Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (wioa) Unified Plan Requirements



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Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Unified Plan Requirements

1/26/2016

















Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Unified State Plan Requirements

Table of Contents
Overview 2

State Plan Contents 3

I. WIOA State Plan Type 5

II. Strategic Elements 6

Economic, Workforce, and Workforce Development Activities Analysis 6

State Strategic Vision and Goals 27

State Strategy 30



III. Operational Planning Elements 36

State Strategy Implementation 36

State Operating Systems and Policies 40

IV. Coordination with Combined Plan Programs 52

V. Common Assurances 53

VI. Program-Specific Requirements for Core State Plan Programs 55


Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth Programs Activities and Assurances 63

Wagner-Peyser Act Program 69

Adult Basic Education and Literacy Programs 80

Vocational Rehabilitation 89

Appendix 1: Performance Goals for the Core Programs 148

OVERVIEW

Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified State Plan to the U.S. Secretary of Labor that outlines a four-year workforce development strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all jobseekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy.  States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers.  Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs.  WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. 


Options for Submitting a State Plan

At a minimum, a State must submit a Unified State Plan that meets the requirements described in this document and outlines a four-year strategy for the core programs. The six core programs are—



  • the Adult Program (Title I of WIOA),

  • the Dislocated Worker Program (Title I),

  • the Youth Program (Title I),

  • the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act Program (Title II), and

  • the Wagner-Peyser Act Program (Wagner-Peyser Act, as amended by title III),

  • the Vocational Rehabilitation Program (Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by Title IV).



How State Plan Requirements Are Organized.

The major content areas of the Unified State Plan include strategic and operational planning elements. WIOA separates the strategic and operational elements to facilitate cross-program strategic planning.



  • The Strategic Planning Elements section includes analyses of the State’s economic conditions, workforce characteristics, and workforce development activities. These analyses drive the required vision and goals for the State’s workforce development system and alignment strategies for workforce development programs to support economic growth.
  • The Operational Planning Elements section identifies the State’s efforts to support the State’s strategic vision and goals as identified in the Strategic Planning Elements section. This section ensures that the State has the necessary infrastructure, policies, and activities to meet its strategic goals, implement its alignment strategy, and support ongoing program development and coordination. Operational planning elements include:


    • State Strategy Implementation,

    • State Operating Systems and Policies,

    • Assurances, and

    • Program-Specific Requirements for the Core Programs, and

    • Program-Specific Requirements for the Combined State Plan partner programs. (These requirements are available in a separate supplemental document, Supplement to the Workforce and Innovation Act (WIOA) Unified and Combined State Plan Requirements. The Departments are not seeking comments on these particular requirements).

When responding to Unified State Plan requirements, States must identify specific strategies for coordinating programs and services for target populations.1 While discussion of and strategies for every target population is not expected, States must address as many as are applicable to their State’s population and look beyond strategies for the general population.


I. WIOA STATE PLAN TYPE


    • Unified State Plan. This plan includes the Adult Program, Dislocated Worker Program,

Youth Program, Wagner-Peyser Act Program, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act Program, and Vocational Rehabilitation Program.

OMB Control Number 1205-0NEW

II. STRATEGIC ELEMENTS

The Unified State Plan must include a Strategic Planning Elements section that analyzes the State’s current economic environment and identifies the State’s overall vision for its workforce development system. The required elements in this section allow the State to develop data-driven goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce and to identify successful strategies for aligning workforce development programs to support economic growth.



  1. Economic, Workforce, and Workforce Development Activities Analysis. The Unified Plan must include an analysis of the economic conditions, economic development strategies, and labor market in which the State’s workforce system and programs will operate.

    1. Economic and Workforce Analysis

      1. Economic Analysis. The Unified State Plan must include an analysis of the economic conditions and trends in the State, including sub-state regions and any specific economic areas identified by the State. This includes:

        1. Existing Demand Industry Sectors and Occupations. Provide an analysis of the industries and occupations for which there is existing demand.

        2. Emerging Demand Industry Sectors and Occupations. Provide an analysis of the industries and occupations for which demand is emerging.

        3. Employers’ Employment Needs. With regard to the industry sectors and occupations identified in (A)(i) and (ii), provide an assessment of the employment needs of employers, including a description of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required, including credentials and licenses.

      2. Workforce Analysis. The Unified Plan must include an analysis of the current workforce, including individuals with barriers to employment, as defined in section 3 of WIOA2. This population must include individuals with disabilities among other groups3 in the State and across regions identified by the State. This includes: —

        1. Employment and Unemployment. Provide an analysis of current employment and unemployment data and trends in the State.
        2. Labor Market Trends. Provide an analysis of key labor market trends, including across existing industries and occupations.


        3. Education and Skill Levels of the Workforce. Provide an analysis of the educational and skill levels of the workforce.

