World History General Knowledge, Processes, & Skills Social Studies Pacing Guide Reached throughout Year General Social Science Knowledge – embedded in World

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World History


General Knowledge, Processes, & Skills Social Studies Pacing Guide

Reached throughout Year
General Social Science Knowledge – embedded in World History standards and expectations and used throughout the course of study
General Knowledge – embedded in World History and Geography standards and expectations.

K1.1 Know the defining characteristics of the disciplines of history and geography.

K1.2 Know that each discipline is subject to criticisms and limitations; be aware of the primary criticisms of history and geography.

K1.3 Understand and analyze temporal and spatial relationships and patterns.

K1.4 Understand historical and geographical perspectives.

K1.5 Understand the diversity of human beings and human cultures.

K1.6 Analyze events and circumstances from the vantage point of others.

K1.7 Understand social problems, social structures, institutions, class, groups, and interaction.

K1.8 Apply social studies concepts to better understand major current local, national, and world events, issues, and problems.

K1.9 Integrate concepts from at least two different social studies disciplines.

K1.10 Understand significant concepts, generalizations, principles, and theories of history and geography as disciplines.
Social Studies Procedures and Skills – embedded in World History and Geography standards and expectations

P1 Reading and Communication – read and communicate effectively.

P1.1 Use close and critical reading strategies to read and analyze complex texts pertaining to social science; attend to nuance, make connections to prior knowledge, draw inferences, and determine main idea and supporting details.

P1.2 Analyze point of view, context, and bias to interpret primary and secondary source documents.

P1.3 Understand that diversity of interpretation arises from frame of reference.

P1.4 Communicate clearly and coherently in writing, speaking, and visually expressing ideas pertaining to social science topics, acknowledging audience and purpose.

P1.5 Present a coherent thesis when making an argument, support with evidence, articulate and answer possible objections, and present a concise, clear closing.

P2 Inquiry, Research, and Analysis critically examine evidence, thoughtfully consider conflicting claims, and carefully weigh facts and hypotheses.

P2.1 Understand the scientific method of inquiry to investigate social scientific and historical problems.

P2.2 Read and interpret data in tables and graphs.

P2.3 Know how to find and organize information from a variety of sources; analyze, interpret, support interpretations with evidence, critically evaluate, and present the information orally and in writing; report investigation results effectively.

P2.4 Use multiple perspectives and resources to identify and analyze issues appropriate to the social studies discipline being studied.

P2.5 Use deductive and inductive problem-solving skills as appropriate to the problem being studied.


P3 Public Discourse and Decision Making – engage in reasoned and informed decision making that should characterize each citizen’s participation in American society.

P3.1 Clearly state an issue as a question of public policy, trace the origins of an issue, analyze various perspectives, and generate and evaluate possible alternative resolutions.

P3.2 Deeply examine policy issues in group discussions and debates (clarify issues, consider opposing views, apply democratic values or constitutional principles, anticipate consequences) to make reasoned and informed decisions.

P3.3 Write persuasive/argumentative essays expressing and justifying decisions on public policy issues.

P4 Citizen Involvement

P4.1 Act out of respect for the rule of law and hold others accountable to the same standard.

P4.2 Demonstrate knowledge of how, when, and where individuals would plan and conduct activities intended to advance views on matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.

P4.3 Plan and conduct activities intended to advance views on matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.

Disciplinary Knowledge – embedded in World History and Geography standards and expectations
Historical and Geographical Knowledge and Perspective – Know significant periods and events in world history; social, religious, and political movements; and major historical figures who influenced such movements. Identify and define specific factual information, themes, movements, and general principles operating in world history and geography to deduce meaning and comprehend patterns.
Historical and Geographical Analysis and Interpretation – Distinguish value judgments in historical and geographical information, weigh evidence, synthesize information, apply knowledge, make judgments, formulate generalizations, and draw conclusions.
Global Analysis of World History Eras 4 – 8

World History



Month: September – 2 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide

Unit 1: Ancient Civilizations Review


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)



Essential

Questions/Scaffold

Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources

F1 World Historical and Geographical “Habits of Mind” and Central Concepts – Explain and use key conceptual devices world historians/ geographers use to organize the past including periodization schemes (e.g., major turning points, different cultural and religious calendars), and different spatial frames (e.g., global, interregional, and regional) (National Geography Standard 2, p. 186)

