Western Daily Press

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Although not so much before the public in recent years, Mr Fry gave active and valued support to various schemes and institutions.

Mr Lewis Fry, after his retirement from Parliament, withdrew entirely from public life, and was only seen occasionally in local and other social functions. For some time he was seen driving about, but latterly has been confined to the house. The funeral service on Tuesday at the Cathedral, at 2.30 p.m. will be a public service, and no personal invitations will be issued.

07/08/1917

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Dr W. J. H. Pinniger

Dr W. J. H. Pinniger died on Saturday at Widcombe Villa, Richmond Hill, Clifton, after a long illness. He was the son of the late Thomas Large Pinniger of Beckhampton, Wilts, and Mrs Pinniger of Clifton. He was educated at Colchester House, Clifton, and Clifton College, and received his professional education at University College, Bristol, King's College and University College, London. He qualified with the diploma of M.R.C.S. (Eng), L.R.C.P. (London) in July 1905, and took his M.B., B.S. of the University of London, the same year, and his M.D., London, in 1907. As a student he gained many honours, and at the end of his course was awarded the Committee Gold Medal as the most distinguished man of his year. Through practically the whole of his medical career, he was connected with the Bristol General Hospital, having held in succession all the resident posts, including that of Senior House Surgeon during an interregnum, and afterwards as Curator of the Museum and Surgical Registrar. He was also House Surgeon at the Jessop Hospital for Women at Sheffield.

Dr Pinniger was at one time on the staff of the Bristol Dispensary but resigned on his appointment as medical officer to Mullers Orphanages, which post he held at the onset of his illness. He was also medical officer to the Bristol Lying in Hospital and Temporary Home. Of a retiring disposition, he took no part in public affairs, but was an enthusiastic Churchman and a keen politician. He married the twin daughter of the late Rev. W. Blake Atkinson, of Weston-super-Mare, and leaves a daughter and two sons.

02/10/1917

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Mr George Bright

We regret to announce the death, at his residence, Victoria Square, Clifton, of Mr George Bright, an ex-Sheriff of the city, and formerly associated for many years with the Old Bank at Bristol. Mr George Bright was the fourth son of the late Mr Robert Bright, of Abbot's Leigh, who was so prominently identified with the free port movement, for his services in connection with which he was presented with a service of gold plate, which now forms part of the treasures at the Art Gallery. Born in May 1826, at Abbot's Leigh, he was educated at Winchester College, and afterwards at Haileybury, whence he passed out second with high honours and distinction in English composition and classics, and entered the Bengal Civil Service in 1847. After serving 26 years he retired as Judge of the District of Hooghly in 1872. Soon after his return to England, he became manager at Stuckey's Bank at Wells, Somerset, and in 1875 he became a partner in the Old Bank at Bristol, where he remained for several years. Mr Bright served the office of Sheriff of Bristol in 1875. He was twice married, first to Eleanor Georgina, daughter of the late Mr Thomas McCausland, of Drenagh, Limayady, Ireland, by whom he had one son, who died. His second wife was the oldest daughter of the late Henry T. Raikes, Judge of the High Court of Calcutta. There were three sons and four daughters, the youngest son having been killed in action at Paarsdeburg in the Boer War in 1900. One of the daughters is the wife of Mr Charles Budgett.

05/10/1917

Western Daily Press

Will


Mr George Webster
Mr George Webster, of Hazlewood, Keynsham, and of Albert Road, St Philip's, Bristol, hide, skin, and fat commission agent, who died on the 5th August last, has left estate valued at £20,952 18s 9d.

13/10/1917

Western Daily Press

Will


Mr William Edward Robertson
Mr William Edward Robertson of Frenchay Lodge, Frenchay, Bristol, railway contractor, whose death occurred on April 6th last, left estate valued at £19,418 14s.

20/10/1917

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Joseph Byerley
A well-known citizen has passed away by the death of Mr Joseph Byerley, which took place on Thursday morning, at 34, Egerton Road, Bishopston, in his 81st year. Deceased, who was a commercial traveller, was one of Bristol's first Volunteers, and was well known, not only in Bristol, but throughout the surrounding country, as a very keen angler. He had a fund of anecdote, and was a most entertaining companion. His death will be mourned by a very large circle of friends.

