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Review Comments:

No comments.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

286,427

Category: High Priority



305,820

Category: High Priority



306,308

Category: High Priority




Project: 198902700 Power Repay Umatilla Basin Project
Sponsor: BPA
Short description

Provide power or reimbursement of power costs to Bureau of Reclamation for Umatilla Basin Project pumping plants that provide Columbia River water to irrigators in exchange for Umatilla River water left instream.

Abbreviated Abstract

In the 1980’s, CTUIR and ODFW began implementing the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. An integral part of that effort was to address inadequate flow and migration conditions by constructing fish passage facilities, initiating a trap and haul program, and implementing the Umatilla Basin Project flow enhancement effort. The Power Repay Project objective is to increase adult and juvenile migrant survival in the Umatilla Basin. The project produces survival benefits for both hatchery and natural production by providing power or reimbursement of power costs for operation of the Umatilla Basin Project Columbia River pumping plants. These pumping plants provide water for irrigation usage in exchange for instream, natural Umatilla River flows and storage water designated for fish passage enhancement. The Umatilla Basin Project is the key component of the Umatilla Subbasin instream flow enhancement effort.

The project began in 1990 with power cost reimbursement for an interim fish/flow exchange until the Umatilla Basin Project was implemented. Phase I of the Umatilla Basin Project was completed and began operations in 1993. Since then, project costs have increased as Phase II of the Umatilla Basin Project has been implemented and power costs have escalated. Increases in juvenile and adult migration survival associated with the enhancement effort have occurred annually and contribute directly to the NPPC rebuilding goals.

Relationship to Other Projects

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

8802200

Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations

Project 8802200 provides oversite and coordination of Umatilla Basin Project which provides flow enhancement for juvenile and adult migration for which proposed project funds power costs.

8343600

Umatilla Passage Facilities O&M

Projects 8343600 and 8802200 operate and maintain passage facilities to maximize passage benefits associated with the Umatilla Basin Project which proposed project funds power costs for.

8902401

Umatilla River/WEID Screens M&E

Umatilla Basin Project provides flows for operation of passage facilities.

8403300

Umatilla Hatchery O&M

Umatilla Basin Project provides passage flows for juveniles produced at Umatilla Hatchery.

8343500

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities O&M

Umatilla Basin Project provides passage flows for juveniles released by project 8343500.

9000500


Umatilla Hatchery M&E

Umatilla Basin Project provides passage flows for hatchery adults and juveniles monitored by project 9000500.

9000501

Umatilla Basin Natural Production M&E

Umatilla Basin Project provides passage flows for natural adults and juveniles monitored by project 9000501.

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies

As stated in Section 9.b., inadequate passage conditions for both upstream and downstream migrants were the primary contributor to the extirpation of salmon and decline of steelhead in the Umatilla Basin. Flow would continue to be a limiting factor in the basin restoration effort if not for the Umatilla Basin Project. The objective of the project is directly related to the goals and objectives stated in the Subbasin Summary by assisting in the restoration of salmon and steelhead populations in the Umatilla River by increasing the tributary survival of migrating adults and juveniles.

There is one specific strategy in the Subbasin Summary which identifies needed actions directly related to the Power Repay Project. Strategy 4 (Protect, enhance, and restore instream flows to improve passage conditions and increase rearing potential for anadromous and resident fishes in the Umatilla River Basin.), Action 4.1 is to continue operations of the Umatilla Basin Project.

The project goal of assisting in the restoration and rebuilding of salmon and steelhead populations in the Umatilla Basin is directly related to the Council’s mandate to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by development and operation of the hydropower system. Though the project falls under the Columbia Plateau Ecological Province for which specific objectives and strategies will be adopted later, the project does address the Council’s Basin-level biological objectives listed in the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. More specifically, the project objective of increasing tributary survival directly addresses the three items listed in Section III.C.2.a.1. (Anadromous fish losses); halt declining population trends, restore natural populations, and increase adult runs.

The Power Repay Project is also directly related to two RPA actions listed in the NMFS 2000 FCRPS Biological Opinion. Although not specifically identified in Action 149 or 151, the project is directly responsible for increasing tributary flows as identified in those actions and as listed under Section 9.6.2.1 (Actions Related to Tributary Habitat).

