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What this unit contains



What does it mean to be a Hindu? Respect for other people (shown through namaste) and all living things. Stories about Krishna: The story of Krishna the butter thief; the story of Krishna and Sudhama.


Values: The importance of caring for others. Hindus believe that God is seen in different ways and represented through different forms, such as Krishna.

Worship in the home: The shrine; The Arti ceremony; Prashad (food offered, blessed and served after prayer). The Festival of Raksha Bandhan demonstrating love and loyalty between members of the extended family.

Where the unit fits and how it builds upon previous learning



This is the second Unit of Hinduism in the Primary phase. It develops pupils' knowledge and understanding of Hindu beliefs about God from unit 1 by introducing them to a second avatar of Vishnu.


Extension activities and further thinking







  • Investigate examples of how adoption or fostering ensures that children have carers and how the needs of the child are met.
  • Explore the needs of the homeless locally and research practical ways in which people can / do help.


  • Explore how people care for animals.




Vocabulary
Hinduism Hindu God belonging

namaste


Krishna Sudhama respect honesty

truthfulness


worship shrine adoption foster

Arti


prashad prayer Raksha Bandhan


SMSC/Citizenship





  • Respect for all people.

  • Respect for all living things.

  • Concept of God being in all creation.






Unit 2 Session 1

Learning objectives





A
T
1


A
T
2

Suggested teaching activities

Focus for assessment



Sensitivities, points to note resources


Pupils should:

  • know that Hindus greet each other by saying ‘Namaste and that this means ‘my soul respects your soul and the spark of God inside you’;



  • know that Hindus respect all life – humanity and all living things;





  • consider the implications for belief that the world is a family;




  • consider Hindu attitudes to animals as a response to this belief.
















Explore & demonstrate greetings known by the class, celebrating the languages and cultures represented in the class. Explain that greetings often have ancient meanings, e.g. shaking hands shows you have no weapon in your hand. Do pupils know special meanings of other greetings?
Demonstrate the ‘Namaste’ greeting. Explain its meaning to pupils. Placing hands together and slightly bowing towards the other person usually accompany it. Discuss pupils’ views about the Hindu belief that we, the soul, live in the heart, and that God is there with us on our journey throughout life. Emphasise the respect paid to each other is part of Hindu beliefs about the soul, which is a part of God.
Give out pictures of people from around the world, young and old, male and female. Explain that Hindus believe that all human beings are one family. Make group collages of the ‘world family’ and write down words describing feelings about belonging to a family of all human beings everywhere to accompany artwork.
Consider other parts of creation, e.g. do animals have awareness and feelings? Do they have souls? Hindus believe that animals are part o f our family. How might believing this influence Hindu ideas of how humans should behave towards animals?
Produce short reflective statements about how humans should behave towards all creation.




Resources

Pictures of people from around the world of different ages / genders.

Collage materials


My Hindu Faith (Wayland) page 27
N.B. Pupils may want to discuss where God is when people are being bad.

Hindus believe that God is all good. He is the source of everything, but not the source of evil. For example, the sun is the source of everything in this solar system, but there is no darkness in the sun. The sun is not the source of darkness. Only when we turn our back to the sun, do we see our own shadow. Similarly, evil occurs when we turn our backs to God.



Unit 2 Session 2

Learning objectives





A
T
1


A
T
2

Suggested teaching activities

Focus for assessment



Sensitivities, points to note resources


Pupils should:

  • consider the needs of babies and compare to dangers surrounding Krishna at his birth;




  • consider the range of people who help to bring them up and know that sometimes the carer who brings someone up is not their birth parent;












You might invite an adult and baby in to the class for this lesson. If you do, greet your visitors with ‘namaste’ as in lesson 1.
Show pupils pictures of babies. Ask how parents usually feel when they know a baby is on the way. Discuss the needs that babies have and how vulnerable they are. Generate words and phrases describing the many things that babies need / deserve for a good start in life, for example good food, drink, love, baths, fresh air… If you have a baby in the classroom talk about her/his needs, likes and dislikes.
Explain that the class are going to hear a story about a baby who needed a foster family to make sure he was safe.
Tell the story of Krishna’s birth and explain that that Hindus believe that this special baby was God come to earth for a special purpose. At the end of the story, talk about alternatives. For example what would have happened if Vasudev had not had good friends to rely on or if he had been too afraid to travel through the s storm?
Explain that Hindus believe that Krishna came for 3 reasons:

  • to protect the good;

  • to punish the wicked;

  • to teach about religion.

