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Western Daily Press

Obituary


Colonel Arthur Mowbray Jones
DEATH OF COL A. M. JONES
We regret to have to announce the death of Colonel Arthur Mowbray Jones, late commanding officer of the Bristol Rifle Volunteer Corps, which occurred very suddenly at his residence, Alexandra Road, Clifton, yesterday morning. The deceased officer, who was widely known and greatly respected in volunteer circles, held a commission for some five or six years in her Majesty's 75th and 27th Regiments of Foot, and served with the former for some little time in India. At the commencement of the Volunteer movement he joined the ranks of the Bristol Rifle Corps, then in course of formation, and was appointed Adjutant with the rank of Captain, being one of the first, if not the first adjutant gazetted to a volunteer regiment. After serving in that capacity for some years he was promoted to the rank of Major under Colonel Phillpotts Wright Taylor who was then the commanding officer. On the decease of Colonel Taylor, some nine or ten years ago Colonel Samuel Taylor, the senior major, was gazetted Colonel. Under his resignation of that position, after holding it for about two months, Colonel Jones was appointed commanding officer, which honourable post he held until some eighteen months ago, when, to the regret of those with whom he had been associated for so many years, he tendered his resignation. The late Colonel Jones was possessed of a fine, commanding presence and soldierly bearing, and his sudden death is a most unexpected blow to his family and friends. His age was about 63. On Wednesday afternoon he was at the Zoological Gardens, Clifton, in the management of which he took a deep interest, until six o'clock, and on arriving home appeared to be in his usual health. About one o'clock in the morning he was attacked with an apoplectic seizure, and Dr Board, of Caledonia Place, was at once sent for. He however, did not rally, and death ensued between three and four o'clock this morning. In addition to his volunteer duties, Colonel Jones had for many years interested himself in the management of the Zoological Gardens of which company he was a director and hon. secretary. An enthusiastic botanist, and an accepted authority in botanical circles, it was in a great measure owing to his care and attention the Zoological Gardens were so well kept. It may be mentioned that at the recent visit of the British Association to Bath the arrangement of the exhibition of ferns was entrusted to Colonel Jones.

During his lengthened connection with the Rifle Corps - upwards of 28 years - Colonel Jones gained the warm esteem and respect of the members. He had occupied an onerous position in relation to the corps not only as commandant, but also during his adjutancy and since he severed active connection with the volunteer force, he, in various ways, manifested a practical interest in its welfare. At the distribution of the prizes to the members of the Rifle Corps at the Drill Hall on December 3rd, 1887, Colonel Hill, M.P., referred to Colonel Jones's retirement, remarked that the city and the country owed that officer a deep debt of gratitude for the manner in which he had devoted himself to the service. "Though his breast was not covered with medals,"

Colonel Hill remarked, "Colonel Jones had done service none the less faithful and useful, and he doubted whether there was a soldier in the English army who could show a more useful record."

In acknowledging the expressions of regret, Colonel Jones thanked the officers for the support which they had given him, and added some useful advice to the corps, and expressed solicitude for its future welfare.

In consequence of the death of Col. Jones, the officers' mess dinner, which was fixed for to-night, will not take place.

26/07/1884

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Ebenezer Austin
SUDDEN DEATH OF MR E. AUSTIN
We deeply regret to announce the death of Mr Ebenezer Austin, one of the proprietors of the Clifton Chronicle, which took place suddenly yesterday morning, at his residence, Rodney Place, Clifton. Mr Austin had suffered from heart disease for some time past, and about twelve months ago, on the recommendation of his medical advisor, Dr Marshall, he gave up business for a time and went to Ilfracombe for the benefit of his health. The change effected a considerable improvement, and Mr Austin was able to continue to take an active part in the editorial work of his paper up to the last. He was in the city on Wednesday, and was then appearing in his usual health, and he got up yesterday morning with the intention of again going down to Bristol, but while in the act of dressing he was taken ill, and before medical assistance could be obtained he had expired. The news of Mr Austin's death came quite as a surprise to his many friends in the city, in which he was widely known and universally respected, and although he had attained the age of 65, but few judged him to be so old on account of his robust appearance and his energetic and systematic business habits. Mr Austin was born at Bath on the 3rd of October, 1818, and his father was connected with the editorial staff of the Bath Chronicle and the Bath and Cheltenham Gazette. He received his early education at a dame and adventure school at Bath, was subsequently a student at Mr Slatter's academy, and on leaving school he joined the Bath Mechanics' Institute, and became an ardent member of the elocution class. Left an orphan in 1830, he was apprenticed in the following year to Mr George Wood, the proprietor of the Bath and Cheltenham Gazette, and he joined the reporting staff of that paper on the 14th June, 1836. In 1848 he severed his connection with the Gazette, and took up his residence in Bristol, where he was appointed by Serjeant Stephen, the official shorthand writer to the Bristol District Court of Bankruptcy, of the proceedings of which he furnished reports to the Bristol papers. In 1855 he succeeded Mr W. Matthews as the correspondent of the Times, and this position he retained up to the time of his death.

Subsequently Mr Austin became connected with the Clifton Chronicle, which was founded by Mr J. Burbidge in 1850, and he was associated with Mr C. T. Bleeck in the management of that paper until April, 1864, when the chronicle passed into his hands. In 1861 the deceased took a prominent part in the formation of the Bristol Histrionic Club, of which he was the first president, and there was seldom a performance at which he was not present and for which he did not write an original address. He dramatised "The Pickwick Papers" for the club, and was a warm supporter of the movement initiated by the club for providing and supporting the Bristol and Clifton lifeboat, which is stationed at Lossiemouth, North Britain. Mr Austin was the author of "Stray Leaves from the Note Books of a Provincial Reporter", which appeared in the Chronicle some years ago, and has since been reprinted in a small volume entitled "Anecdotage".