The Power Repay Project was an outcome of the Umatilla Basin Project Act passed by Congress in 1998. As part of the Act, BPA was required to provide power to operate the fish/flow exchanges. This is a non-discretionary requirement and BPA has entered into retail service agreements with Umatilla Electric Co-op and Pacific Power to fulfill this obligation.

Review Comments:

No comments.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

1,750,000

Category: High Priority



1,750,000

Category: High Priority



1,750,000

Category: High Priority




Project: 198903500 Umatilla Hatchery Operation and Maintenance
Sponsor: ODFW
Short Description:

Restore Umatilla River Chinook and steelhead fisheries and populations through release of subyearling and yearling smolts produced at Umatilla Hatchery

Abbreviated Abstract:

This proposal funds operation and maintenance of Umatilla Hatchery. The hatchery proposal is one of six strategies identified by the ODFW, CTUIR, and others to restore anadromous fish production including reestablishing salmon production through hatchery releases and supplementing steelhead populations using endemic broodstock (Umatilla Subbasin Umbrella). The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) adopted the Master Plan in 1990 as part of its Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and Umatilla Hatchery began operating in 1991. Master Plan goals anticipate production of 5.5k adult summer steelhead, 8.0k adult spring chinook, 12.0k adult upriver bright fall chinook, and 6.0k adult coho. These goals include both natural and hatchery production expectations. Since Umatilla salmon were extirpated, non-indigenous stock were used to initiate this program. Steelhead supplementation uses endemic stock. Initial planning focused on release of 210k endemic summer steelhead smolts, 2.23M Carson spring Chinook, 7.0M upriver bright fall Chinook, and 1.0M Tanner Creek coho to meet these goals. Umatilla Hatchery goals were established based on an anticipated well capacity of 15k gpm and were 210k steelhead, 1.29M spring Chinook and 5.94M fall Chinook. Production from other Columbia Basin hatcheries would produce the remainder. The Three Mile, Pendleton ODFW, Thornhollow, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem (Imeques), Bonifer and Minthorn satellite facilities were planned for the Umatilla basin to support these efforts. Some adjustments to this initial program have been made as a result of program experience and facility limitations. The most notable of these limitations is that Umatilla Hatchery well capacity proved out at only 5k gpm. Umatilla Hatchery production objectives will be 150k summer steelhead (71% of goal), 360k spring Chinook (28% of goal), and 600k fall Chinook (9% of goal). The fall chinook program has been reduced from 2.68M to 600k until factors that limit post release survival of fall chinook are identified and solved. Umatilla Hatchery is operated by ODFW and Umatilla satellite facilities by CTUIR in a coordinated manner under an Annual Operating Plan (AOP) developed under the Umatilla Management, Monitoring and Evaluation Oversite Committee (UMMEOC).

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

20516

Umatilla Subbasin Umbrella

This project provides an overview of all FWP funded projects within the basin and cooridinates of hatchery production, marking, and releases with other projects.

198343500

Operate and Maintain Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities

Umatilla production of chinook and steelhead is transferred to acclimate facilities prior to release in the Umatilla Basin. Broodstock is collected, held and spawned to provide eggs to Umatilla and other basin hatcheries for fish productionng.

198902401

Evaluate Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Umatilla River.

Determine migration patterns, migrant abundance, and survival of hatchery and natural juvenile salmonids in the Umatilla basin using PIT tag and radio telemetry technology and investigate effects of environmental variables on fish migration.

199000500

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation

Evaluate juvenile rearing, marking, tagging, survival, stock life history, fish health, mass marking, straying, sport fishing and catch contribution for salmon and steelhead reared in oxygen supplemented and standard raceways at Umatilla Hatchery


199000501

Umatilla and Walla Walla Basin Natural Production M&E Project

Monitor and evaluate natural spawning, rearing, migration, survival, life histories, age and growth characteristics, and genetic characteristics of adult salmon and steelhead and their natural progeny in the Umatilla River Basins.

198802200

Trap and Haul in the Umatilla and Walla Walla Basins

Increase survival of migrating juvenile and adult salmon and summer steelhead in the Umatilla Basin by operating passage facilities, flow enhancement measures, trap facilities, and transport equipment to provide adequate passage conditions.

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

The Umatilla Hatchery is an integral part to achieve the artificial production objectives outlined in the draft Umatilla Subbasin Summary (Saul et al. 2001), Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), Columbia Basin System Planning – Umatilla River Subbasin Plan (NWPPC 1990), and A Comprehensive Plan for Rehabilitation of Anadromous Fish Stocks in the Umatilla River Basin (Boyce 1986).