How does the story show the context for these actions?

Who was good?

Who was wicked?

What does the story teach about God?
Collate a class response and keep for the next lesson.






Resources

Story of the birth of Krishna e.g. from

The Heart of Hinduism Primary Resource Pack – Story of the birth of Krishna (STO 314) or

Re-tell stories Volume 5 ‘The birth of Krishna’ – Lewisham Education

Krishna murti / image

Pictures of babies

N.B. Be sensitive to the feelings of pupils who may not have been wanted.

Unit 2 Session 3

Learning objectives





A
T
1


A
T
2

Suggested teaching activities

Focus for assessment



Sensitivities, points to note resources


Pupils should:

  • know that Hindus believe that God has visited earth at different times for different purposes;




  • know Hindus believe that through Krishna God tells us that he, like us, enjoys fun; and in his fun there is never any selfishness or bad feeling towards others;




  • understand Hindu attitudes to cows through the story of Krishna.












Recall the story of Krishna’s birth from the previous lesson and remind pupils why Hindus believe Krishna came to earth. Explain that this is the second story of a visit of God to earth and with the pupils recall the story of Rama.


Focus on Krishna’s childhood. What sort of upbringing did he have? Explain that Krishna lived on a farm and was a lively little boy. Tell the story of Krishna the butter thief. Discuss responses to the story.

Assessment Task

Hand out statements describing Hindu beliefs about God and nature and ask the children to use these to either:


  1. write about what they know about Hindu beliefs about God or;

  2. why Hindus treat cows with respect;

linking their answers to what they know about Krishna.

Assessment Levels
Level 1 Attainment target 1

Pupils use some religious words and phrases to recognise and name features of religious life and practice. They can recognise symbols, and other verbal and visual forms of religious expression.



Level 2 Attainment target 1

Pupils use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people.

Pupils retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. They identify how religion is expressed in different ways.




Resources

Story of Krishna the butter thief e.g. from The Heart of Hinduism Primary Resource Pack (STO 201)


Pictures of cows

My Hindu Faith (Wayland) page 24

Hinduism Unit 2 lesson 3 information sheet: Hindu beliefs about God and nature


Unit 2 Session 4

Learning objectives



A
T
1


A
T
2

Suggested teaching activities

Focus for assessment



Sensitivities, points to note resources

Pupils should:

  • know that Hindus believe that Krishna shows humans what it is to be a good friend;




  • know the story of Krishna and Sudhama;




  • know that Krishna understood what Sudhama needed and supplied it.








Recall knowledge from previous lesson and talk about the outcomes of the task, inviting pupils to share some of the ideas that they had with the class.
Talk about what makes a good friend. In small groups, agree 3 qualities of a good friend and feed back to the class. Explain that through the story of Krishna and his friend Sudhama when they were grown up, Hindus believe we can learn that God is the friend of humans. In this story Krishna is an adult.
Retell the story of Krishna and Sudhama. Discuss the message of the story. Key question – why did Krishna help Sudhama and know what he needed without being asked? *
Begin a class friendship folder to include photographs and descriptions of friends of members of the class, descriptions of times when friends have helped them or they have helped their friends or newspaper cuttings of current local / national / international examples of friendship in action (the latter demonstrating the world family concept).
This is an opportunity to discuss how we should behave towards those who are not our friends and how we can be friendly to everyone.