03/11/1917

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr William Dove Willcox
A Leading Bristol Tariff Reformer

We regret to announce that the death of Mr W. Dove Willcox occurred yesterday at his residence, Brocksholme, Redland Green.

Mr William Dove Willcox was a Lancastrian, having been born at Chorley, on the 16th August, 1845, and was, therefore, in his 73rd year. The son of the Rev. P. M. Willcox, he was related on his mother's side to a well-known Lancashire family, which for centuries owned the Bowland estate in the Northern county. After being privately educated, mainly by the Rev. J. S. Boucher, Mr Dove Willcox, coming to Bristol as a youth, entered the leather trade, and became a partner in the well-known firm of Dove and Willcox, leather factors, Victoria Street. With this business he was associated for the whole of his commercial career, helping to make it one of the leading houses in this part of the country. In 1908 following the death of his only son at an early age, he relinquished control of Dove and Willcox, but he did not retire altogether into private life; some connection with and influence in the leather trade being retained by him as a director of Messrs Parker Bros. Ltd., tanners, Bedminster.

For a long period of years Mr Dove Willcox was a well-known figure in local trade and commerce, and gained the respect of all with whom he came into contact. As an active member of the Bristol Chamber of Commerce and Shipping - of which he was President in 1889-90 and 1890-91 - he did much to promote the interests of the city and port, and his services in carrying through various useful schemes were much appreciated alike by employers and employed. Appointed to the Magisterial Bench in 1894, he discharged his duties as justice of the peace with marked ability and dignity whilst his reputation for fair dealing and impartiality led to his being chosen for the responsible position of umpire to the Bristol Boot and Shoe Trade Arbitration Board, in which post he delivered many important decisions, which prevented trouble and promoted the interests of the trade.

During a large portion of his life, Mr Dove Willcox was actively associated with the Liberal Party and a supporter of local organizations with the Redcliff Ward Liberal Association in the days when the ward was a stronghold of Conservatism. In later years he became an ardent advocate of Tariff Reform, mainly through the columns of the 'Daily Press' and in doing so he occupied a fairly large share of public attention. He and the late Mr G. E. Spear were two of the most thoughtful and argumentative of Tariff Reformers in the Bristol district. Mr Dove Willcox being much obsessed with this subject, was disappointed to find that old Liberal friends, who agreed with him in regard to practically everything else, were not convinced by the arguments which he frequently expressed in conversation as well as in public print. In religion Mr Dove Willcox was a Wesleyan of the old-fashioned type, and when a young man he had a strong inclination to enter the ministry. Practically all his life he was associated with Portland Chapel, Kingsdown, of which he was one of the chief supporters. Members of his family have taken a very active part in social and mission work in Bristol.

social and mission work in Bristol.

15/11/1917

Western Daily Press

Will


Mr William Henry Mason
Mr William Henry Mason, of 12, Victoria Street, Clifton, Bristol, watchmaker, whose death occurred on the 19th May last, left estate of the gross value of £5,212 18s 8d.

06/09/1917

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr James Owens
Many Bristolians will regret to hear of the death of Mr James Owens, which took place at his residence, Lynwood, Brislington, on Tuesday. Mr Owens, who had reached the age of 72, was a native of Bristol and was educated at the Old Bristol Trades School. Upon leaving school he entered his father's business in Victoria Street as a grocer and provision merchant, and upon the latter's retirement in 1868 he took over the sole control, continuing until 1899, when he relinquished it and devoted himself to public work. In 1897 he joined the Old Incorporation of the Poor, and one year later, upon the establishment of the Bristol Board of Guardians, he was returned as one of its first members for the Redcliff Ward. Mr Owen's abilities as a practical administrator were soon recognised, and in 1900 he was elected chairman of the Provisions Committee, including Assessment and Finance, and has taken a great interest in the annual treats for the aged inmates and the children in the Scattered Homes. At the Brislington Parish Council election of 1906, Mr Owens was one of the successful candidates. For twenty years he has taken an active part as a sidesman in the religious life of Temple Church and was elected warden at the last Easter vestry meeting. He leaves a widow, two sons, and three daughters. The younger son was one of the first to join "Bristol's Own" and is now serving on the tanks in France.

