goal 5 – An eco-city
This ambitious goal inspires us to improve the sustainability of the city's building stock, reduce carbon emissions in all areas of city life, develop ways to capture, store and deliver water within the municipality and protect our world-renowned parks and gardens. Managing and improving resources and promoting recycling is an increasingly important part of reducing our ecological footprint.

We have an important role to play in working with our city to develop sustainable solutions and to plan and execute our preparedness for, and response to, a changing climate. We will work to ensure Melbourne is internationally recognised for our sustainability initiatives and as a leader in sustainable design.


Outcome 5.1 A reduced ecological footprint

A range of environmental strategies and programs have been developed to create a more sustainable, liveable and workable Melbourne. These initiatives aim to improve the municipality’s environmental performance, particularly by reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, reducing water consumption, and improving water quality and waste management.


In 2012–13 we commenced a review of two of our key sustainability strategies – Zero Net Emissions by 2020 and Total Watermark – City as a Catchment. We expect to release the finalised updates in mid 2013–14.

Zero net emissions
The City of Melbourne has set an ambitious target of zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2020.
The Zero Net Emissions strategy identifies areas where energy efficiency can be improved, or energy can be switched to low carbon, or renewable sources. While the City of Melbourne has comparatively little direct control over activities that create emissions within the municipality, the organisation can help influence behaviour through:


  • facilitating initiatives

  • activating partnerships with key stakeholders

  • advocating and educating

  • leading by example through actions within the municipality.



Innovative commercial solutions

The innovative 1200 Buildings Program aims to encourage and support building owners, managers and facility managers to improve the energy and water efficiency and reduce waste to landfill of commercial buildings in the municipality of Melbourne. Retrofitting benefits owners by future-proofing building assets against rising energy costs and attracting and retaining tenants and benefits the community by reducing the sector’s global greenhouse gas emissions.

One Environmental Upgrade Agreement was signed in the 2012–13 financial year for 470 Collins Street. The 15-storey office block is undertaking a $1 million retrofit project which includes a new cooling tower, boilers and building management system estimated to reduce energy consumption by around 30 per cent per year and greenhouse gas emissions by 310 tonnes per year.
The 1200 Buildings retrofit seminar series introduced building owners and managers to finance incentives on offer to support retrofit activity, including the City of Melbourne's Environmental Upgrade Finance. At the ‘Retrofit Your Lighting’ seminar series in May and June 2013, building owners and property professionals were keen to learn about incentives available for lighting retrofits, as well as best practice lighting design and technology, the economics of efficient lighting, and financial lighting retrofits using the City of Melbourne’s Environmental Upgrade Finance.
The launch of a new e-book on Environmental Upgrade Agreements signalled the property sectors support for this world-leading mechanism, developed in Melbourne.
The CitySwitch program, led in Victoria by the City of Melbourne, reported carbon savings in commercial buildings of over 14,000 tonnes in 2012–13, equal to removing 3,500 cars from the road. The City of Melbourne was also instrumental in securing Australian Government funding for the next two years to resource CitySwitch across the country.

The CitySwitch Awards celebrated the achievements of the City of Melbourne’s flagship program for office tenants. Award recipients included the Public Transport Ombudsman and Wise Consultants for their outstanding efforts to improve the environmental performance of their offices. The event was attended by 130 CitySwitch participants and supporters.

City of Melbourne is also a founding partner of the Melbourne CleanTech Network, a branch of Australian CleanTech. The network provides a regular forum for investors, companies, government and academia to meet, learn about the CleanTech sector and collaborate. As part of the Australian CleanTech Network it also provides national and international linkages. The City of Melbourne sponsored an exhibitor space at the Future Build exhibition in October 2012. The event strongly promoted the City of Melbourne’s commitment to sustainability in the built environment, aligning with the 1200 Buildings Program and demonstrating the great work being done to develop the sustainability sector.


Efficient water usage
The City of Melbourne’s goal to become a water sensitive city is outlined in the Total Watermark – City as a Catchment strategy. A water sensitive city aims to protect waterways, respond to climate change and sustainably manage the total water cycle. Understanding and addressing how water flows through our municipality as well as the resulting pollutants is essential to the ‘city as a catchment’ approach.
Total Watermark – City as a Catchment adopts a sustainable water management hierarchy incorporating water supply within the local catchment and beyond where possible. Within the municipality the sustainable water management hierarchy aims to:


  • reduce the demand on water

  • consider rainwater harvesting

  • consider stormwater harvesting

  • consider recycling water.