On the 20th October, 1881, Mr Austin completed his fifty years' connection with the press, and advantage was taken of the occasion to present him with an illuminated address, to "mark the appreciation of the energy and integrity by which he had been distinguished in his professional career, as well as his personal worth and kindly characteristics". From his long connection with the press Mr Austin was widely known, and his death will be deeply lamented among a large circle of friends. His wife died about seven months ago, and he leaves a son - Mr Alfred Austin, who for the last few years has been associated with him as a partner in the business - three daughters, and an adopted niece.

18/07/1901

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Charles Nash
DEATH OF MR CHARLES NASH
It is with regret that we have to announce the death of Mr Charles Nash, at his residence, Leopold Road, St. Andrew's. It is some twelve or fourteen years since the deceased gentleman took an active part in municipal or social matters, but for a very long period he was a leading figure in the commercial and municipal life of our city, having represented the ward of St. Augustine for 35 years. Practically his last appearance in public was at the visit of the Mayor and Corporation to the new offices of the National Telephone Company, when, as chairman of the local directorate, Mr Nash was present, and spoke with much of his old freedom and spirit.

Mr Charles Nash was at an early period of his career initiated into questions respecting the trade of Bristol, as for some time he occupied a position in the office of Mr Robert Bright. He was led to perceive the disadvantages under which the city then laboured, and subsequently became an energetic member of the Free Port Council. While a young man he joined Mr J. A. Jones in the business of timber merchants, and soon the firm of Jones and Nash acquired that position of eminence it has since maintained. The father of the deceased, Mr J. E. Nash, represented the ward of St. Augustine in the Town Council, and in 1851 Mr Charles Nash succeeded him, continuing to represent the ward until the 9th of November, 1886, when he was elected alderman, and Mr J. Walls became councillor for St. Augustine's in his stead. At the time of his death Mr Nash was father of the Council, and during many years he performed good service on various committees. For a long time he acted as chairman of the Docks Committee, a position which he relinquished when he found the interests of the Channel Dock Company, of which he became chairman, clashed with his duties towards the citizens. The warm interest which he experienced in the port of Bristol led him to accept a post of responsibility in the Bristol Steam Navigation Company, though subsequently he ceased to take part in the control of the company. Gentle and unobtrusive in disposition, the deceased gentleman took a great interest in the church work of the diocese, and as a member of the Diocesan Conference he lent much assistance to Bishop Ellicott when head of the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol. He was especially zealous in all that concerned St. Peter's, Clifton Wood, of which he was made churchwarden when the original building was converted from a Wesleyan chapel into a church. In politics Mr Charles Nash was a Conservative. He married Miss Wilson, a Bristol lady, who resided at Queen's Parade, but has been dead many years. Mr Nash leaves several children. His brother, Mr Joseph Haynes Nash is well-known in connection with some important commercial undertakings. the late Mr Nash, who was for a number of years one of the magistrates for the city, was also president of the Chamber of Commerce in 1874, succeeding in that office the late Sir Philip Miles, who had held the post of president of the local chamber for the long period of 15 years. He was a member of the directorate and chairman of the Western Counties and South Wales Telephone Company, and when that concern was acquired by the National Telephone Company, he became chairman of the local directorate. Warmly interested in all which affected the welfare of the citizens, he took a deep interest in the movement for the introduction of free libraries in Bristol, and he seconded the resolution, moved by the late Sir Joseph D. Weston, submitted to the ratepayers at the Colston Hall in May, 1874, in favour of the adoption of the Free Libraries Act. Mr Nash retired from the aldermanship in October, 1888. Of late years he has been closely identified with the parish of St. Bartholomew, in which he held the position of lay reader.

The funeral will take place at Arno's Vale on Saturday.

15/04/1902

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Mr John Sharland


DEATH OF MR JOHN SHARLAND
Considerable regret will be caused by the announcement of the death of Mr John Sharland, who for six years served in the Council for St. Philip's North. Mr Sharland had taken a deep interest in labour questions, and although very few in the Council Chamber shared his views, his fellow members soon learned to appreciate the man and to listen with the greatest attention whenever he addressed them. Members of the Docks Committee particularly had opportunities of becoming acquainted with him, for he devoted much time to the work of that important department, and upon his withdrawal was the subject of an appreciatory reference by the chairman of the time, Ald. Proctor Baker. Mr Sharland was not a robust man, and it was ill-health which compelled him to sever his connection with the Council, and to cease taking the part in labour movements that otherwise would have been his. In March, 1900, he was presented with an address signed by the president (Mr F. Sheppard) and secretary (Mr J. Curle), of the Bristol Trades' Council, and also by representatives of the Bristol Branch of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, and of Bristol Branch No. 2. This document was addressed "To our comrade John Sharland", and contained the following acknowledgment: "You have served the cause of labour well, and we unite in expressing our regret at the illness which compelled you to retire from the work you had at heart. The success which attended our efforts for social progress we feel are largely due to your ardent support and advocacy, and we are authorised to inscribe our names as a token of our admiration for the unflagging energies and sacrifices you have made on behalf of suffering humanity." Mr Sharland underwent an operation in London, and there was hope that he might be spared the ill-health of former years. Latterly, however, he has been the subject of a complication of ailments of an extremely trying character, and weakened by his maladies, he died from heart failure yesterday morning at Jubilee Road, St. George. He was 48 years of age, and leaves a widow and a son and daughter, both grown up. The funeral will take place on Saturday afternoon at Avon View Cemetery, St. George.

06/01/1909

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr Walter William Hughes
DEATH OF MR W. W. HUGHES
We regret to announce the death of Mr Walter William Hughes, the well-known house and estate agent, of College Green, Bristol. Mr Hughes had been gradually sinking during the last two months, and his death, which occurred at his residence, Downfield Lodge, Clifton, yesterday morning, was not therefore unexpected. The deceased gentleman was well known in many circles, commercial, civic, and philanthropic. He was son of Mr Walter Hughes, who founded the business to which Mr W. W. Hughes succeeded. With the growth of the undertaking the premises were extended to their present dimensions.

