Why are some places special? A key Stage 1 re unit of work with Literacy Links



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Why are some places special? A Key Stage 1 RE Unit of work with Literacy Links

This unit was written by Annie Fisher (Literacy Consultant) and Dave Francis (RE Adviser)
Focus areas of enquiry: C: forms of expressing meaning; D: identity, diversity and belonging.
Key RE questions:

(a)

What places are special to me? Why are they special?

(b)

What places are special to members of a religious or belief community?

(Buildings used for worship, special places in the home)



(c)

What do the buildings that are special to religious or belief communities look like?




  • Do they have special places, objects, pictures or symbols?




  • How are these used?




  • What do they tell us about what people believe?


Focus religions: Hinduism and Christianity. NB: For this it will be necessary to visit a Hindu temple e.g. the Hindu temple in Bristol – see website www.bristolhindutemple.co.uk (phone 0117 9351007 to discuss a visit) and a Christian church of your choice.

In preparation for this unit it will be useful to:

Read the background information about Ganesha in the Teacher’s Resource Book for ‘A Gift to the Child’ (published by Simon & Schuster, available in 2 CD-ROMs from Articles of Faith). Bring or borrow a patchwork quilt to show children.



RE ‘Can-do’ statements
C1 I can recognise religious symbols and pictures and talk about them.
C2 I know what some Christian and Hindu symbols stand for and I can say what some of the art, music etc., is about.

D1 I can talk about things that happen to me.


D2 I can ask about what happens to Christians and Hindus with respect for their feelings.




RE objectives and
key questions


Main lesson content

Examples of literacy, cross curricular and
extension opportunities


Session 1

I can talk about things that happen to me (D1) including things I notice in the classroom.

What makes our classroom special for all of us?


Introduction

Explain that we are going to look carefully and think about our classroom where we work and play together every day.

Play version of ‘I Spy’ as follows:

Child stands up and turns round slowly with eyes shut while class says rhyme:

This is our classroom,
It belongs to you and me,
Look all around our classroom

And tell me what you see...”

Child gives clue about something that they see, e.g. I can see something beginning with ‘d’; I can see something red; I can see something made from wood etc.

Repeat a few times.

Explain that sometimes we don’t notice things around our classroom. We are going to play a noticing game. Children choose a place in the classroom where they will feel comfortable e.g. lying on carpet, leaning against a wall. They listen and look around while you play some appropriate calm music, e.g., ‘Usha Bala Elo’ from www.radiosrichinmoy.org/radio/46/

Come together and tell partner what you noticed. Ask, e.g.:


  • Did anyone notice anything interesting?

  • Did anyone see something they hadn’t seen before?

  • Did anyone see something that was specially to do with you; that shows you belong in this classroom?

  • If someone new joined our class, what could we do to make them feel that they belong here?

Finish by playing a variation of the opening game, but this time noticing each other. Class sit in a circle. Child stands up and turns round slowly with eyes shut while class says rhyme:

This is our classroom,


It belongs to you and me,
Look all around our classroom
And tell me who you see...”

Child opens eyes and sees who is in front of them. They choose a greeting gesture e.g. a smile, a bow, a handshake which the other child reciprocates and the two children swap places. Repeat with new leader etc.



Literacy Y1 Strand 9: Create short, simple texts on paper and on screen that combine words with images

  1. Make illustrated labels and captions for the classroom, either written and drawn or using ICT. Images could be drawn or photographed areas in the classroom. E.G. Our cloakroom – we keep our coats and PE bags here.

  2. Make similar captions for room/s at home – explain purpose to parents first. Ask parents to help children make a list of objects in the bedroom (and or other rooms) at home. Child brings list to school. Teacher models how the individual words can be extended e.g. sink – we wash our hands and brush our teeth here.

  3. Alternatively, the above could be applied to instructions e.g. Cloakroom – please keep tidy; Sink – please turn off taps.
  4. Write a list poem beginning ‘With my little eye I can see..” To do this, begin with shared writing as a class. Children give the teacher a list of words which she/he writes down the middle of the whiteboard or flip-chart e.g.


Lego

cloakroom

chair

tray


Model how each word can be extended and a list poem created e.g.,

With my little eye I can see…



  • a big box of Lego for us to play with,

  • a cloakroom full of coats and scarves,

  • the chair where my teacher reads stories,

  • a tray with my name on it.

Session 2

I can recognise (religious) symbols and pictures and talk about them (C1).

What makes my home special for my family?


Guess why it’s special game

Teacher shows a series of objects or pictures from her / his own home that represent ‘special’ things they enjoy about their home and also, importantly, home routines / rituals, or symbols of religion / belief, e.g. a souvenir brought back from a holiday, a cup to represent first cup of tea; towel to represent morning shower or night time bath; pebble to represent time spent relaxing in the garden; tin of cat / dog food to represent a loved pet; an item of clothing to represent someone else in the family.

Children have to ask questions to try to find out why each object is important.