The resilience of the municipality’s urban landscapes was increased with the addition of new water storage capacity to reduce our reliance on potable (drinking) water. An additional 15 per cent of the landscape’s water requirements will be met with the delivery of stormwater harvesting facilities co funded by the Australian Government. Construction of the Fitzroy Gardens stormwater harvesting facility was completed, while the construction of the Birrarung Marr, Queen Victoria and Alexandra Gardens stormwater harvesting schemes were nearing completion at the end of the financial year. These landmark projects are integrated into heritage landscapes and significant event spaces. They will increase the resilience of the municipality’s urban landscapes, adapting them for future climate change and reducing reliance on potable water.

The heritage listed Hochgurtel Fountain on the south side of the Royal Exhibition Building in Carlton Gardens was refurbished and adapted for stormwater in April 2013. A new hydraulic system allows the fountain to operate on either potable or recycled water, without the use of chlorine, which had a detrimental effect on the original black iron reinforcement used in the fountainhead. The fountain will now predominantly run on stormwater harvested from the roof of the Royal Exhibition Building thanks to a joint arrangement between the City of Melbourne and Museum Victoria.
The replacement of failing trees and construction of a grassed and treed median strip in Gipps Street East Melbourne was completed in May 2013. The works have increased the number of Scarlet Oak trees to improve canopy cover and overall amenity. An existing issue of waterlogging, which had led to tree-failure in the past, was resolved with the installation of infrastructure to capture this water and redirect it to the median to maintain adequate soil moisture levels for the new trees.
New change room facilities at the North Melbourne Recreation Centre are now powered by a 3.5kw solar photovoltaics system and all toilets are flushed using backwash water from the pool. The fit out was completed with products that omit low volatile organic compounds, which use less embodied energy to produce.

Sustainable communities

The City of Melbourne has an overarching vision to improve our food system, reduce waste and increase recycling.

The City of Melbourne works with community members, businesses, universities and NGOs to determine sustainable food priorities for Melbourne. Sustainable food, community gardens and tree planting were all discussed with residents and surveys undertaken to assess engagement and knowledge. An EcoCity Food Forum held in March attracted 150 participants and explored ideas around a sustainable, resilient and fair food future. The forum brought together members of the community, academics and professionals from across the food sector.

A sustainable food information guide was developed in 2012–13 called: We need to talk about food – how we can all build a better food system. The guide helps residents, business and visitors better understand the impact food choices can have on the environment and provides information on where more sustainable options can be found.
The Start the Switch youth event and program for local schools was launched at the Town Hall in May 2013 with help from the Australian Youth Climate Coalition. Participants worked to promote awareness of sustainability within the municipality. Start the Switch is a City of Melbourne initiative developed in partnership with the Australian Youth Climate Coalition and aimed at empowering secondary students to take a leadership role in addressing climate change and developing sustainable solutions. After a successful pilot in 2012, Start the Switch is now being rolled-out nationally. Start the Switch was a finalist in the 2013 Prime Minister’s Environment Awards, in the sustainable education category.
The delivery of the Sustainable Living Festival, Eco Carlton program and Positive Charge provided residents and visitors with information and support to change behaviour in their homes and neighbourhoods.

Waste management practices are also central to the City of Melbourne’s goal to reduce the municipality’s ecological footprint. Our High Rise Recycling Project is helping apartment buildings to improve the amount and quality of recycling being collected. More than 70 per cent of residents in the municipality live in high rise apartment buildings where recycling facilities are not always optimal. Since June 2012 City of Melbourne officers have been working with the managers of apartment buildings throughout the municipality to make it easier and more convenient for residents to access their building’s recycling bins and increase the amount and quality of their recycling. At the beginning of April 2013, 101 buildings had confirmed their participation in the project, bringing the number of individual apartments involved to more than 20,500.

A food waste processing machine was trialled in the Melbourne Town Hall in 2012–13 to research the benefits for the local hotel industry. The Gaia food waste drier reduces the volume and weight of food waste by 90 per cent. The drier was used to process up to 100 kilograms of organic food waste at a time, including fruit, vegetables, grains, fish, lean meat and small bones produced by catering facilities at the town hall. There is no residual smell and the output from the machine can be used as a form of compost.

