When A man Meets a woman What attracts members of the opposite sex ?

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When A Man Meets A Woman

What attracts members of the opposite sex ?

It's complicated, but on a molecular level, chemicals are at work.

The Love Drug

Why drag sex into Chemistry?

It happens that a romantic reaction to another human being sets off a chemical reaction in the body. It is no accident that we talk about sexual chemistry because the substances produced in the body are closely related to the amphetamine drugs. They include dopamine, norepinephine and particularly 2-phenylethylamine (PEA).

Dopamine Norepinrephrine 2-phenylethylamine (PEA)

Does the body go on producing these drugs ?

Yes, but unfortunately the body builds up a resistance to PEA, and after a couple of years or so, its effects wear off.


Is this the end of love?

By no means (Look, I'm telling this story).


Why?

Emotional reactions are produced by other chemicals. Long-term attachment leads to morphine analogues called endorphins being produced by the brain and produce morphine-like symptoms; relaxation, peace.....The pituitary gland in the brain secretes oxytocin, a nerve stimulant implicated in sensations during lovemaking (Oxytocin levels rise during intercourse). It also appears to be involved in the mother-child relationship; it helps uterine contraction in birth and production of milk.


Can we make someone fall in love with us by spiking their drinks with chemicals- like PEA ?

Funny you should say that; chocolate is rich in PEA. A 100 g bar contains up to 660mg of it (as well as other stimulants such as methylxanthine and theobromine). However, it is poorly absorbed by the body and therefore chocolate isn't an aphrodisiac. The body has to manufacture its own PEA.


So the lady may love M--- T---, but not for the apparent reason.
© Simon Cotton 1995

The Love Drug

Why drag sex into Chemistry?

It happens that a romantic reaction to another human being sets off a chemical reaction in the body. It is no accident that we talk about sexual chemistry because the substances produced in the body are closely related to the amphetamine drugs. They include dopamine, norepinephine and particularly 2-phenylethylamine (PEA).

Dopamine Norepinrephrine 2-phenylethylamine (PEA)

Does the body go on producing these drugs ?

Yes, but unfortunately the body builds up a resistance to PEA, and after a couple of years or so, its effects wear off.


Is this the end of love?

By no means (Look, I'm telling this story).


Why?

Emotional reactions are produced by other chemicals. Long-term attachment leads to morphine analogues called endorphins being produced by the brain and produce morphine-like symptoms; relaxation, peace.....The pituitary gland in the brain secretes oxytocin, a nerve stimulant implicated in sensations during lovemaking (Oxytocin levels rise during intercourse). It also appears to be involved in the mother-child relationship; it helps uterine contraction in birth and production of milk.


Can we make someone fall in love with us by spiking their drinks with chemicals- like PEA ?

Funny you should say that; chocolate is rich in PEA. A 100 g bar contains up to 660mg of it (as well as other stimulants such as methylxanthine and theobromine). However, it is poorly absorbed by the body and therefore chocolate isn't an aphrodisiac. The body has to manufacture its own PEA.


So the lady may love M--- T---, but not for the apparent reason.
© Simon Cotton 1995

Phenylethylamine

Exercises

1. Draw the structures of the primary amine isomers of 2-phenylethylamine where the amine group is attached directly to the benzene ring.

2. Draw the structures of any primary amine isomers where the amine group is not bound to the benzene ring.

3. Which of the above could be diazotized and turned into an azo dye by a suitable coupling reaction?

Draw the structure of one such dye that could be formed by coupling a suitable amine with phenol.

4. Is PEA acidic, basic or neutral. Why?

5. Explain what kind of intermolecular forces you would expect between PEA molecules.

6. Explain whether or not you would expect PEA to be soluble in water.

7. Suggest how 2-phenylethylamine might be prepared from ethylbenzene.

8. Look up the properties of amphetamine and draw its structure. Can you suggest any reasons for PEA acting the way it does?


Phenylethylamine

© Simon Cotton 1995
The Love Drug

Why drag sex into Chemistry?

It happens that a romantic reaction to another human being sets off a chemical reaction in the body. It is no accident that we talk about sexual chemistry because the substances produced in the body are closely related to the amphetamine drugs. They include dopamine, norepinephine and particularly 2-phenylethylamine (PEA).
Dopamine Norepinrephrine
Does the body go on producing these drugs ? (I assume liver, check this)

Yes, but unfortunately the body builds up a resistance to PEA, and after a couple of years or so, its effects wear off.