Invite some children to come to the board and draw an object to represent something special from their home life. Encourage children to ask questions to try and work out what the object is and why it is special. (You may want to ask the child to whisper the answer to you so that you can move things along!)

Emphasise the idea that a small object can represent a big idea.

Literacy Y1 Strand 10 – Write chronological and non-chronological texts using simple structures


Strand 9 – Find and use new and interesting words and phrases

Write a shared class poem (taking ideas from children and teacher scribing) based on the idea that an object can ‘say’ something. You can start with very concrete things and move on to more metaphorical ideas as the children get the idea, e.g.:.


  • A coat says ‘Cold’

  • A bed says ‘Sleepy’

  • A book says ‘Read me’

  • A smile says ‘Play with me’

  • A tear says ‘I need a friend’

Take ideas from the children and build on this over a few days. Ideas do not have to make literal sense and ideally every child should have contributed at least one idea.

Session 3

I can talk about what happens to Ganesha in the story (D2).

Why is Ganesha important to Hindus?

Explain that we are going to learn a story that is very special for Hindu people. Light a story candle and tell the story of Ganesha

– either orally in your own words, or reading the text or use Smart Board

Or use symbol notation of the story.

Discuss / ask questions, e.g. What happens to Ganesha in the story? Does this story remind you at all of any other stories that you know? Did you like the story? Were there any parts you didn’t like?

Have an image/statue of Ganesha on a tray in a ‘mystery bag’.

Invite children to feel the shape of the statue through the bag (keeping it on its tray to show respect).

Reveal the statue and discuss children’s responses / questions. Ask what is special about elephants as animals (e.g. big ears for listening, strong, never forget, wise) and refer to any stories they know featuring elephants.

Finish by retelling the story from the symbol version, inviting the children to join in.


Literacy Y1 Strand 1- Retell stories, ordering events, using story language.

Strand 3 – Take turns to speak, listen to others’ suggestions.

  1. Give children individual copies of the symbol notation story. Practise retelling the story in pairs or small groups.

  2. In groups of four the children draw and make simple lolly-stick puppets of the characters (Shiva, Parvati, Ganesha as boy, Ganesha as elephant) and prepare their own dramatic retelling.

  3. Draw and write about your favourite part of the story.

  4. Read the story of the Gingerbread Boy and discuss the similarities and differences in the stories.

Session 4

I know what some Hindu symbols stand for and I can say what the murti of Ganesha means to Kedar (C2).

Why is Ganesha important to Kedar?

Remind children of the story of How Ganesha Came to Be from session 3.

Explain that we are going to find out about a Hindu boy called Kedar, for whom Ganesha is very important. Tell the story of Kedar’s puja, from A Gift to the Child, using the pictures from Kedar’s book.

Discuss the children’s comments about the pictures. Why is Ganesha important to Kedar? Is there anything that you do every day that is important to you?

Using an artefact of Ganesha, put together a shrine similar to Kedar’s in a quiet area of the classroom, agreeing with the children what should be included. Agree that we need to respect the shrine and the image of Ganesha because it is special and holy for Kedar and other Hindus. (See guidance in Puja for Ganesha on page 38 of Chapter 3. )


Literacy Y1 Strand 1- Retell stories, ordering events, using story language.

  1. Sequence the picture’s from Kedar’s book and retell the sequence of what he does.

  2. Tell another Ganesha story from A Gift to the Child. (See ‘A Story of Ganesha’).




Session 5

I can recognise religious symbols and pictures and talk about them (C1).

What are the special signs of the temple?

What do these signs mean?


Preparation for temple visit.

Show pictures of different places of worship including local places of worship– discuss.

Show pictures from Bristol Hindu temple of what we will see there:

www.bristolhindutemple.co.uk

Explain that we will see statues of many different gods in the temple, including Ganesha.




Literacy Y1 Strand 10 – Write chronological and non-chronological texts using simple structures;

Group written sentences together in chunks of meaning or subject

Strand 11 – Compose and write simple sentences independently to communicate meaning

In discussion with the children write a set of instructions for the temple visit.

Children can write their own checklist of what they need to do and bring for the visit.




Session 6:


Visit to Hindu temple

www.bristolhindutemple.co.uk


Session 7:

I can recognise religious symbols and pictures and talk about them (C1).

I can talk about what happens to others (D2) e.g., when they go to the temple.

What do Hindus do when they go to the temple?

Why is the temple important to the people who visit and pray there?


Follow up from temple visit.

Use photographs taken on the day to review what was done on the day and discuss what impacted on the children individually.

Ask children to say what they remember about the symbols and pictures they saw on the day.

Discuss why they think the temple is important for the people who pray there, and to recall what Hindus do when they go to the temple.

Discuss how we can record and remember our visit and what we could do to thank the priest and people from the temple. (See next column for ideas re thank you letter)



Literacy Y1 Strand 10 – Write chronological and non-chronological texts using simple structures;

Group written sentences together in chunks of meaning or subject

Strand 11 – Compose and write simple sentences independently to communicate meaning

  1. Write thank you letters independently - or model and compose a class letter together – each child then adds a sentence to say what they enjoyed most.