Mr Hughes was born in Bristol in 1833, and was educated locally. He was elected as councillor for St. Michael's Ward in 1890, and served for 15 years, during which time he was particularly interested in the docks. He was a member of the Docks Committee, and an advocate of a forward policy. He was also a member of the Electrical Committee from the commencement of the work until his retirement from the Council in November 1905. He was mover of committees for the new Municipal Buildings and the Municipal Art Gallery, and taking a great interest in the Cabot Memorial movement, he placed the tablet which appears on St. Augustine's Bridge, under the auspices of the local Antiquarian Society. He was a member of the committee which carried out the erection of the Cabot Memorial Tower on Brandon Hill, and the author of a monograph on the discovery. He was associated with several religious movements, including the Religious Tract Society. He was a director and chairman of the College Green Hotel Company for 30 years. He was registrar and surveyor to the Dean and Chapter of Bristol and Cathedral.

The deceased, though a Liberal was elected representative of St. Michael's Ward on independent grounds, and so thoroughly did he satisfy the requirements of the ratepayers that he held his seat without opposition. A staunch Nonconformist, he was associated with Pembroke Congregational Church, Clifton, of which place of worship he was senior deacon. He was also Sunday School superintendent. As an ardent member of the Peace Society, he represented the Bristol Young Men's Society, in 1850, at the Peace Congress held in Frankfort-on-the-Main, and when at Frankfort he passed in the street the Austrian General Hayman, then on his way to London, where he did not get the usual hospitable reception at the hands of everybody. The workmen of Messrs Barclay, Perkins, and Co., set upon him in consequence of his having flogged women in Hungary when putting down the revolution there. At the Continental Peace Congress held some months ago, Mr Hughes was again a delegate, and was the only member of the Congress present who had attended in 1850.

A prominent feature of the deceased's business career was his connection with the Bristol and West of England and South Wales Permanent Building Society. His father, Mr Walter Hughes, was one of the first directors, and in conjunction with Mr John Lucas, Mr John Perry, Mr H. R. Fargus, Mr Thomas Danger, and a few others brought out the society. The first meeting was held at the office of Mr Danger, Bush Chambers, Corn Street, in May, 1850. Although not appointed a director till his father's death, in 1877, Mr W. W. Hughes assisted in the formation of the society. At one time father and son owned a cottage delightfully situated on the Wye, near Tintern, and there they spent much of their leisure time. After his father's death Mr W. W. Hughes retained his interest in the cottage for several years, though at length he disposed of it. He had been three times married, and his third wife predeceased him. He left five daughters (one of whom, Mrs Mackenzie, is on the Senate of the University of Wales) and three sons, two in partnership with him in College Green, and the other who took high honours at Cambridge University.

04/11/1890

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Mr William Mack


DEATH OF MR WILLIAM MACK
We regret to announce the death, at the age of 61 years, of Mr William Mack, at his residence, Chatley House, Limpley Stoke. The deceased gentleman who had for many years been connected with Bristol, where for some time he carried on business in Park Street as publisher and bookseller, was born at Clipstone, Northamptonshire, his father, who was minister of a Baptist congregation at that place, having been educated at the college belonging to the denomination in Stokes Croft, Bristol, and was a friend of the celebrated Rev. Robert Hall when the latter was pastor of Broadmead Chapel. The deceased was connected with journalism at Newcastle-on-Tyne, and after acting in the capacity of reporter he came to Bristol about 40 years ago, and started in business as a bookseller and stationer in Wine Street. Thence he removed to Park Street where he continued in business for about twenty-five years. He also had a publishing establishment in London. He was the originator and first publisher of the "Birthday Scripture Text Book", which has had an enormous sale in a large number of editions. Upwards of a million copies have been sold including editions in the French and Italian languages. Mr Mack was formerly connected in Bristol with the Congregational Church at Castle Green. A number of the worshippers there banded together and, after meeting for services for some time in the old workhouse buildings, Pennywell Road, on the site of the present Vestry Hall, sufficient funds were raised, largely through Mr Mack's exertions, for the building of the chapel and schools in Stapleton Road. Mr Mack's connection with this place of worship continued up to the time of his death. As long as he was able he conducted the Women's Bible Class, and had not resigned the position of leader of the class at the time of his death. He was treasurer of the Bristol City Mission for a number of years, and had been a constant friend of that movement. He was also treasurer of The Friend-in-Need Society. He took an active part in carrying out improvements in the Baptist Chapel at Limpley Stoke, where the later years of his life were spent. Mr Mack gave largely to religious and benevolent objects in an unostentatious manner, and he will be much missed in Congregational circles. He had always been a hard worker, and the strain during the past few years had told on his health. In May last he went to America, and on his return, feeling strengthened by the change, he paid a visit to Scotland, where, however, his illness took a turn for the worse. He lay ill at Newcastle-on-Tyne for a considerable time, and had been at Limpley Stoke since the end of September. His strength gradually declined, and he died at half-past four o'clock yesterday morning. Both London and Bristol businesses will continue to be carried on by his sons. Mr Mack has left a widow to mourn his loss.