Outcome 5.2 Melbourne is better adapted to climate change
Climate change response
Climate change adaptation and mitigation is a central concern for the City of Melbourne.
To help meet this challenge the City of Melbourne launched the Inner Melbourne Climate Adaptation Network in August 2012. The network connects and facilitates communication between organisations involved in actively managing the risks associated with climate change impacts facing inner Melbourne and includes representatives from the Victorian Government, water authorities, industry, scientific organisations and emergency services. The network’s third meeting in August 2013 brought together drought and heat specialists to discuss expected climate impacts. The latest trends confirm that south east Australia, including Melbourne, will become hotter and drier with negative implications for water supplies and natural environments.

Urban landscapes and climate adaptation

Melbourne’s parks, gardens, green spaces and tree-lined streets are a defining part of the city and contribute enormously to its liveability. More than a decade of drought, severe water restrictions and periods of extreme heat, combined with an ageing tree stock, put the municipality’s trees under immense stress and many are now in a state of accelerated decline. Melbourne’s urban forest also faces two additional challenges: climate change, with its associated severe weather events, and urban growth.

The City of Melbourne’s Urban Forest Strategy seeks to manage these changes and protect against future vulnerability by providing a robust strategic framework for the evolution and longevity of Melbourne's urban forest. The strategy aims to:


  • adapt our city to climate change

  • mitigate the urban heat island effect by bringing our inner city temperatures down

  • create healthier ecosystems

  • become a water-sensitive city

  • engage and involving the community.

To help understand the impacts of climate change on Melbourne’s trees the City of Melbourne undertook dendrochronological analysis of 250 trees as part of a new project with the University of Melbourne. Dendrochronology scientists, who study the annual growth rings of trees, took core samples from the trees for analysis. Results indicate that Melbourne’s climate has shifted in recent decades and that there is a strong temporal relationship between irrigation and tree growth. This information will assist the city to adjust its irrigation program to improve tree health and longevity. This innovative research is the first of its kind for an Australian city.

An additional 3000 new trees were planted over the past year throughout our parks, gardens and streets to meet Urban Forest Strategy targets and move towards doubling the city’s canopy cover. Highlights of the planting program included the installation of nine mature Canary Island Date Palms (Phoenix canariensis) along the eastern boundary of Fawkner Park adjacent to Park Place. The 12 metre, eight tonne palms, which had been relocated and stored following the upgrade of Harbour Esplanade, were transported and replanted in a major operation in January 2013. This was the first planting of mature palms the City of Melbourne had undertaken in several years and marked the start of the annual planting program.

The Exceptional Tree Register was developed to protect and celebrate the city’s most significant and special trees which are growing on private property. The register was endorsed by Council and received interim protection from the Victorian Government through the Melbourne Planning Scheme. Additionally, a new Tree Retention and Removal Policy was developed to strengthen the city’s work protecting the urban forest. This policy responds to the incremental loss of the urban forest due to development and puts in place guidelines for tree protection.
The City of Melbourne continued to run the quarterly Canopy: Melbourne Green Roof Forum to supply and exchange information to promote uptake in the area. The forum brings together developers, engineers, designers, researchers and building owners to network and learn about green urban infrastructure.
An innovative new local open space in Errol Street, North Melbourne, was launched in February 2013. The project repurposed the existing road space to increase the size of the existing reserve from 500 m2 to 5000 m2. The new park now has increased amenity for the local community and has also reduced the impacts of the urban heat island effect and increased environmental service provision in the area.

The installation of new permeable bluestone paving in Collins Street between Elizabeth and Queen streets will help street trees cool the city. When rain falls on the innovative permeable paving it passes through the footpath and waters the tree roots below. The permeable pavers improve the growing environment for the trees, while having an overall cooling effect on the urban environment. If the new pavement works well it could become a standard treatment for footpaths throughout the central city.

The City of Melbourne developed the Growing Green Guide for Melbourne in partnership with the Inner Melbourne Action Plan councils, the University of Melbourne and the Department of Environment and Primary Industries, to encourage residents, developers and businesses to create green rooves, walls and facades.


A leader in sustainability
The City of Melbourne is committed to leading by example in the area sustainability.

The organisation was formally certified as carbon neutral under the National Carbon Offset Standard administered by Low Carbon Australia in March 2013. The certification means Melbourne is one of just four councils in Australia to achieve this status.