  2. Practice orally recounting the trip. Provide sentence starters e.g., On Tuesday we went… First of all… Next… We saw…

We found out that… My favourite part was…


  1. When fully confident orally children could write a recount of the day or make a zigzag book showing the sequence of events.

  2. As class or in groups, prepare an ICT presentation for parents or assembly.

Session 8

I can recognise Christian symbols and pictures and talk about them (C1).

I can talk about what is important to Christians (D2), e.g. in relation to objects and artefacts.

Why are these objects important to Christians?


Show a picture of the Christian church you are going to visit. Has anyone been there?

We have visited a Hindu temple. Soon we are going to visit a church where Christians go to pray.

Show some objects and artefacts from the church you are to visit, e.g. candle, bible, item of priest’s vestment, cross (or use pictures if this is not possible). Display artefacts and objects on cloth with the children sitting around.

Have a number of thought bubble cards prepared. Invite children to offer ‘I wonder..’ questions which teacher scribes and writes onto clouds e.g.



Give a thought bubble to children in twos or threes and invite each group to try to write (or have scribed) another question. If a priest or vicar is invited they can lead the discussion around the children’s questions.



Write class set of instructions or a checklist for the visit as for session 5.


Session 9:

Visit to Christian Church – depending on the iconography, architecture and style of the church (e.g. statues/stained glass windows) try to include one or more scriptural stories behind what is seen.



Session 10

I can recognise religious symbols and pictures and talk about them (C1).

I can talk about what happens to others (D2) e.g., when they go to the church.

What do Christians do when they go to the church?

Why is the church important to the people who visit and pray there?

Follow up church visit in similar way to temple visit.

Use photographs taken on the day to review what was seen on the day and discuss what impacted on the children individually. Ask children to say what they remember about the symbols and pictures they saw on the day.

Discuss why they think the church is important for the people who pray there, and to recall what Christians do when they go to the temple.

Discuss how we can record and remember our visit and what we could do to thank the priest and people from the temple. (See next column of ideas)



  1. Geography link - Have ground plan map of the church and small pictures or labels of objects seen – place these on the appropriate part of the map.

  2. Thank you letters – as session 6

  3. Recount writing or presentation as session 6




Session 11

I can talk about things that happen to me (D1) especially in relation to the idea of belonging.

Who do you belong to?

Is there a special place where you feel belong most of all?


Are there any special objects that remind you of where you belong most of all?


Discuss how one of the reasons Hindus visit their temple and Christians visit their churches is that they feel that they belong there specially. They also feel that they belong to God and that it is important to show this by going to the temple or church to pray.

Invite the children to create either:



Belonging Boxes – individual shoe boxes into which children stick and arrange objects, pictures and decoration that reflect their likes, the things that matter to them and the people that matter to them. For Art links or idea on how to present the belonging boxes see the work of Joseph Cornell http://www.josephcornellbox.com.

See also Smart board examples of Joseph Cornell boxes for looking at and discussing.



Or

A class ‘Patchwork Quilt’ – Show a real patchwork quilt to begin with. Each child is given a ‘patch’ of square or hexagonal paper. Each child draws/sticks things which reflect what is important to them and who they belong to. (Could, for example, include school logo, picture of family, drawing of pet, flower from own garden plus decorations/patterns in their favourite colours.)



Session 12

I can recognise symbols and pictures of religion / belief and talk about them (C1).

I know what some Christian and Hindu symbols stand for and I can recognise them as signs of belonging (C2).

What special signs show your ‘belonging’?

Drawing together ideas of belonging and symbolic gestures/actions/clothing from Hindu and Christian traditions – Bindi, sign of cross etc

See PowerPoint of Hindu symbols and Smartboard of Christian symbols or the Christian symbols picture, which are provided as a starting point

Other secular signs/gestures of belonging – Brownies, football teams, school uniform.

Concluding symbolic event – e.g. circle dance, game or sharing of food for whole class as a sign of all belonging. Ask children if they want to use some of the ideas they got from visiting the temple and the church in their event.

Display photographs showing the two visits and include each child’s face and name.



Strand 11 – Compose and write simple sentences independently to communicate meaning

Create class book of class memories from the two visits – children’s own pictures and ‘I remember when...’ sentences.





RECORD OF ATTAINMENT

KS1 Unit 7: Why are some places special? (C&D)

All pupils: (Performance Scale P8)

Most pupils - majority class expectation: (Level 1)

Some pupils: (Level 2)

  • begin to realise the importance of religious symbols and pictures and talk about them;

  • reflect on what makes them happy, sad, excited or lonely.

C1 can recognise religious symbols and pictures and talk about them.

D1 can talk about things that happen to them.



C2 know what some Christian and Hindu symbols stand for and I can say what some of the art, music etc., is about.

D2 can ask about what happens to Christians and Hindus with respect for their feelings














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