F2 Systems of Human Organizations – Use the examples listed below to explain the basic features and differences between hunter-gatherer societies, pastoral nomads, civilizations, and empires, focusing upon the differences in their political, economic and social systems, and their changing interactions with the environment. (National Geography Standard 14, p. 212)


  • Changes brought on by the Agricultural Revolution, including the environmental impact of settlements

  • TWO ancient river civilizations, such as those that formed around the Nile, Indus, Tigris-Euphrates, or Yangtze

  • Classical China or India (Han China or Gupta empires)

  • Classical Mediterranean (Greece and Rome)


F3 Growth and Development of World Religions – Explain the way that the world religions or belief systems of Hinduism, Judaism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam grew, including

  • spatial representations of that growth

  • interactions with culturally diverse peoples

  • responses to the challenges offered by contact with different faiths

  • ways they influenced people’s perceptions of the world. (National Geography Standard 6, p. 195)


F4 Regional Interactions – Identify the location and causes of frontier interactions and conflicts, and internal disputes between cultural, social and/or religious groups in classical China, the Mediterranean world, and south Asia (India) prior to 300 C.E. (National Geography Standards 3 and 13A, pp. 188 and 210

4.1 Cross-temporal or Global Expectations – Analyze important hemispheric interactions and temporal developments during an era of increasing regional power, religious expansion, and the collapse of some empires

4.1.3 Trade Networks and ContactsAnalyze the development, interdependence, specialization, and

importance of interregional trading systems both within and between societies including



  • land-based routes across the Sahara, Eurasia and Europe

  • water-based routes across Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, South China Sea, Red and Mediterranean Seas (National Geography Standard 11, p. 206)



4.3 Regional Expectations – Analyze important regional developments and cultural changes, including the growth of states, towns, and trade in Africa south of the Sahara, Europe, the Americas, and China.
4.3.1 Africa to 1500Describe the diverse characteristics of early African societies and the significant

changes in African society by



  • comparing and contrasting at least two of the major states/civilizations of East, South, and West Africa (Aksum, Swahili Coast, Zimbabwe, Ghana, Mali, Songhai) in terms of environmental, economic, religious, political, and social structures (National Geography Standard 12, p. 208)

  • using historical and modern maps to identify the Bantu migration patterns and describe their contributions to agriculture, technology and language (National Geography Standard 9, p. 201)

  • analyzing the African trading networks by examining trans-Saharan trade in gold and salt and connect these to interregional patterns of trade (National Geography Standard 9, p. 201)
  • analyzing the development of an organized slave trade within and beyond Africa (National Geography Standard 4, p. 190)


  • analyzing the influence of Islam and Christianity on African culture and the blending of traditional African beliefs with new ideas from Islam and Christianity (National Geography Standard 10, p. 203)


4.3.2 The Americas to 1500Describe the diverse characteristics of early American civilizations and societies in North, Central, and South America by comparing and contrasting the major aspects (government, religion, interactions with the environment, economy, and social life) of American Indian civilizations and societies such as the Maya, Aztec, Inca, Pueblo, and/or Eastern Woodland peoples. (National Geography Standard 10, p. 203)
4.3.3 China to 1500Explain how Chinese dynasties responded to the internal and external challenges caused by ethnic diversity, physical geography, population growth and Mongol invasion to achieve relative political stability, economic prosperity, and technological innovation. (National Geography Standard 4, p. 190)

How did regional interactions impact the growth of world religion and system of human organization throughout ancient civilizations?



Culminating presentation that compares and contrasts multiple ancient civilizations. Groups could present a paper, 2 visuals, and data.


Persuasive essay on how religion and geography impacted the growth of ancient civilizations’ government, economy, and culture.