02/10/1895

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr John Lysaght
DEATH OF MR JOHN LYSAGHT
We regret to announce the death of Mr John Lysaght, which occurred yesterday morning at his residence at Springfort, Stoke Bishop. The deceased gentleman had been in ill health for some time, the cause of trouble being an affection of the throat, in regard to which he consulted experts in Bristol and London, but in spite of all that medical skill could accomplish, the malady has had a fatal termination. Mr Lysaght, who was a member of a well-known Irish family, from Mallow, County Cork, came to Bristol about forty years ago and commenced in the galvanised iron business, which was then in its infancy. He at first took premises in Temple Back but, subsequently, owing to the extension of the business, the St. Vincent's Iron Works in St. Philip's Marsh were acquired, where the undertaking was still further consolidated and extended. In order to secure an adequate supply of sheets of iron for galvanising, Mr Lysaght purchased the Swan Garden works at Wolverhampton, and at a later period he also acquired the Osier Bed works, which are now the largest sheet rolling mills in the world.

Following that enterprise, there was an extension of the Bristol works at Netham, where a new constructional department was opened, and spelter works were also established. The number of hands employed at Bristol was from 800 to 1,000, and there are probably more than that number engaged at the other concern mentioned. In 1881 the businesses were converted into a limited liability company under the title of "John Lysaght, Limited", but the shares were not offered to the public. Mr Lysaght was a justice of the peace for the city of Bristol, and he served the office of High Sheriff in 1882-3, during which period he suffered a severe bereavement in the death of Mrs Lysaght. There are three sons and three daughters. The eldest son, Mr F. Percy Lysaght, is a director of the company, and another son, Mr Gerald S. Lysaght, is also associated with the business. One of the daughters is the wife of Mr George de Lisle Bush. The deceased, who was in his 64th year, had a second residence at Hengrave, Suffolk.

Speaking at Russell Town, Congregational Church last evening, Sir William Henry Wills, M.P., referred to the sad event. He said he could not allow the occasion to pass without a reference to a loss which that neighbourhood had sustained that day in the death of one intimately associated with the business pursuits of East Bristol for many years. He referred to the death of Mr John Lysaght. Mr Lysaght and himself never saw eye to eye in some things, but he had always had a great regard for him as an honourable and upright man of business. He commenced in a small way of business, and he extended his industries until they were very far reaching. He was an employer of a great number of men, not only in Bristol, but in other parts of the kingdom. He had been associated with Mr Lysaght in the direction of important works, and had always regarded him as a man in whom the fullest confidence could be placed, and whose word was as good as his bond. He was sorry they had been deprived of an influence so beneficial in point of trade and so high in point of moral integrity.

15/02/1893

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Sir Charles Wathen
SUDDEN DEATH OF SIR CHARLES WATHEN

The intelligence that Alderman Sir Charles Wathen had died suddenly in the Council Chamber yesterday afternoon created a sensation as painful in the breasts of citizens as did the announcement of the sudden death of Mr James Ford at the Constitutional Club a few years ago, and the recent news that Judge Metcalfe had expired at the Guildhall while preparing to go to the bench. For some time past Sir Charles had complained of being unwell, and stated that he had pains in the region of the heart. There was a quarterly meeting of the Municipal Council yesterday, and just before noon, when the proceedings commenced, he was observed by Mr Cleverdon leaning against Lloyd's Bank in Corn Street. Mr Cleverdon accosted him, and jocularly asked if he was surveying anything. Sir Charles replied in the negative, and, pressing his left side, remarked that he felt severe pain. Before entering the Council House he told Mr Charles Wills that he did not feel very well. He took his seat in the Council Chamber, and sat on the front padded bench near where Alderman Low usually sits, that gentleman being absent through illness. Nothing unusual occurred during four hours, there being a long agenda, no fewer than twenty-two notices appearing upon the paper. As four o'clock approached Mr H. N. Abbot proposed that an adjournment should take place, and the remainder of the business remain over to a day to be fixed. This resolution was seconded, and was about to be put to the meeting by the Town Clerk, when Sir Charles Wathen rose and urged that before the Council separated a motion of which he had given notice might be considered; it was next in order and was of a pressing character. The subject was a proposal to permit space between the old Drawbridge and the Stone Bridge, now covered, to be the site of an industrial exhibition on a large scale similar to one held at the Drill Hall about eight years ago. Sir Charles Wathen felt considerable interest in this project, and so impressed many members of the Council with its importance that, upon the house dividing whether there should be an adjournment forthwith or that the subject should be debated, a majority expressed themselves in favour of discussing the proposition at once. There was a strong opposition on the part of some of the members of the Council to the space in question being utilised in the manner advocated by Sir Charles Wathen, and a meeting of the Fixed Bridge Committee was held on Monday to object to the scheme. The resolution was moved by Sir Charles in a straightforward speech, and he referred to points which should make the proposal favourably received. Alderman Dix, who was a prominent champion of the fixed bridge, spoke against the spot being used for an exhibition; and after him Mr W. Howell Davies spoke.