The City of Melbourne’s operations produced 51,996 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions
(t CO2-e) during the 2011–12 financial year. By offsetting, we have achieved an emissions reduction equivalent to taking over 13,000 cars off the road for one year, or equivalent to planting over 180,000 trees.1
The City of Melbourne’s 2020 emission reduction target for corporate travel was achieved eight years ahead of schedule. Emissions were reduced by 70 per cent from baseline levels. Over the past six years emissions were cut from 635 t CO2-e to 331 t CO2-e per year. The inclusion of electric vehicles in the fleet is instrumental in this reduction and will drive future emission reductions at the City of Melbourne.

Technology exists to create a district energy system among neighbouring buildings. The City of Melbourne investigated the viability of linking the Melbourne Town Hall and surrounding buildings in a sustainable energy precinct. A study was undertaken to determine whether heating, cooling and electrical energy could be shared between buildings surrounding the town hall. The study determined there was suitable energy demand and sufficient interest and expertise in the energy sector to deliver the solutions.

A Sustainable Transport Expo was staged for staff at the car park of Council House 2 in September 2012. Approximately 200 staff members attended the expo to celebrating sustainable ways to get to work and active living. The expo also launched the new 2012–13 Enterprise Agreement Sustainable Transport targets. The inaugural cycle fashion parade demonstrated how committed and fashionable staff cyclists were.
Community education
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions can only be achieved through increased awareness of environmental issues. Increased community education is one way to help reduce the municipality’s ecological footprint.
An innovative new program, Smart Blocks, was launched in Melbourne in June 2013. The national program was developed using the research and engagement undertaken through City of Melbourne’s Hi-RES project, in partnership with Strata Community Australia, the City of Sydney, Owners Corporation Network of Australia and Green Strata. The Smart Blocks program is designed to help apartment owners and their managers save money by improving energy efficiency. It includes an interactive online toolkit that helps people identify efficiency improvements for common property in their buildings and walks them through the steps to get those improvements approved by the owners’ corporations.
Strategic indicators


Name

Indicator

Target

2009–10

2010–11


2011–12

2012–13

City of Melbourne performance on refuse recycling initiatives and effective and efficient water usage

%

70

67

68



No longer asked

How has the City Of Melbourne performed on Environmental Sustainability over the last 12 months?

#










62

62

CO2 emissions per resident per year

Tonnes

15

7.8

5.22

Data measured every 3 years

Data measured every 3 years


CO2 emissions per worker per year (across the municipality)

Tonnes

10

9.9


4.70

Data measured every 3 years

Data measured every 3 years


Tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions for the municipality per year

Tonnes

6.4
million

4.08 million

3.80

million


Data measured every 3 years

Data measured every 3 years


Percentage of municipal waste diverted for recycling

%

25

25

26

25

24


Reduction of residential waste to landfill per household

%

-1

-3

12

-4

-6

Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from City of Melbourne operations


%

34

34

27

33

*

Reduction of waste to landfill from City of Melbourne facilities (offices)

%

-33

-46

Data measured every 3 years

Data measured every 3 years

Data measured every 3 years

Number of commercial buildings retrofitted under the 1200 program

#

50

37

44

46

180

Reduction of drinking quality water consumed for council building and gardens

%

20

60


73


54


29

In response to feedback from local councils, Local Government Victoria introduced methodological and content changes to the Community Satisfaction Survey in 2011–12. Methodological improvements to the Community Satisfaction Survey in 2011–12 and 2012–13 included increasing the sample size from the previous minimum of 350 respondents per municipality up to 400 respondents so the sample better reflects the demographic composition of a municipality. The survey also allows for respondents to be ‘residents over 18 years of age’ instead of restricting respondents to ‘head of household’. For these reasons, direct comparison with previous Community Satisfaction Survey results is not possible.

In both forms of the survey, the response to each of the standard 'scale' questions above is assigned a value. These values are then averaged across all respondents to create an 'index score'. However, the values assigned changed in 2012:


2010–11 response scale and values

100 – Excellent: outstanding performance


80 – Good: a high standard
60 – Adequate: an acceptable standard
40 – Needs some improvement
20 – Needs a lot of improvement
Excluded – Don’t know / can’t say
2011–12 and later response scale and values

100 – Very good

75 – Good

50 – Average

25 – Poor

0 – Very poor



Excluded – Can't say

*The greenhouse gas emissions from City of Melbourne operations are now calculated using a different methodology. The 2011–12 data cannot be directly compared.