Geographical recognition; students use maps, handouts, or internet, to recognize and locate ancient civilizations and utilizing the 5 themes of geography.

alliance

apostle

assassination

assimilate

barter


bureaucracy

caste


census

citizen


city-state

civilization

clergy

colony


decipher

delta


democracy

dictator

dowry

drama


dynasty

economy


empire

epic


ethics

fertile crescent

fresco

golden age



heliocentric

heresy


hierarchy

hieroglyphics

imperialism

infrastructure

legislature

messiah


missionary

monopoly

monotheistic

monsoon


mummification

Nile


oligarchy

pharaoh


philosophy

Pope


prophet

reincarnation

republic

Rosetta Stone

satirize

sect


shrine

subcontinent

veto

vizier



www.Worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu
School Textbook
National Geographic
www.mel.org
www.loc.gov
Google images and earth

World History

Month: September/October – 2 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide

Unit 2: Destruction of Ancient Civilizations and Rise of World Religions


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)


Essential


Questions/Scaffold


Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources


4.1 Cross-temporal or Global Expectations – Analyze important hemispheric interactions and temporal developments during an era of increasing regional power, religious expansion, and the collapse of some empires.
4.1.1 Crisis in the Classical WorldExplain the responses to common forces of change that led to the ultimate collapse of classical empires and discuss the consequences of their collapse. (See 4.3.3; 4.3.4; 4.3.5)
4.1.2 World ReligionsUsing historical and modern maps and other documents, analyze the continuing spread of major world religions during this era and describe encounters between religious groups including

  • Islam and Christianity (Roman Catholic and Orthodox) – increased trade and the Crusades

  • Islam and Hinduism in South Asia (See 5.3.3) continuing tensions between Catholic and Orthodox Christianity(National Geography Standard 10, p. 203)


4.1.3 Trade Networks and Contacts – Analyze the development, interdependence, specialization, and

importance of interregional trading systems both within and between societies including



  • land-based routes across the Sahara, Eurasia and Europe
  • water-based routes across Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, South China Sea, Red and Mediterranean Seas (National Geography Standard 11, p. 206)



4.2.1 Growth of Islam and Dar al-Islam – [A country, territory, land, or abode where Muslim sovereignty

prevails] – Identify and explain the origins and expansion of Islam and the creation of the Islamic Empire

including


  • The founding geographic extent of Muslim empires and the artistic, scientific, technological, and economic features of Muslim society

  • diverse religious traditions of Islam — Sunni, Shi’a/Shi’ite, Sufi

  • role of Dar al-Islam as a cultural, political, and economic force in Afro-Eurasia

  • the caliphate as both a religious and political institution, and the persistence of other traditions in the Arab World including Christianity (National Geography Standard 10, p. 203)


4.2.2 Unification of Eurasia under the MongolsUsing historical and modern maps, locate and describe the geographic patterns of Mongol conquest and expansion and describe the characteristics of the Pax Mongolica (particularly revival of long-distance trading networks between China and the Mediterranean world). (National Geography Standard 11, p. 206)
4.2.3 The PlagueUsing historical and modern maps and other evidence, explain the causes and spread of the Plague and analyze the demographic, economic, social, and political consequences of this pandemic. (See 4.3.5) (National Geography Standard 15, p. 215)

4.3.1 Africa to 1500Describe the diverse characteristics of early African societies and the significant

changes in African society by


  • comparing and contrasting at least two of the major states/civilizations of East, South, and West Africa (Aksum, Swahili Coast, Zimbabwe, Ghana, Mali, Songhai) in terms of environmental, economic, religious, political, and social structures (National Geography Standard 12, p. 208)

  • using historical and modern maps to identify the Bantu migration patterns and describe their contributions to agriculture, technology and language (National Geography Standard 9, p. 201)

  • analyzing the African trading networks by examining trans-Saharan trade in gold and salt and connect these to interregional patterns of trade (National Geography Standard 11, p. 206)

  • analyzing the development of an organized slave trade within and beyond Africa (National Geography Standard 4, p. 190)

  • analyzing the influence of Islam and Christianity on African culture and the blending of traditional African beliefs with new ideas from Islam and Christianity (National Geography Standard 10, p. 203)


4.3.2 The Americas to 1500Describe the diverse characteristics of early American civilizations and societies in North, Central, and South America by comparing and contrasting the major aspects (government, religion, interactions with the environment, economy, and social life) of American Indian civilizations and societies such as the Maya, Aztec, Inca, Pueblo, and/or Eastern Woodland peoples. (National Geography Standard 10, p. 203)

4.3.3 China to 1500Explain how Chinese dynasties responded to the internal and external challenges caused by ethnic diversity, physical geography, population growth and Mongol invasion to achieve relative political stability, economic prosperity, and technological innovation. (National Geography Standard 4, p. 190)


Analyze and explain the causes and consequences to the collapse of classical empires.