24/01/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Private Harold A. Rich

His Life For His Country

An Officer's Tribute
Private Harold A. Rich of the 12th Gloucesters (Bristol's Own), who fell in action in France on January 8th, was the youngest son of the last Mr J. Rich, of 4, Belmont Road, Brislington. Prior to enlisting he had from boyhood been in the employ of Messrs Stotesbury, engineers' outfitters, Victoria Street, and he was highly respected by every member of the firm's staff.

In acquainting his mother of the sad event his officer wrote:- "He died almost instantaneously as a result of the bursting of a bomb, probably thrown from a German catapult."

25/01/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Lieut-Commander Edgar Christopher Cookson, D.S.O., R.N.

The late Lieut-Commander Edgar Christopher Cookson, D.S.O., R.N.

who as announced on Saturday, has been awarded the Victoria Cross in recognition of gallant action on September 28th, 1915, during the advance on Kut-el-Amara, was the younger son of the late Captain W. E. Cookson, R.N. and of Mrs Cookson, of 15, Royal Park, Clifton. The deceased officer was 31 years of age, and was educated at Hazelhurst, and entered the Britannia in September 1897. He served as a midshipman on board H.M.S. Dido, on the China station, and took part in the Boxer Rebellion.

During the present war he took part in the defence of the Suez Canal, and was afterwards attached to the Expeditionary Force operating from the Persian Gulf. He was awarded the D.S.O. in the Shatt-el-Arab, the official record being as follows:-

"Lieut-Commander Cookson was conducting a reconnaissance up a creek of the Euphrates in the armed launch Shusam on May 9th, 1915, when he was heavily attacked by Arabs concealed in the reeds. Although severely wounded early in the action, he resumed command after his wound had been temporarily dressed, and succeeded in most ably extricating the vessel from a perilous position under heavy rifle fire."

09/02/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Rev. Henry Nicholson Ellacombe


The death occurred on Monday afternoon of the Rev. Henry Nicholson Ellacombe, hon. Canon and Vicar of Bitton. Since March last year, Canon Ellacombe has been in poor health, and only rarely since then has he been allowed to officiate at the Bitton church. Early this year his health became a matter of anxiety to his friends, and early in January it was announced in the 'Western Daily Press' that his condition was becoming critical. His great age militated against him wrestling successfully against a long illness, for he had reached his 94th year. He not only was amongst the oldest of the West country clergy, but also in the long period in holding the same benefice, for he was 65 years vicar of Bitton.

His work as a churchman was recognised by his being made a Rural Dean of Bitton in 1874, and a Bristol honorary Canon in 1881. The late Canon and his father - who was also a Canon - have ministered at Bitton for the major part of a century, and both father and son were literary men, although their published works were marked by different schools of thought. The late Canon's father was the author of the two large folio volumes of Kingswood Manuscripts, a copy of which has been preserved in the Bristol Central Library, in which he deals with numerous manorial, social and industrial matters concerning Bitton and its environs, including the Kingswood forest. Leading works of his son, the subject of this obituary notice, dealt with floriculture, in which he took delight, and on which he wrote with the pen of an enthusiast. Nothing delighted the late Canon more in his leisure hours than to take some expert gardener over his beautiful Bitton garden and discuss some interesting point of botany. Such visitors came from Kew and other leading botanical gardens in the country, as well as from the continent, and the result of his research was set forth in various interesting works, the best known of which are probably, "A Gloucestershire Garden", "Garden Craft in Shakespeare", and "My Vicarage Garden and Elsewhere". It is not surprising, therefore, that the village gardeners of Bitton regarded the Canon's words on gardening as an oracle concerning which there was no gainsay.

In the early Victorian period he took his degree of M.A. following his college life at Oxford. He was a deacon and priest in the Lichfield diocese in 1847, and came to Bitton as vicar in 1850. In many respects he was a typical country vicar, for he always preferred the surroundings of gardens and green fields to those of bricks and mortar. He retained characteristics of the Victorian age, and was noted for his fixity of purpose when he had decided that a course to be pursued was the right one, and on occasion he exhibited a dry tone of humour in his conversation. The older residents will miss a paternal minister and a good friend, and his death removes a leading landmark in the Bitton parish.