City of Melbourne sustainability indicators
The City of Melbourne consumes energy in the daily operation of its administration and buildings, community buildings such as childcare centres, public lighting and the corporate fleet. We monitor the consumption of three major energy types: electricity, natural gas and fuel.

To achieve carbon neutral accreditation in 2013, an externally-verified greenhouse gas emissions inventory was developed. This inventory calculated the energy usage of Council’s operations, including data from sources not previously counted, such as the energy used by our contractors and suppliers. The figures for 2011–12 are significantly different from previous years due to this change in methodology.

Due to issues around the timing of the Annual Report and Council’s reporting obligations under the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Act 2007 (Cth), the last Annual Report included some estimated data for the year 2011–12. This data was adjusted to reflect the correct figures. The 2012–13 data is not provided in this report as it is not available at the time of writing.
As 2011–12 is the year City of Melbourne received Carbon Neutral accreditation, this is now reported as the base year. The data from the Corporate Inventory for 2010–11 used the same accounting methodology and is included for reference.

City of Melbourne’s energy use by source


Energy use by source

2010–11**

New base year

2011–12**

Electricity (Vic grid)*

54,533

51,321

Natural gas

16,163

21,706

Unleaded petrol

3,996

3,401

LPG fuel


354

4

Diesel

889

1,353

Ethanol

0

0

Total energy use (GJ)

75,935

77,785

Electricity - GreenPower

33,061

35,286

% renewable

44%

45%

* Only includes electricity directly under City of Melbourne control. Does not include QVM or Citywide or CitiPower street lighting.

** Based on NCOS data

2012–13 data is not available at the time of writing.


City of Melbourne’s energy use by activity


Energy use by source

2010–11**

New base year

2011–12**

Administration facilities


26,681

30,293

Child care facilities

831

930

Community facilities

2,181

2,825

Cultural facilities

3,096

2,976

Information facilities

2,643

1,922

Leased facilities

8,061

9,514

Library facilities

1,784

1,106

Park facilities

1,476

1,823

Melbourne parking meter network

946


901

Recreation facilities

117

183

Melbourne security camera network

1,222

887

Sports facilities

11,640

11,673

Melbourne street lighting network

12,984

13,196

Total energy use (GJ)

73,662*

78,229*

** Based on NGERS data, includes some estimates

2012–13 data is not available at the time of writing.



Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions


Total emissions

2010–11

Base year

2011–12


Emissions (t CO2-e)

51,502

51,996

Percentage from previous year

-

+ 1%

2012–13 data is not available at the time of writing.

City of Melbourne (CoM) total water use


Total CoM water use

Base year 1999–2000*

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12**

201213***

Potable (Ml)

1,544

520

607

623


390

655

1,192

Reclaimed (Ml)

0

87

73

90

65

90

87

Total water

1,544

607

680

713

455

745

1,280

Percentage from base year




-60.7%

-56%

-53.8%

-70.5%

-57.6%

-22.8%


Percentage from previous year




-19.2%

12%

17.4%

-36.2%

67.95%

81.9%

Percentage reclaimed




14.3%

10.7%

12.7%

14.3%

12.1%

6.8%

Notes

* In 1999–2000 a baseline was established which became our base year.

** Figures previously published for this year were estimates and adjustments were made to reflect actual results available at the time of printing.

*** Due to billing cycles these figures include estimated calculations based on current and seasonal trends.


City of Melbourne (CoM) water use by activity


Total CoM water use

Base year

1999–2000*


2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12**

2012–13***

Administration - buildings

11

4

4

9

15

11

18

Commercial - buildings

1

2

6

4

4

3

3

Community use - buildings

70

45

41

47

43

99

86

Community use – open space

1,462


557

629

654

393

632

1,173

Total water (ML)

1,544

607

680

714

455

745

1,280

Notes

* In 1999–2000 a baseline was established which became our base year.

** Figures previously published for this year were estimates and adjustments were made to reflect actual results available at the time of printing.

*** Due to billing cycles these figures include estimated calculations based on current and seasonal trends.


Goal 6 – A connected city

In a connected city, people can move about freely to communicate and trade – locally, regionally and globally – without sacrificing essential social or ecological values. The City of Melbourne will focus on advocating for safe, efficient and sustainable movement throughout the city and make sure Melbourne is accessible at local, regional and international levels.