How did world religions spread during this era?
What were the major differences between religious groups?

Group Project: Groups analyze a specific ancient civilizations fall and the world religion that took over the region?


Geographic perspective: Student created map to show the spread of world religions.
Compare and contrast essay on one of the 6 major world religions of the era.

alliance

apostle

assassination

assimilate

barter


bureaucracy

caste


census

citizen


city-state

civilization

clergy

colony


decipher

delta


democracy

dictator

dowry

drama


dynasty

economy


empire

epic


ethics

fertile crescent

fresco

golden age



heliocentric

heresy


hierarchy

hieroglyphics

imperialism

infrastructure

legislature

messiah


missionary

monopoly

monotheistic

monsoon


mummification

Nile


oligarchy

pharaoh


philosophy

Pope


prophet

reincarnation

republic

Rosetta Stone

satirize

sect


shrine

subcontinent

veto

vizier



www.Worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu
School Textbook
National Geographic
www.mel.org
www.loc.gov
Google images and earth


World History

Month: October – 1-2 Weeks Social Studies Pacing Guide


Unit 3: Europe 500-1500 AD


Code & Content Expectations

(Disciplinary Knowledge)



Essential

Questions/Scaffold

Assessment

Vocabulary

Resources


4.1 Cross-temporal or Global Expectations – Analyze important hemispheric interactions and temporal developments during an era of increasing regional power, religious expansion, and the collapse of some empires.
4.1.1 Crisis in the Classical WorldExplain the responses to common forces of change that led to the ultimate collapse of classical empires and discuss the consequences of their collapse. (See 4.3.3; 4.3.4; 4.3.5)
4.1.2 World ReligionsUsing historical and modern maps and other documents, analyze the continuing spread of major world religions during this era and describe encounters between religious groups including

  • Islam and Christianity (Roman Catholic and Orthodox) – increased trade and the Crusades

  • Islam and Hinduism in South Asia (See 5.3.3)

  • continuing tensions between Catholic and Orthodox Christianity (National Geography Standard 10, p. 203)

4.1.3 Trade Networks and Contacts –Analyze the development, interdependence, specialization, and

importance of interregional trading systems both within and between societies including


  • land-based routes across the Sahara, Eurasia and Europe

  • water-based routes across Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, South China Sea, Red and Mediterranean Seas (National Geography Standard 11, p. 206)


4.3.4 The Eastern European System and the Byzantine Empire to 1500Analyze restructuring of the Eastern European system including

  • the rise and decline of the Byzantine Empire

  • the region’s unique spatial location

  • the region’s political, economic, and religious transformations

  • emerging tensions between East and West (National Geography Standard 3, p. 188)


4.3.5 Western Europe to 1500Explain the workings of feudalism, manoralism, and the growth of centralized monarchies and city-states in Europe including

  • the role and political impact of the Roman Catholic Church in European medieval society

  • how agricultural innovation and increasing trade led to the growth of towns and cities (National Geography Standard 14, p. 212)

  • the role of the Crusades, 100 Years War, and the Bubonic Plague in the early development of centralized nation-states (See 4.2.3)

  • the cultural and social impact of the Renaissance on Western and Northern Europe


How was the Roman Empire split between east and west and why did the east become the Byzantine Empire?


How did feudalism, manoralism, and the growth of centralized monarchies and city states effect Western Europe?

What role did the Crusades, 100 Years War, and Bubonic Plague have on the development of European nation states?

Geographic perspective: use charts and graphs to demonstrate the development of European nation states during the Middle Ages.


Compare and contrast 2 of the following 3 devastations to European development: the Bubonic Plague, the Crusades, and the 100 Years War.
Create a story board to show the changes from feudalism to absolute monarchies.

apprentice

Canon Law

capital


charter

contract


corruption

ex-communication

feudalism

fief


friar

Germanic


guild

interdict

journeyman

knight


manor

Medieval


middle class

monastery

partnership

Pope


reform

sacrament

secular

serf


Tenant Farmer

vassal
Black Death

commercial

Common Law

crusade

due process



epidemic

Gothic


Holy Land

inflation

inquisition

jury


Lay Investiture

Reconquista

revolution

scholasticism

vernacular



www.Worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu
School Textbook
National Geographic
www.mel.org
www.loc.gov
Google images and earth




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