The hatchery is operated by ODFW and co-managed with CTUIR under policies and procedures outlined by Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT 1995) and in terms and conditions outlined in the NMFS Hatchery Biological Opinion. A portion of the M&E is Fish Health services that fulfill requirements agreed upon in IHOT policies and procedures. The hatchery M&E fulfills requirements identified as terms and conditions in the NMFS Hatchery Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), and the Hatchery Genetic Management Plan (HGMP) (Saul et al. 2001).

Production at the Umatilla Hatchery currently includes 150,000 summer steelhead smolts, 360,000 spring chinook, and 600,000 sub yearling fall chinook salmon. A number of out of basin hatchery facilities, Bonneville Hatchery produces yearling fall chinook, Little White Salmon Hatchery produces spring chinook, and Cascade Hatchery and Lower Herman Creek Ponds produce coho salmon, also produce fish for the program to meet artificial propagation objectives outline in the Umatilla Subbasin Summery (Saul et al 2001) and the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The adult return goals outlined in the Subbassin summary (Saul et al 2001) include:



  1. Reestablish and maintain an average run of 8,000 spring chinook to the Umatilla River mouth by the year 2010.

  2. Reestablish and maintain an average run of 12,000 fall chinook to the Umatilla River mouth by the year 2020..

Achieve and maintain an average run of 5,500 summer steelhead to the Umatilla River mouth by the year 2010.
The artificial propagation program for the basin also includes juvenile acclimation and adult holding and spawning satellite facilities. These facilities are all operated by the CTUIR under the Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance project. There are five acclimation facilities in the basin; Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow, and Pendleton. The first acclimation facility (Bonifer) was constructed and began operations in 1983. With the completion of the Pendleton facility in 2000, all juvenile salmon and steelhead released into the basin are now acclimated.

There are also three adult facilities associated with the Fish Restoration Program. Summer steelhead are held and spawned at Minthorn, fall chinook at Three Mile Dam, and spring chinook at South Fork Walla Walla. Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. Broodstock for these facilities are collected and transported from the Three Mile Dam Adult Trapping and Handling Complex by the Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations project.


Review Comments:

No comments.


Budget:

FY02

FY03


FY04

917,559

Category: High Priority



944,335

Category: High Priority



971,915

Category: High Priority





Project: 199000500 – Umatilla Fish Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation
Sponsor: ODFW
Short Description:

Evaluate juvenile rearing, adult survival, stock life history, straying, fish health and sport fishing and catch contribution for salmon and steelhead reared in oxygen supplemented and standard raceways at Umatilla Hatchery.

Abbreviated Abstract:

The Umatilla Fish Hatchery is an important component in the effort to reintroduce chinook salmon, supplement summer steelhead and enhance fisheries in the Umatilla River. The Umatilla Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were first presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a key adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. The Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation project started in 1991. Past hatchery monitoring and evaluation focused on comparison of the effectiveness and efficiency of producing fish in standard Oregon and oxygen-supplemented Michigan raceways, rearing density effects on the performance of subyearling fall chinook and summer steelhead reared in Michigan raceways, and comparisons of yearling spring chinook reared at Umatilla, Bonneville, Little White Salmon, and Carson hatcheries. The data analyses and reporting for many of the original Umatilla Hatchery evaluations are being completed, allowing for the development of new monitoring and evaluations to address uncertainties identified in the 2001 Umatilla Subbasin Summary. The new objectives and tasks included in this proposal were not identified in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990), but were developed to address current uncertainties and data gaps to achieve management objectives, identified in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (Saul et al. 2001). New objectives in this proposal include monitoring and evaluation of: 1) subyearling fall chinook size, release and acclimation strategies to improve SAR, and straying into the Snake River fall chinook ESU; 2) a yearling spring chinook over-winter rearing strategy to better mimic a natural thermal regime which is lacking at the well-water supplied Umatilla Hatchery; and 3) lower river release strategies to increase SAR of summer steelhead.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

20516

Umatilla Subbasin

Umatilla Subbasin Umbrella

8903500

Umatilla Hatchery O&M

Rearing facility for yearling spring chinook, subyearling fall chinook and summer steelhead released into the Umatilla River.

8343500

Umatilla Hatchery Satelite Facilities O&M

The satelite facilities are used for acclimation and releases of Umatilla Hatchery production, and brood stock collection for the chinook and steelhead production programs.