Outcome 6.1 Movement of people and food within the municipality is efficient, integrated and safe, with more people choosing sustainable forms of transport



Promoting walking and cycling
A safe and inviting environment plays a central role in encouraging more people to walk and cycle in the municipality.

The focus of the first year of the Bicycle Plan 2012–16 was to strengthen connections and improve safety for people of all ages and cycling abilities. The La Trobe Street physically separated bike lanes allow cautious cyclists to travel from east to west and to access the city. Exhibition Street peak-period bike lanes connect to the popular Rathdowne Street lanes and a new lane on Princes Bridge connects cyclists to bicycle-friendly Swanston Street from the Yarra Trail and St Kilda Road.

New painted separated bike lanes in each direction on Clarendon Street, East Melbourne, were put into operation, increasing safety for cyclists in the area. The new lanes connect the Albert Street bike route and off-road paths around the MCG and the Yarra Trail. The lanes provide cyclists with a safer distance from moving and parked cars. This was measured to be very effective in encouraging cyclists to ride outside the car-dooring zone.

Elizabeth Street between La Trobe and Little Lonsdale streets received an upgrade with new bluestone paving, trees, street furniture, bicycle parking hoops and more accessible connections, making it easier for people to walk around the city. New bluestone footpaths in Collins Street between Queen and Elizabeth streets were also upgraded as part of the Streetscapes project in consultation with property owners and businesses in the area. All footpaths were upgraded to ensure they conform to Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) requirements and were de-cluttered to improve pedestrian amenity. New trees were added for shade and new permeable pavement trialled to help the trees survive periods of drought.

The shared pathway between the Royal Park Station and The Avenue was upgraded with 20 separate-solar powered LED lights to light the way for pedestrians and cyclists crossing Royal Park. The lights have a motion detector to sense movement and power up to full illumination when the path is being used and dim down if there is no movement. This helps preserve battery power and keeps the area dim for nocturnal animals. The battery powered lights did not require electrical connections so disturbance to the sensitive parklands was minimised.

October 2012 was a busy month for cycling in the city, with the annual Ride to Work Day event at Federation Square. Cyclists were treated to breakfast and an expo which included a City of Melbourne stall showcasing the services on offer for cyclists. October also saw the Around the Bay in a Day event which attracted a record 17,000 riders from across Australia and overseas. Participants rode around Melbourne’s picturesque Port Phillip Bay, finishing at Alexandra Gardens.


Safe streets and footpaths
Making Melbourne safe for uses of public, private and active transport is central concern to becoming a more connect city.
The finishing touches were put on Swanston Street after the three-year redevelopment which began in 2010 and included four new universally accessible tram stops and new bike lanes. Street furniture, landscaping and lighting were among the last elements to be completed finishing off the $25.6 million project in the second half of 2012.
During November 2012 city residents, workers and visitors were welcomed to a Talk Shop in Swanston Street to chat about road safety issues. Using an empty street-trading cylinder as a base, Talk Shop engaged pedestrians to share their thoughts and ideas about road safety to feed into a draft Road Safety Plan. A total of 220 submissions were received through the Talk Shop, stakeholder workshops and an online survey. The City of Melbourne’s Future Melbourne Committee endorsed the new Road Safety Plan 2013–17 at its meeting held on 2 July 2013.
The City of Melbourne has continued to develop road safety initiatives that deliver positive road safety messages around complying with the road rules through safe road interaction and demonstrating preferred behaviours. Projects in 2012–13 include:


  • Move Mindfully Melbourne, a social marketing campaign which included a series of short clips launched during BikeFest and screened during the 2013 Melbourne International Comedy Festival.

  • Move Mindfully bicycle tours for international students unfamiliar with local road rules.
  • DirtGirl World Wheelie Workshops educating children and their families on bicycle safety.

The City of Melbourne partnered with the Amy Gillett Foundation and other key stakeholders to develop the Sharing the roads and paths booklet. The booklet provides information about rules and safe behaviours when sharing roads and paths with bicycle riders. Through our membership on Road Safety Action Group Inner Melbourne, a research project was also commissioned to understand more about ‘car-dooring’, or when a cyclist collides with a car door, which is the most common crash type leading to hospitalisation for cyclists in inner Melbourne. The recommendations from the research project will inform future initiatives designed to improve the safety of cyclists.