Resources

Story of the Krishna and Sudhama e.g. from

The Heart of Hinduism Primary Resource Pack – Story of the birth of Krishna (STO 215) or

Re-tell stories Volume 3 ‘The story of Krishna and Sudhama’ – Lewisham Education
N.B. Teachers please note:

What answers could we endorse as being those of the tradition (while valuing all pupils’ answers).

e.g.:


  1. through love - when we love, we learn to know the mind and heart of that person;

  2. because he is God;

  3. because, as God, Krishna is in everyone’s heart and knows all our thoughts, desires, etc;

  4. also, Krishna helped Sudhama because the latter was selfless and detached – he had no personal desire for wealth.





Unit 2 Session 5

Learning objectives





A
T
1


A
T
2

Suggested teaching activities

Focus for assessment



Sensitivities, points to note resources


Pupils should:

  • know how Hindus worship Krishna as God in their temples on his birthday;




  • know that food is offered to God and then shared;




  • know that making offerings and sharing are a sign of love.








Explain that Hindus celebrate the birthday of Krishna as a special celebration. Pupils might compare this with special birthday celebrations in other religions. What happens at their birthdays? Parties, cards, gifts…
Show a video portion of the celebration of Krishna’s birthday. After the video has finished note what has been seen in the Hindu temple – greetings, lights, bells, arti, offerings, a feast, rocking the baby Krishna’s cradle, retelling and acting out the story.
Talk about the loving way that the story is enacted and that the worshippers show their love of God in many ways including offering flowers, fruit etc.
Make a card to send to a friend for Krishna’s birthday, decorating with images of peacock feathers, cow, Krishna, images from the story, or Hindu symbols. Inside the card explain why you think this person is a good friend.
Share coconut ice or barfi while the cards are being made.






Resources

Video:


Pathways of Belief: Hinduism

Card


Peacock feathers, pictures, faith symbol, Krishna murti

My Hindu Faith (Wayland) pages 8 & 9

Barfi or coconut ice. For recipe see The Heart of Hinduism Primary pack Teaching Idea 3.4





Unit 2 Session 6

Learning objectives




A
T
1


A
T
2

Suggested teaching activities

Focus for assessment



Sensitivities, points to note resources


Pupils should:

  • know that at Raksha Bandhan Hindus celebrate the special bond between brothers and sisters;







  • know that Hindus worship at home as well as in the Temple;




  • focus on the good in others and express sincere words of appreciation to their friends and colleagues.











Recall how sharing with someone is a sign of love. Discuss relationships between brothers and sisters in families. What is good about these relationships? (N.b. some pupils may have negative views of their siblings). Explain that in Hinduism the family is very important and that this is shown through the festival of Raksha Bandhan.
Show a section of video or film explaining this festival. Also, see how families worship at home and do not always need to go to the temple. Afterwards draw out the similarities and differences with worship in the Temple and ways to celebrate festivals seen in previous lessons.

Show pupils Rakhis or pictures or pages from books showing how these are worn. Explain that they are going to make a Rakhi to give to someone that they want to thank for being good to them – this could be a brother or sister, a parent, grandparent, carer or friend.

Make Rakhis and make a small gift tag for each one, appropriately decorated, containing a good wish and some words of appreciation for the person to whom it is going.
Write a set of class instructions for making a Rakhi and add, along with copies of the statements in the gift tags, to the friend ship folder from Session 4.






Resources

Espresso ‘Faiths’ CD Rom

Video: Pathways of Belief: Hinduism. Section on Raksha Bandhan

Books:


My Hindu Faith by Anita Ganeri (Evans) pages 22 & 23

My Hindu Faith (Wayland) page 20

Raksha Bandhan cards

Rakhis

Materials for making Rakhis – coloured wool / thread, feathers, beads, tinsel, shiny paper etc. glue.


http://www.theholidayspot.com/rakhi/make_colorful_rakhi.htm




Unit 2 Session 3

Hindu beliefs about God and nature




God is everywhere

God enjoys fun and is playful




God is inside each of us

God protects the world


We should protect the world
God is in all creatures

Cows are special

Humans should not eat beef


Krishna visited earth for a special reason
The cow is like a mother because she gives us milk and many good things to eat, e.g. milk, butter, cheese, yogurt

All of nature is very special





Southwark Education Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education Non-statutory units Page:







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