It being four o'clock no disposition was apparent to prolong the debate, but Mr George White, who had expressed himself adverse to the proposed site and favourable to the large open space in Baldwin Street being that where the exhibition should be held, was expected to address the house, and he rose and spoke. He had called in question the accuracy of some figures as to the sizes of the respective sites in Baldwin Street and the Drill Hall with adjoining premises where the last great show of the kind was located. Sir Charles now and then interposed, insisting upon the correctness of the measurements he had given, but nothing unusual was noticed till just before half-past four, when he fell from his seat. Mr Charles Wills was sitting near, and he at once rushed to his assistance, and Alderman Fox and Sir George Edwards, who were sitting on a side bench, also assisted, and they laid Sir Charles upon the floor. In an instant the chamber presented a scene of confusion. Members got up hurriedly from their seats, and with the Town Clerk, the treasurer, and the assistant clerk (Mr Sampson) strove to learn the nature of the seizure. Dr Cunningham, one of the councillors, was present, and he at once did all that medical skill could suggest, and some brandy and water having been obtained, a small quantity of the liquid was administered. Sir Charles breathed heavily, but seemed quite unconscious. Meanwhile another medical gentleman was sent for, and Dr. R. H. Baxter, of Barrow Lane, Barton Hill, arrived. It was however apparent that Sir Charles was beyond aid. The Mayor (Mr W. R. Barker) announced the meeting at an end, and with Alderman Fox drove to Ashley Down to break the intelligence of the seizure to Lady Wathen. Soon after their departure the two doctors announced life extinct. The body remained upon the carpet near a table at which the civic officials sit, and the members of the Council, having taken a last look at the remains, slowly retired. The sad intelligence of the tragic termination of the sitting soon spread through the centre of the city, and Mr F. W. Lewis, nephew of Sir Charles, who is a partner at the establishment in Broad Street, was fetched. Mr E. W. Coathupe, the chief constable (who is also a skilled medical practitioner), and Dr Pickering, of Berkeley Square, also arrived. The Mayor and Alderman Fox found Lady Wathen at home, and in half an hour they had returned with her to the Council House. She arrived ignorant of her husband's death, and before anyone could intervene had rushed up the staircase and gained access to the room where she beheld his lifeless remains. A most distressing scene was witnessed, and Lady Wathen stayed in the chamber for about ten minutes, when she was assisted downstairs in an almost prostrate condition. In addition to Mr F. W. Lewis, Mr R. Hill, and Mr W. Hill, partners in the firm of Wathen, Gardiner, and Company, visited the Council House, in company with Mr H. G. Doggett, Sir Charles's legal adviser. The body was removed to Ashley House, Ashley Down. Sir Charles was to have given a dinner there last night, having invited the officers from Horfield Barracks.

The deceased, who was 61 years of age, was connected with the wholesale and export clothing trade, and had for an ancestor Sir Samuel Wathen, of Stroud, whose son was Sir Paul Bagot, he having assumed that name. A large mill near Stroud was called "Paul Wathen's mill", and the deceased's father, one of the firm who owned it, subsequently came to Bristol, as the firm was dissolved. Mr Charles Wathen went into business in the cloth trade and subsequently removed to Castle Street, where he became acquainted with Mr Henry Gardiner, wholesale clothier, of Broad Street. They entered into business relations, and, as Mr Henry Gardiner had decided to leave a commercial pursuit, it was decided that Mr Wathen should join Mr Charles Gardiner in partnership. The union continued for many years, and the reputation of the firm of Wathen, Gardiner, and Co. became extensive. Mr Wathen, who had married Miss Chase, paid a visit to Australia, and while there succeeded in transacting considerable business for the Bristol house. From the year 1872 to the year 1887 he was the head of the business which is at present carried on by Mr Robert Hill, Mr F. W. Lewis, and Mr W. Hill. After the deceased left the firm he continued to make the office his head-quarters. He was twice married, being after the death of his first wife wedded to Miss Sexton, of Ashburton. He had three adopted daughters, one of whom is married to Mr Kossuth Robinson.


Mr Wathen became a member of the Town Council in 1877, when he was elected for St. Paul's Ward in succession to Mr Thomas Wedmore. He continued to represent the constituency until November, 1889, when he was elevated to the aldermanic bench in the place of Mr Charles Nash, who resigned. In 1884 he was elected Mayor in succession to Sir Joseph D. Weston, and he filled the office in a manner that sustained the dignity of the civic chair. He was again elected to be chief magistrate in the following year, 1885-1886. Sir George Edwards was asked to allow himself to be nominated in the succeeding year; but subsequently Alderman Wathen was chosen, and altogether he was Mayor of Bristol six times, to the gratification of his fellow citizens. He took an active part in the work of important Council committees, and at the time of his death was chairman of the Streets Improvement Committee, the Floods Committee, and the Committee of Visitors to the Lunatic Asylum. He was also vice-chairman of the Finance Committee. In politics he was a Liberal till 1886, when he became a Unionist.

Outside the Town Council, where he always had considerable influence, especially in matters of fiance, the deceased took an active part in many movements affecting the welfare of the city. The Triennial Musical Festival, which another Mayor, Sir George Edwards, supported with public spirit, found in Mr Wathen a no less earnest friend, who not only interested himself in its success, but with the Mayoress received the large choir at the Mansion House. When the autumn session of the Baptist Union was held in Bristol he gave a reception to the President, the delegates, and their friends, and leading citizens at the Colston Hall; about 3,000 persons were invited. It was a well-known fact that he showed great liberality in connection with the Baptist Missions and one of the African stations on the Congo bears his name. When the United Presbyterian Church was formed in Bristol he became one of its strongest supporters and remained attached to it during the pastorate of the late Rev. Matthew Dickie. Afterwards he became connected with the Baptist denomination, though subsequent to becoming Mayor he felt a great regard for the Church of England, and for some years was a regular attendant at St. Mark's, College Green. He was a liberal contributor to the Cathedral Restoration and Bristol Bishopic Fund; and the thoroughness with which the restoration of the Mayor's Chapel was carried out a year or two ago was owing in a large measure to his generous support. When the Bath and West of England Society came to Bristol the council and friends found generous treatment from him, and the Indian and Colonial visitors, after a banquet in their honour at the Mansion House, and the ball which followed at the Victoria Rooms, were so impressed with the magnificent hospitality of the ancient city that they marked in a special manner their sense of this reception and sent a handsome gift, which Mr Wathen presented to the city, to be retained at the Mansion House. The important part he took in connection with the erection of the Queen's statue in College Green, and the reception and entertainment of Prince Albert Victor on the occasion of his visit to unveil the statue are not likely to be soon forgotten. On the 1st of January, 1890, the Marquis of Salisbury forwarded a letter to Mr Wathen stating that he was authorised to inform him that the Queen was pleased to confer upon him the honour of Knighthood, in recognition of the services which he had rendered to the city of Bristol during his mayoralty. One of the latest public acts of Sir Charles was to announce his intention of assisting in the Museum and Library in Queen's Road being handed over free of debt to the city, which meant a gift by himself of about £3,000. A short time ago he purchased Cook's Folly, and planned extensive alterations in order to adapt it for his residence. He had of late given up many engagements of a public character; and only two days ago, in reply to a communication from the Rev. A. N. Blatchford, who is president of the Cambrain Society, he wrote a courteous letter announcing that he had given up attending public dinners. Mr Doggett, the coroner, was made acquainted with the sudden death of Sir Charles Wathen, but he stated that there was no necessity for an inquest, as the medical evidence showed death to be attributable to syncope.