The City of Melbourne’s pedestrian monitoring data for December 2012 showed the impact the new format of New Year’s Eve celebrations had on pedestrian activity in the city. The results suggested the new format for New Year’s Eve worked well in spreading the crowds throughout the city, compared with previous years. It particularly reduced the number of revellers around the Princes Bridge sensor, north-west corner of Flinders Street Station and Princes Bridge, while other sensors along thoroughfares to other event location recorded a marked increase in pedestrian activity.

Outcome 6.2 Melbourne is connected and accessible regionally, nationally and globally
Connected and accessible

The City of Melbourne works hard to ensure the municipality is accessible for commuters, freight and delivery vehicles.

Around 800,000 people move through the city every day, a figure which is expected to increase to more than one million by 2030. The City of Melbourne’s Transport Strategy acknowledges and plans for this expected growth. Ensuring the city has adequate regional and global transport connections as well as suitable port freight and logistics helps the city’s economy to flourish.

The City of Melbourne is also keen to showcase the benefits the newly renamed Melbourne City Marina (formerly Waterfront City Marina) could have for tourism and local traders. The name change coincided with the start of the boating season and reflected changes to the marina which have made it the largest visitor berthing facility within Melbourne, providing casual short-term stay to the recreational boating community. To help promote the upgraded marina the City of Melbourne took part in the 25th annual Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show in May 2013. With 327 exhibitors and 127 boats on the water the event reported a total of 37,571 visitors.

Outcome 6.3 Use of parking space is maximised
Parking maximisation
Balancing the parking needs of the community and businesses within the municipality is a central concern for the City of Melbourne. The parking rules exist to improve traffic flow and provide safe, efficient and equitable access for all motorists.
New parking technology introduced across the municipality in 2011 performed well over the financial year. In-ground sensors that detect and record when a vehicle arrives and departs from a parking bay have increased compliance resulting in a steady turnover of parking spaces.
The pay-by-phone trial in Carlton was extended into 2013 and is offered as an alternative method of payment. The take-up of pay-by-phone parking has steadily gathered pace as drivers become familiar with the new system. Council is in the process of evaluating the trial with a view to expanding it across the municipality.

A community education campaign was rolled out across the municipality in November 2012 to raise awareness about parking rules, regulations and timeframes. The campaign included signage on parking sign poles, stickers on parking meters and ticket machines, posters, print and radio advertisements. The campaign has contributed to an increase in voluntary compliance with parking restrictions by motorists.

The City of Melbourne also coordinated and co-hosted the fifth annual Victorian Council Compliance Services Workshop. The event focuses on parking-related issues and attracted delegates from over 30 Victorian councils, as well as the City of Hobart, the Port of Melbourne Corporation and Melbourne Airport. Topics covered included service excellence, conflict management, court preparation and presentation. Feedback from internal and external delegates was positive.
Strategic indicators


Name

Indicator

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

Community satisfaction rating for overall performance of local roads and footpaths

#

68

68

65



No longer asked

City of Melbourne performance on promoting use of public transport

%


65

73

80



No longer asked

City of Melbourne performance on quality and coverage of bike and footpaths and convenience of walking around the central city

#

70

69

70



No longer asked

Community satisfaction rating for overall performance of traffic management and parking facilities

#

55

55

53



No longer asked

Mode share for public transport, motor bikes, walking and cycling of Victorian city users

%

43

48

48

66

Data now collected as part of national Census



In response to feedback from local councils, Local Government Victoria introduced methodological and content changes to the Community Satisfaction Survey in 2011–12. Methodological improvements to the Community Satisfaction Survey in 2011–12 and 2012–13 included increasing the sample size from the previous minimum of 350 respondents per municipality up to 400 respondents so the sample better reflects the demographic composition of a municipality. The survey also allows for respondents to be ‘residents over 18 years of age’ instead of restricting respondents to ‘head of household’. For these reasons, direct comparison with previous Community Satisfaction Survey results is not possible.

In both forms of the survey, the response to each of the standard 'scale' questions above is assigned a value. These values are then averaged across all respondents to create an 'index score'. However, the values assigned changed in 2012:


2010–11 response scale and values

100 – Excellent: outstanding performance


80 – Good: a high standard
60 – Adequate: an acceptable standard
40 – Needs some improvement
20 – Needs a lot of improvement
Excluded – Don’t know / can’t say
2011–12 and later response scale and values

100 – Very good

75 – Good

50 – Average

25 – Poor

0 – Very poor

Excluded – Can't say

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