        4. Describe apparent ‘skill gaps’.



  1. Ecosystems Impact in Oklahoma on Occupations and Salaries

Oklahoma has identified five ecosystems important to the economy to generate wealth, have employment growth potential, or where the state has a competitive advantage (Aerospace and Defense, Energy, Agriculture and Bioscience, Information and Financial Services, and Transportation and Distribution). In each ecosystem, there are critical occupations necessary for future growth and advancement. In addition to the five statewide ecosystems, there are ecosystems at the regional level, complementary industries that are important for regional economies. The following charts highlight some of the high growth occupations in the various ecosystems.

Aerospace & Defense
Based on 2015 job numbers there are 112,650 jobs in the Aerospace & Defense Ecosystem in Oklahoma with average earnings of approximately $64,950.

As a projection of demand by 2020, total employment in the Aerospace and Defense ecosystem will increase to 118,100 jobs in Oklahoma, an increase of 5,450 jobs for the state.




Occupation

Jobs 2015

Jobs 2020

Change


Entry Requirements

Management Analysts

2,633

3,163

530

Bachelor's degree

Machinists

2,881

3,206

325

Long-term on-the-job training

Software Developers, Applications

1,776

2,034

258

Bachelor's degree

Aircraft Structure, Surfaces, Rigging, and Systems Assemblers

1,374

1,559

185

Moderate-term on-the-job training

Computer User Support Specialists

1,189

1,366

177


Moderate-term on-the-job training

Software Developers, Systems Software

1,037

1,205

168

Bachelor's degree

General and Operations Managers

1,863

2,030

167

Bachelor's degree

Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians

1,971

2,138

167

Postsecondary non-degree award

Civil Engineers

1,080

1,247

167

Bachelor's degree

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

892


1,054

162

Long-term on-the-job training

Computer Systems Analysts

945

1,105

160

Bachelor's degree

Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

584

728

144

Bachelor's degree
The list below encompasses some of the high growth critical occupations for the Aerospace and Defense ecosystem in Oklahoma. However, while these occupations are not solely intended to serve the Aerospace and Defense ecosystem, they are driven by demand and individuals with these work backgrounds will have transferable skills to other ecosystems.

Source: EMSI 2015.2

Energy
Based on 2015 job numbers there are 125,150 jobs in the Energy Ecosystem in Oklahoma with average earnings of $103,700.

As a projection of demand, by 2020 total employment in the Energy ecosystem will grow to 140,700 jobs in Oklahoma, an addition of 15,550 jobs for the state.


The list below encompasses some of the high growth critical occupations for the Energy ecosystem in Oklahoma. However, while these occupations are not solely intended to serve the Energy ecosystem, they are driven by demand and individuals with these work backgrounds will have transferable skills to other ecosystems.




Occupation

Jobs 2015

Jobs 2020

Change

Entry Requirements

Roustabouts, Oil and Gas

5,272

6,042

770

Moderate-term on-the-job training

Construction Laborers

2,429

3,100

671

Short-term on-the-job training

Service Unit Operators, Oil, Gas, and Mining

4,318

4,980

662

Moderate-term on-the-job training

Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers

4,384


4,930

546

Moderate-term on-the-job training

Petroleum Engineers

2,963

3,508

545

Bachelor's degree

Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

3,957

4,389

432

Postsecondary non-degree award

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

2,053

2,484

431

Long-term on-the-job training

Rotary Drill Operators, Oil and Gas

2,974

3,327

353

Moderate-term on-the-job training

General and Operations Managers

2,814


3,128

314

Bachelor's degree

Derrick Operators, Oil and Gas

2,045

2,302

257

Short-term on-the-job training

Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks

2,158

2,384

226

Moderate-term on-the-job training

Machinists

1,735

1,958

223

Long-term on-the-job training

Source: EMSI 2015.2




Agriculture & Bioscience

Based on 2015 job numbers there are 85,580 jobs in the Agriculture & Bioscience ecosystem in Oklahoma with average earnings of $53,675.

The list below encompasses some of the high growth critical occupations for the Agriculture and Bioscience ecosystem in Oklahoma. However, these occupations are not solely intended to serve the Agriculture and Bioscience ecosystem, they are driven by demand and individuals with these work backgrounds will have transferable skills to other ecosystems.



Occupation

Jobs 2015

Jobs 2020

Change

Entry Requirements

Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop, Nursery, and Greenhouse

6,962

7,124

162

Short-term on-the-job training

Civil Engineers

1,037

1,199

162

Bachelor's degree

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

1,013

1,174

161

Associate's degree

Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

360

474


114

Bachelor's degree

Customer Service Representatives

1,083

1,180

97

Short-term on-the-job training

General and Operations Managers

1,406

1,495

89

Bachelor's degree

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

549

623

74

Long-term on-the-job training

Management Analysts

358

425

67

Bachelor's degree

Interpreters and Translators

155

221

66

Bachelor's degree


Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians

346

402

56

Associate's degree

Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers

890

943

53

Short-term on-the-job training

Mechanical Engineers

505

552

47

Bachelor's degree


Source: EMSI 2015.2




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