8902401

Umatilla River Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival M&E

The Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival M&E project operates and maintains the PIT-tag interogation station at West Extension Facility. The Hatchery M&E project relies on PIT-tag detection for hatchery smolt survival estimates.

9000501

Umatilla River Natural Production M&E

The Umatilla River Natural Production M&E provides estimates of the Umatilla Hatchery produced fish that spawn and contribute to natural production in the Umatilla River.



Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

Hatchery M&E Relationship to Umatilla Subbasin Summary

The Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation project provides information for culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement that support the effort to attain anadromous adult return and fishery objectives outlined in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (Saul et al. 2001) and Table 1.


Table 1. Umatilla River Production Objectives and Fish Disposition (Taken from 2001 Umatilla Subbasin

Summary, Saul et al. 2001)



Species


Returned to Umatilla Mouth

Disposition of Returns

Natural

Hatchery

Total

Escape-

ment


Brood-stock

Harvest

Total

Spring Chinook

2,000

6,000

8,000

3,000

1,000


4,000

8,000

Fall Chinook

6,000

6,000

12,000

6,000

1,0001

5,000

12,000

Coho

Undetermined

6,000

6,000

To be determined

Steelhead

4,000

1,500

5,500

4,000

116

1384

5,500

The 2001 Umatilla Subbasin Summary outlines four general management goals that relate to fish species in the basin:



  1. Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of summer steelhead, bull trout, shellfish and other indigenous fish in the Umatilla Basin
  2. Reestablish runs of extirpated spring chinook, fall chinook, coho salmon and Pacific lamprey into the Umatilla River Basin.


  3. Provide sustainable ceremonial, subsistence, and recreational fisheries and non-consumptive fish benefits such as cultural and ecological values.

  4. Maintain genetic and other biological characteristics of indigenous populations and genetic viability of reintroduced populations.

The Umatilla Subbasin Summary (Saul et al. 2001) contains strategies and action items needed to attain the above fish related goals. Table 2. presents Umatilla Hatchery M&E proposed objectives and tasks related to strategies and actions identified in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary. The managers identified low smolt to adult returns (SAR) as a primary factor impeding achievement of natural production, broodstock and harvest objectives. Specifically, hatchery production SARs are far below the target levels outlined in the Umatilla Master Hatchery Plan (CTUIR and ODFW, 1990). Specific Umatilla Hatchery M&E objectives (Section F of this proposal) developed to address the low SARs are: fall chinook, objectives 1, 4, 5 and 6, 12 and 13; Spring chinook, objectives 2, 7, 8 and 12 and 13, and summer steelhead, objectives 3, 12 and 13.


Table 2. The relationship between the Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation project objectives and strategies and actions identified in the 2001 Umatilla Subbasin Summary (Saul et al.2001)

Strategy and Action Items Identified in the 2001 Umatilla Subbasin Summary

Proposed Umatilla Hatchery M&E Objectives

Strategy 6. Continue to supplement the recently reintroduced spring chinook population with a hatchery program consisting of Carson stock to provide natural production and harvest.

Action 6.1

Continue releasing 710,000 spring chinook smolts from acclimation facilities into historic spring chinook habitat in the upper Umatilla River Basin to achieve a portion of spring chinook objectives.


Action 6.2

Release an additional 515,000 spring chinook smolts from acclimation facilities into historic spring chinook habitat in the upper Umatilla River Basin to achieve the remainder of the spring chinook objectives.



Obj. 2, task a. and b.

Obj. 7, task a and b.

Obj. 8, task a.-c.

Obj. 9, task a.

Obj.12, task a.-d.


Obj. 2, task a. and b.

Obj. 7, task a and b.

Obj. 8, task a.-c.

Obj. 9, task a.

Obj.12, task a.-d.


Strategy 7. Continue to supplement the recently reintroduced fall chinook population with a hatchery program consisting of upriver bright stock obtained from returns to the Umatilla River and/or returns to Priest Rapids Hatchery.
Action 7.1

Continue the interim program of releasing 480,000 age 1+ and 600,000 age 0+ fall chinook smolts from acclimation facilities into historic fall chinook habitat in the mid Umatilla River Basin.

Action 7.2

Assess monitoring and evaluation results to determine appropriate program changes to achieve objectives.