The deceased's family are a son, Dr G. Ellacombe, and several daughters, one of whom is the wife of the Rev. Herbert Cookey, whose benefice adjoins that of Bitton, viz St Anne's, Oldland, and another the wife of Captain Campbell. There are also two other daughters. Mrs Ellacombe pre-deceased the Canon some years ago. The funeral takes place at Bitton tomorrow.

02/03/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Mr Edwin George Tyrrell

We regret to announce the death of Mr Edwin George Tyrrell, which took place yesterday, at his residence, The Polygon, Clifton. The deceased gentlemen, who had a very wide circle of friends in Bristol, was the Inspector of Evening Classes under the Bristol Educational Committee, and was well-known in connection with various educational agencies in the city. Mr Tyrrell was in his 74th year. Amongst the posts he had occupied in a long and active career were those of headmaster of Clifton National Boys' School, headmaster of Cheltenham College Practising School, late examiner of pupils at the Asylum for the Blind, tutor at the late Dr Stephenson Jellie's Military Establishment, and had been connected with the Grammar School and Bristol Cathedral School. For many years he was a voluntary organiser of the Fresh Air Fund for Bristol, and for 21 years he was actively connected with the Children's Help Society. A keen worker in all temperance movements in the city of Bristol, he was also greatly interested in the Workers' Educational Association. He was a familiar figure in the city.

22/03/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Henry Wethered

We regret to announce the death of Mr Henry Wethered, an esteemed citizen, who expired at his residence, Woodland Road, Tyndall's Park, yesterday morning at a quarter to ten o'clock, in his 88th year. His son and daughter were present at the time of his decease.

Mr Wethered was born at Little Marlow, came to Bristol sixty-two years ago, and he has resided here since. He never desired a public life, preferring the contentment of his own surroundings, and at the same time striving to promote the happiness of others in an undemonstrative way. When he left his home at Little Marlow he came to Clifton in 1853, and during his business career he had to bear the strain of heavy responsibilities. He, however, found relief in Leigh Woods, which reminded him of the beautiful scenes where his boyhood was spent. He chiefly delighted in studies of the trees which are the glory of that attractive locality.

For many years the deceased was greatly interested in the coal trade in the neighbourhood of the city. Mr Henry Wethered, with his brothers Joseph and Edwin, joined their brother-in-law, Mr Handel Cossham, in colliery enterprises, first at Parkfield and later at Kingswood; and for a short time, their father, Mr William Wethered, was associated as a proprietor. These collieries, which were developed more and more until they comprised about 3,000 acres of freehold mineral property, and gave employment to an average of 1,500 workpeople, were also interesting from the fact that some important geological discoveries were made in the course of the working. In the year 1878, the firm was turned into a limited company for the purchase of the interest held up to that time by Mr Henry Wethered and his brothers. Subsequently the colliery property passed almost entirely into the possession of Mr Cossham and Mr H. O. Wills.

The deceased was interested in the management of some local financial undertakings. Forty or fifty years ago he was concerned with the late Mr Williams (accountant) in conducting the Bristol Marine Insurance Company, and for 35 years Mr Henry Wethered acted as director of the London and South Western Bank, whose Bristol branch is at the corner of Corn Street and Small Street.

He was an ardent Liberal, and took an active part in Bristol elections when Mr Samuel Morley and Mr K. D. Hodgson became the representatives of the city in Parliament, entertaining Mr Hodgson at his residence, Devon House, Kingsdown Parade. Subsequently the deceased removed to 8, Woodland Road, Tyndall's Park, which, with a space adjoining, he purchased, the additional ground enabling him to manifest his love of flowers. Not only did he delight in horticulture, but he manifested talent as a poet as well as a painter. Some of his pictures were exhibited at the Fine Arts Academy in Queen's Road, and as to his poetry, a delicate lyric set to music was appreciated when given at the Victoria Rooms. It is an extraordinary circumstance that not until he was 73 years of age did Mr Wethered give an expression to his poetical feelings; and another curious fact in connection with his attainments was that he was a self-taught artist, and did not handle a brush till he was 49 years of age. He must have possessed an inborn love of Art to have been able to do what he did. In connection with his own work in the direction of painting may be mentioned the circumstance that Mr Swaish, the eminent local portrait painter, was commissioned by Mr Wethered's fellow bank directors to paint his portrait, and it is hung in the board room in London.