07/11/1895

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Rev. Caldicott
DEATH OF MR CALDICOTT
We regret to have to record the death, at the age of 66, of the Rev. Dr. Caldicott, whose sudden indisposition on Sunday was followed by symptoms of a very serious nature. He was for some time unconscious, and early yesterday morning expired. It is now twelve years since Dr Caldicott left Bristol, and the younger generation have little knowledge of the prominence he occupied in a variety of departments of civic life. He was a Birmingham man, educated at King Edward's Grammar School in that town, and continuing his studies at Jesus College, Oxford University, where he took his degree with honours. The story of his appointment to the Bristol Grammar School is well and briefly told by Mr John Latimer, from whose Annuals of Bristol we quote it.

"During the spring of 1859 the local Charity Trustees entered into correspondence with the Charity Commissioners in reference to certain proposed alternations in the scheme under which the Grammar School was governed. Although the success of the school since its re-organisation exceeded all hopes, yet, through the slenderness of the endowment, the head-master and teaching staff had been inadequately remunerated for their labours. It was consequently suggested that the fees paid by the elder class of boys should be slightly raised, that admission should not be restricted to youths residing in the city and suburbs, and that the head and second masters should be allowed to take boarders. The last mentioned proposal was strongly condemned by a minority of the trustees; and, though approved by the Charity Commissioners, the Master of the Rolls, on an appeal for his interference, refused to give it his sanction. Mr C. T. Hudson, the head-master, in consequence, resigned his post in May, 1860. He was succeeded by the Rev. J. W. Caldicott, M.A., tutor and mathematical lecturer at Oxford University, under whom the school attained an unexampled reputation, the successes of its pupils in competitive examinations being in some years proportionally greater than in any other public school. Dr Caldicott resigned his post in 1883, on being appointed to the valuable college living of Shipston, Worcester. He was succeeded by Mr R. Leighton M.A., who had taken high classical honours at Oxford."

When Dr Caldicott became master of the Grammar School it was of course carried on in the old buildings at the corner of Unity Street and Denmark Street, the site now occupied by that fine home of technical instruction - The Merchant Venturers' College. There were at that time 170 boys in the school, and the staff consisted of nine masters. Under Dr Caldicott's superintendence the school grew in reputation, importance, and in usefulness. Its transference to its splendid new headquarters in Tyndall's Park occurred in 1879 and by that time the students had increased exactly a hundred and the staff had grown to 14 masters. The move was one of the important epochs in the history of the old institution, and the scheme was the outcome of an immense deal of thought and care on the part of the governors and the head-master. The opening day was Saturday, May 17th, 1879, and it was made memorable by the presence and speech of one who was mainly instrumental in changing the whole aspect of elementary education in this country - the Right Hon. W. E. Forster. To an audience which crowded the great hall he spoke long on his favourite topic, education, and having stated that he had been making inquiries about the school he congratulated the fathers and mothers of Bristol on its possession. Its excellence was proved, he reminded them, by the honours and results which had been attained in competition at the Universities and elsewhere, and, added the Right Hon. gentleman, "I need not remind you mainly that we owe that to Dr Caldicott and his staff". There were other references similar in tone at that great gathering. The chairman of the governors, Mr Herbert Thomas, alluded to the origin of the institution, to some features of its history, and then followed a declaration which deserves reproducing. "At no time since 1532 had they possessed a head-master more worthy to guide and train the youths of the city than they now possessed in the Rev. Dr. Caldicott". Dr Caldicott had occasion to remember the meeting, for on behalf of many of the old boys was presented to him a beautiful silver centre piece, with an illuminated address, worded as follows :-

"On the inauguration of the new buildings of the old Grammar School, we, the former pupils of the school, beg you to accept the accompanying gift as a heartfelt acknowledgment of the debt of gratitude we owe to you, not only of much kindness shows to many of us personally, but for the great and lasting service you have rendered us all as citizens in maintaining and extending the usefulness of the school, and securing for it - we hope for all time - that place amongst the public schools of the country which is due both to the school itself and to the ancient city of Bristol. We feel that to you chiefly the city owes this new era upon which the school is now entering, and in the continuance of your head-mastership for may years to come she will find the best possible security that the school will continue to be an honour to herself and a faithful Alma Matar to her citizens. In this work we pray that every blessing may attend you, and that you may find in your future pupils a respect as true and an affectionate sympathy as deep as is felt in the hearts of the former pupils of the school."

The removal of the school to the high level did not check the satisfactory progress, but rather tended to augment it, and when Dr Caldicott gave up his post to leave a busy town for the quiet of a country rectory, he had the satisfaction of seeing a school in the heyday of prosperity with 328 scholars and 17 masters. The quality of the teaching was admittedly high. In the nine years 1855 to 1863 inclusive, the school gained 18 distinctions in Oxford and Cambridge, and it was reported on Speech Day 1883 -the last that Dr Caldicott attended before his departure - that for the last ten years (1873 to 1883) there had been gained on average as many such honours every year as they gained in the whole of that period of nine years to which reference had been made. Even still more remarkable as a testimony to the solidity of the mental building done under Dr Caldicott's regime was another fact mentioned at the same gathering, viz., that at Oxford old scholars were on the teaching body in four out of twenty-one colleagues; that one was similarly engaged in one of the most important colleges at Cambridge, and one was professor of mathematics in the University College of London. In discussing his merits as a schoolmaster with those who knew him best, there is only one matter in which criticism is ever heard - Dr Caldicott in some cases scarcely realised that everybody had not the same splendid physique and mental capacity for hard work with which nature had endowed him.