Is this the end of love?

By no means (Look, I'm telling this story).


Why?

Emotional reactions are produced by other chemicals. Long-term attachment leads to morphine analogues called endorphins being produced by the brain and produce morphine-like symptoms; relaxation, peace.....The pituitary gland in the brain secretes oxytocin, a nerve stimulant implicated in sensations during lovemaking (Oxytocin levels rise during intercourse). It also appears to be involved in the mother-child relationship; it helps uterine contraction in birth and production of milk.

Can we make someone else fall in love with us by spiking their drinks with the right chemicals?

Funny you should say that; chocolate is rich in PEA. A 100 g bar contains up to 660mg of it (as well as other stimulants such as methylxanthine and theobromine). However, it is poorly absorbed by the body and therefore chocolate isn't an aphrodisiac.

So the lady may love M--- T---, but not for the apparent reason.





PHENYLETHYLAMINE (PEA)

Suitable chapter heading: The Love Drug (ever heard of a molecule called Herbie?)

The Body Chemistry Drug / The Chemical behind Sexual Chemistry etc.
Our romantic reaction to another human being sets off a chemical reaction in the body. It is no accident that we talk about sexual chemistry because the substances produced in the body (WHERE?) are closely related to the amphetamine drugs. They include dopamine, norepinephine and particularly phenylethylamine (PEA). Unfortunately the body builds up a resistance to PEA, and after a couple of years or so, its effects wear off. Is this the end of love? By no means (Look, I'm telling this story) .

Other chemicals produce emotional reactions. Long-term attachment leads to morphine analogues called endorphins being produced by the brain and produce morphine-like symptoms; relaxation, peace.....The pituitary gland in the brain secretes oxytocin, a nerve stimulant implicated in sensations during lovemaking (Oxytocin levels rise during intercourse) It also appears to be involved in the mother-child relationship; it helps uterine contraction in birth and production of milk. (This is taken rather verbatin from the Time article and will need to be rephrased).

Curiously, chocolate is rich in PEA. A 100 g bar contains up to 660mg of it (as well as other stimulants such as methylxanthine and theobromine). However, it is poorly absorbed by the body (can we therefore say anything about where absorbtion doesn't take place?- check these facts).

So the lady may love M--- T---, but not for the apparent reason.

Thoughts: diagrams of these chemicals. Where do we do amphetamines (separate drug chapter?). Perhaps a drug chapter should tie things up, with the basic chemistry all done elsewhere. We shouldn"t forget the other "natural" amines like putrescine and cadaverine. (They can also cross-link with TM complexes as complexing and chelating agents)

Need in organic to get over the idea of functional group of course, one amine is much like another chemically and maybe physiologically.

References: A.Toufexis, Time, Feb. 15, 1993, 55; S.Hamilton, New Scientist, 19 Dec 1992, 26;A.Walsh, The Science of Love: Understanding Love and its Effects on Mind and Body; Helen Fisher, Anatomy of Love. (Can we get either of these books???)

PHENYLETHYLAMINE (PEA)
The Love Drug (ever heard of a molecule called Herbie?)

.

Our romantic reaction to another human being sets off a chemical reaction in the body. It is no accident that we talk about sexual chemistry because the substances produced in the body are closely related to the amphetamine drugs. They include dopamine, norepinephine and particularly phenylethylamine (PEA). Unfortunately the body builds up a resistance to PEA, and after a couple of years or so, its effects wear off. Is this the end of love? By no means (Look, I'm telling this story).


Other chemicals produce emotional reactions. Long-term attachment leads to morphine analogues called endorphins being produced by the brain and produce morphine-like symptoms; relaxation, peace.....The pituitary gland in the brain secretes oxytocin, a nerve stimulant implicated in sensations during lovemaking (Oxytocin levels rise during intercourse) It also appears to be involved in the mother-child relationship; it helps uterine contraction in birth and production of milk. .

Curiously, chocolate is rich in PEA. A 100 g bar contains up to 660mg of it (as well as other stimulants such as methylxanthine and theobromine). However, it is poorly absorbed by the body.


So the lady may love M--- T---, but not for the apparent reason.

References: A.Toufexis, Time, Feb. 15, 1993, 55; S.Hamilton, New Scientist, 19 Dec 1992, 26;A.Walsh, The Science of Love: Understanding Love and its Effects on Mind and Body; Helen Fisher, Anatomy of Love.


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