The deceased's sister, Miss Elizabeth Wethered, in 1848 married Mr Handle Cossham. She has been dead some years. His surviving brother, Mr Edwin Wethered, is a Poor Law Inspector, and in that capacity occasionally visits Bristol. His son, Mr E. H. C. Wethered (named after Mr Handel Cossham) is the well-known barrister of the Western Circuit, who has an office in Albion Chambers.

16/04/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Rev. F. J. Bullen

The death occurred suddenly on Thursday evening of the Rev. F. J. Bullen, who for the past three years was curate at St Silas, Bristol. Deceased was on a visit to a friend at Knowle, and died from heart failure before medical aid could be procured. The late Mr Bullen was at Gloucester College in 1886 and was ordained deacon in 1887 and priest in the following year. As curate he was at St Philip and Jacob from 1887 to 1890, and at Klive, Somerset, 1890-91. At Littleton-on-Severn he was rector 1891-97, and later went to Southampton, and thence to St Silas, Bristol.

18/04/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Frederick William Stoddart
Mr Frederick William Stoddart, consulting analyst, who passed away on Saturday, after a short illness, at his residence, Grafton Lodge, Sneyd Park, at the age of 57, was the eldest surviving son of Mr W. W. Stoddart, a chemist of North Street, Stoke Croft, who was the first city analyst. Mr F. Wallis Stoddart first took to surgery, but on his father's death, succeeded him in the office named. When the City Council decided to appoint an analyst who would devote the whole of his time to the duties, Mr Stoddart resigned, and Mr Edward Russell received the appointment. Mr Stoddart will be remembered as the inventor of a patent method of dealing with sewage bacteriologically, which has been adopted by over seven hundred corporate and other bodies in all parts of the world. It was first adopted at Horfield, but the sewage works were abandoned when the boundaries were extended. The rights were transferred to Mr Charles Walker, of Denmark Street, a few years ago.

23/06/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Henry Herbert Meade-King

We regret to record the death of Mr Henry Herbert Meade-King, who passed away yesterday morning at 19, Royal York Crescent, Clifton at the age of 79. The deceased gentleman was a well-known figure in the city and the district, and was one of the oldest solicitors of Bristol. He was the fourth son of Mr R. K. Meade-King of Walford, near Taunton, and was articled to Mr L. O. Bigg, of this city. He was admitted a solicitor in 1882, eventually becoming a partner with Mr Biggs, and continued to practice in Bristol until his retirement in 1911. He married Miss C. A. C. Clark, elder daughter of Mr G. C. Clark, of Ellenthorp, Tasmania, who died in 1884. There are two sons in the business of Meade-King, Cooke, Wansey, and John Miller, formerly of Baldwin Street, and now of 24, Orchard Street, and the deceased also leaves a daughter.

05/07/1916

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Louis P. Nott
The death of Mr Louis P. Nott, of Stoke House, Stoke Bishop, has removed in the prime of life a citizen who was keenly interested in the social betterment of the people, and who for many years had been especially prominent in the promotion of temperance and religious work in this city.

Mr Nott became associated with the late Mr T. A. Walker when that gentleman was engaged in the construction of the Severn Tunnel and was thus able to become conversant with the details of that remarkable engineering scheme. He married a daughter of the famous contractor, and later became personally responsible for the execution of important railway and dock works. The fact is locally interesting that about the time the Royal Edward Dock was being constructed by the celebrated London firm of John Aird and Co., a Bristolian - Mr Nott - was entrusted with the execution of a corresponding project at Liverpool. At one period Mr Nott was returned to the Council for the District Ward, but remained for a short time only a member of that assembly. To the cause of temperance he devoted much time, and on several occasions headed deputations when it was desired to place before the Licensing Justices the views of those who desired the curtailment of drinking facilities. His interest in temperance work was part of his devotion to religious work in general. On several occasions he lent his support to important missions conducted in this city, and Gideon Chapel - the old place of worship in Newfoundland Road with which Mr George Muller and Mr Cralk were for some time the pastors - in its recent history owed very much to Mr Nott, who assumed a large share of responsibility for its maintenance and services. He also carried on a mission at Salford, near Manchester. Mr Nott had been ill for several weeks, and passed away at 10.15 last night. His death will be widely regretted, and the deceased gentleman will be much missed in the sphere in which he was so conspicuous a figure.




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