Not only was he an ardent educationalist but a remarkably keen politician also. His convictions were not of the milk-and-water sort, and his outspoken views were heard at meetings of the old Liberal Association which came to an end when Bristol was parted into four divisions for the purposes of parliamentary representation; and at public gatherings his tall figure was familiar at many an Anchor board on Colston Day, and on such occasions he generally had a share in the toast list. When Mr W.E. Forster's Education Act came into force, and Bristol was called upon to create a School Board, he became one of its members, and with Mr Justice Norris, then practising in the Western Circuit, he was an uncompromising foe to anything that appeared to savour religious inequality. Those were the days when the religious difficulty was bugbear in regard to board school education. There had not been the experience showing the working of the simple Scriptural instruction such as that given in the Bristol board of schools with such satisfactory results, and both Dr Caldicott and Mr Norris were whole-hearted members of the Birmingham League, which went in for purely secular teaching in board schools. It was a position not many clergymen have occupied, but Dr Caldicott was by no means an ordinary man, and unorthodoxy had no terrors for him. His Liberalism survived the trial which removed so many from the ranks of the party, and as recently as the last general election he was taking part in a Liberal gathering in Worcestershire.

When Dr Caldicott's connections with Bristol was ceasing there were many references to his valuable work. One of these was by Mr Samuel Morley, then M.P. for the city. In the course of a long address delivered at the Grammar School in August, 1883, he said - "Speaking for himself he could most truthfully say that among many precious memories connected with the city of Bristol, there were none that would be more thoroughly gratifying to himself or the subject of more precious recollections, than the friendship which he was thankful to say had been formed between Dr Caldicott and himself. He had many a time been thankful for the clearness, the straightforwardness, the independence, and the great intelligence which, as he thought, had distinguished his friend, and he thankfully and publicly recognised in his presence the obligations under which he had [UNCLEAR] and that in the seclusion of retirement to which he was about to resort, he might have those enjoyments which must result from the consciousness of having most nobly done his duty." Sentiments like these found no lack of endorsement, and Dr Caldicott was not allowed to go without tangible expressions of the esteem in which he was held. At the meeting at which Mr Morley delivered the address quoted from, the head boy, H. L. Smith, desired to acknowledge the great service of the retiring head-master and explained that a sum of £250 had been contributed to form a presentation fund. The form of the testimonial was in itself an evidence of Dr Caldicott's zeal as an educationalist and of his love for his old school, for by his desire the amount subscribed was used as an endowment fund for the school library. Dr Caldicott's own speech was full of good feeling, and of cordial recognition of the help he had received in the school from Mr Openshaw, the second master, and from the governing body, who "full, perfect, and frank confidence" he especially acknowledged. The words with which he concluded were indicative of the manner of the man, and are noteworthy in days when denominationalism has become recrudescent. "He would venture to express a hope that neither governors nor masters would consent to any change in the fundamental principles on which the school was governed. Mr Morley had spoken with just criticism of the attempts lately made to construct public schools which should be specially connected with the Church of England. He should have been glad to have heard Mr Morley extend his criticism - he did not imply he did not do so - to all schools which set up a narrow and confined basis of operations. He did not believe in the moral effect of schools confined to this or that class in social condition any more than he believed in the good moral effect of schools confined to this or that section of religious belief. England was what she was not because they had rich people on one side, and poor people on the other, not because they had well-born people on one side and vulgar people on the other, not because they had people of one religious belief on one side and people of another religious belief or without any religion at all on the other, but England was great because, whatever might be the distinction of class, of religion, or of political principles, all stood together in time of danger as one man. It was the unity of feeling in Englishmen that compensated for the lack of her population and for the smallness of their home territories. It was that unity of feeling which great schools like that were intended to maintain. Let them not take their rich boys, or their well-born boys, or their Church of England boys and train them together to think themselves the salt of the whole earth and to treat others as vulgar outcasts from their ranks. On the other hand, let them not select the poor children or the so-called ill-born children, and allow them to learn lessons of narrowness from the example set on the other side. Rather let it be the endeavour to teach English boys to mix together and be united, and depend upon it, if they succeeded in inspiring them as boys in the spirit of unity, they would hereafter find them prepared to stand shoulder to shoulder against world."

On August 1st, good-bye was said to Dr Caldicott at a dinner at the Clifton Down Hotel, which was attended by a crowd of leading people in this part of the world. Mr H. Thomas, Chairman of the Governors, presided, and he joined in the hearty recognition of the good work Dr Caldicott had done. After his health had been drunk the rev. gentleman was presented with a service of plate of the value of about 150 guineas. This led to more kindly speech-making, and Mr Lewis Fry added his testimony to that of Mr W. H. Wills, not then knighted, and other speakers. At a later date Dr Caldicott came back to Bristol and met many of his old students at dinner at the Montague. Although far removed from the scene of the labours of the best part of his life, he continued to feel an interest in the institution that had been his pride,and in July last he was present at the dinner of old boys held in London, and in responding to the toast of "The Old School" he said as a former head-master of Bristol Grammar School he felt proud of the success in life which had been achieved by his former pupils, and the honour which they had thereby conferred on a great educational institution.

Dr Caldicott was also rural dean of South Kineton. He was Select Preacher at Oxford 1889 to 1891, was J.P. for Warwickshire and Worcestershire, an alderman of the Worcestershire County Council, and chairman of the Charities Committee of the Council. He leaves a widow and two sons.

08/02/1892

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Dr G. F. Burder
DEATH OF DR BURDER
The announcement of the death of Dr G. F. Burder, of Clifton, will be received with widespread regret. The deceased had practised in Clifton during the whole of his career, and he took the warmest interest in the Bristol General Hospital and the Bristol Medical School. He was connected with the Hospital for nearly thirty years, and was senior physician for a considerable period, while his services as lecturer at the Medical School were very highly appreciated by the faculty. Beyond the medical profession Dr Burder was widely known as a clever meteorologist. He occasionally lectured on the subject, and was a frequent contributor to the Daily Press on meteorological subjects. The deceased had been in failing health for some time, and had been obliged to relinquish a portion of his practice in consequence. He frequently complained of pains in the chest after much exertion, and it was feared that that arose from an affection of the heart. On Saturday evening Dr Burder attended a dinner and scientific meeting at the Queen's Hotel, and afterwards walked to his residence, 7, South Parade, Clifton, arriving there shortly after ten o'clock. He appeared much distressed, and his nephew, Mr E. J. Burder, expressed regret that he had not ridden, the doctor's reply being that it scarcely seemed worth while to ride so short a distance. These were the last words he uttered, as almost immediately afterwards the doctor sank into a chair and expired. The deceased was 67 years of age and unmarried. His nephew, Mr E. J. Burder, lived with him, and the Vicar of Bedminster is another nephew. The deceased was a man of high character, and there were few who were more universally esteemed, and consequently his death will be lamented by a very large circle of friends. Only last Thursday Dr Burder delivered a lecture before the Bristol Naturalists' Society. He retained the position of Consulting Surgeon at the General Hospital up to the time of his death.

13/10/1893

Western Daily Press

Obituary


Mr John Frederick Lucas

DEATH OF ALDERMAN LUCAS
The announcement of the death of Alderman J. F. Lucas, which took place yesterday, at his residence, Ponsford, will occasion much surprise, as well as widespread regret, as Mr Lucas was present at the meeting of the Town Council on Tuesday, and apparently in his usual health. It appears that on reaching home that evening he was seized with a sudden faintness, and on Wednesday the illness was of so serious a nature that Dr. E. Long Fox was called upon to visit the patient. In the evening he was reported to be slightly better, but inquiries made yesterday morning elicited replies which caused considerable anxiety, and between three and four o'clock it became known that a telegram had been received by relatives in Bristol conveying the news that the Alderman had passed away. Mr Lucas had suffered from Bright's disease, but we understand that death was due to an affection of the heart. The deceased was about 62 years of age, having been born on the night of the Bristol riots. He was head of the firm of Lucas Brothers, and Co., African merchant, of this city, and was a director of Daniel Sykes and Co, Limited. He had been an alderman of the city since 1868. He rarely took part in discussions in the Council; but he was always recognised as a man of sound judgment and good business ability. He served on the Watch Committee, and was also a member of the Committee of Visitors at the Lunatic Asylum, and he has been a justice of the peace for the city for many years. Deceased leaves a widow, one son - Mr E. C. Lucas, a partner in the business - and five daughters, one of whom was recently married to Mr Alan McArthur. Formerly Mr Lucas lived at Stapleton, but he resided for many years at 111 Pembroke Road, afterwards removing to Yatton, and about two years ago he took a residence at Ponsford.

20/04/1891

Western Daily Press

Obituary

Mr Walter Macliver
The death of Mr Macliver removes from among the older citizens of Bristol one who has been closely associated with works of local progress, and whose energy was largely devoted during the generation which is passing to the maintenance and development of national interests. The columns of this journal, of which he was the founder, and to the time of his death the proprietor, are scarcely the place in which to attempt to portray those qualities of mind and heart which gave him a special position among his contemporaries and secured for him the affectionate regard of those who knew him best. The pen which has to record his death in the journal in which he was so long interested is subject to so many restraints as to deprive it of the freedom in which a natural desire to eulogise without exaggeration would wish to indulge. The acknowledgment of his deserts as a citizen, and as a politician, must come from others. But while this task must be delegated to those who are acquainted with Mr Macliver's career as a journalist and member of Parliament, it will outrage no canon of modesty if the writer of this note lays upon his bier a simple wreath as a token of purely personal esteem. In a large city men may come and men may go, but the community goes on forever; and each generation builds its own monument in the works it leaves behind. Although it is true, as Robert Browning has finely said, that it is not what a man does that exalts him, but what a man would do, the public measure of capacity is usually to be found in the work actually achieved; and if Mr Macliver's claim to remembrance were to be estimated in this way it is probable that he would not receive that full justice to which the dissemination of influence would entitle him. The daily journal which he established in the summer of 1858 has been issued on upwards of ten thousand separate days, and every day it has recorded incidents which in the aggregate constitute local and national history. The ideal newspaper has not yet been published; but it can be truly said for Mr Macliver that his earnest wish was that the papers he controlled should contribute something towards the elevation and entertainment of possible readers, and that they should be as free from objectionable features as careful supervision could make them. It was a proud satisfaction to him that at a period when the provincial newspaper press was in a transition state, and when to start a daily journal was to incur a great risk, he established an organ that for the first time gave the city reports of the debates in Parliament on the preceding evening, and that provided a medium for daily communication. A second source of satisfaction to him was that he was able to find employment for a large number of men. To these pleasures he added consciousness that he was helpful to movements which he believed to be useful either to the district in which he lived or to the nation. If this were the place to record them, innumerable instances could be given of his generosity; and of his urbanity, his consideration for others, and his abnegation of himself, those who knew him intimately will not need to be reminded. He had confidence in the future of Bristol, and he believed that the past thirty years have laid a groundwork of great promise. The work he did is not evanescent; and this is one of the consolations which come to us when the Great Reconciler Death, withdraws those who most deserve our love, and whose absence seems to leave a void that cannot be filled.

29/09/1919





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