Obj. 1, task a and b.

Obj. 4, task a. and b.

Obj. 5, task a and b.

Obj. 6, task a and b.

Obj.12, task a.-d.


Obj.9, task a.

Obj.10, task a.

Obj.11, task a.


Strategy 9. Supplement the indigenous summer steelhead population with a hatchery program consisting of local broodstock to enhance natural production and provide harvest opportunities.
Action 9.1

Continue releasing 150,000 steelhead smolts from acclimation facilities into historic steelhead habitat in the mid-to-upper Umatilla River Basin.


Action 9.2

Design and implement a comprehensive study to assess whether supplementation activities in the subbasin have been effective in rebuilding natural steelhead while maintaining their genetic structure and long-term viability.



Obj. 3, task a and b.

Obj. 9, task a, b and c.

Obj. 10, task a.

Obj. 11, task a.


Strategy 12. Implement artificial propagation practices to maintain genetic and biological integrity of supplemented stocks.

Action 12.2

When fish health and disease issues are identified, take appropriate remedial actions to maximize survival of affected fish and prevent spread to other natural and hatchery fish.


Obj. 12 task a.-d.

Obj. 13 task a.



Strategy 13. Monitor and evaluate Umatilla hatchery programs to ensure they are successful and minimize adverse effects on listed or other indigenous species.
Actions 13.1-13.9 comprise the same M&E objectives contained in section F. of this proposal

Objectives 1-13, all tasks.


Hatchery M&E Relationship with NMFS Biological Opinion

The proposed objectives of the Umatilla Hatchery M&E project relate to “Reform Existing Hatcheries and Artificial Production Programs” in the 2000 National Marine Fisheries Service Biological Opinion. Specifically, Actions 107, 169, 174 and 182.


BiOp Action 107

Smolt-to-adult survival estimates are a large component of the Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation projects. Our subyearling fall chinook program is currently in a scaled-down, evaluation mode, prompted by low SAS and high straying rates. The low SAS and high straying rates are being addressed through tests of lower versus upper river release strategies and acclimation strategies. We currently wire-tag 100% of the fall chinook production at Umatilla Hatchery. The wire tags trip traps at Lower Granite Dam, reducing the number of fall chinook strays that escape into the Snake River fall chinook ESU.


BiOp Action 169

Results from the Umatilla Hatchery M&E project have been used to develop the hatchery and genetic management plan (HGMP) for the mid-Columbia steelhead ESU in the Umatilla River.

BiOp Action 174

Umatilla Hatchery produced spring chinook have strayed into the Tucannon River, Washington. One hundred percent of the spring chinook salmon produced at Umatilla Hatchery will have a production mark. This will also allow better estimates of non CWT’d hatchery fish that spawn and contribute to natural production in the Umatilla River.

BiOp Action 182

Endemic Umatilla River stock is reared at the Umatilla Hatchery to supplement steelhead in the Umatilla River. The large number of coded-wire-tagged steelhead will allow better estimates of naturally spawning hatchery steelhead in the Umatilla River.


Umatilla Hatchery M&E Relationship with NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program Objectives

The proposed objectives of the Umatilla Hatchery M&E project relate to Sections 4 “Artificial Production Strategies”, and 9 “Research Monitoring and Evaluation” objectives in the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specifically, relating to section 4; results from the Umatilla Hatchery M&E are used to guide the development of the Umatilla Hatchery Annual Operations Plan (AOP). Table 3. presents recommendations from the Umatilla Hatchery M&E project, and subsequent changes in hatchery operation, release strategies and acclimation in the program. All fish reared in Umatilla Hatchery are progeny of broods spawned under IHOT (1995) guidelines. The Umatilla Hatchery M&E project includes creel surveys of the anadromous fisheries on the Umatilla River. The Creel surveys provide information to the managers regarding harvest of hatchery and wild mid-Columbia ESU steelhead, section 5, 2000 FWP.


Review Comments:

No comments.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

626,178

Category: High Priority


631,381

Category: High Priority


572,848

Category: High Priority





Project: 199000501 – Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project
Sponsor: CTUIR
Short Description:

Monitor and evaluate natural spawning, rearing, migration, survival, age and growth characteristics and life histories of adult salmon, steelhead, bull trout and mountain whitefish, and their naturally produced progeny in the Umatilla River Basin.

Abbreviated Abstract:

Our project goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. This is the only project that monitors the restoration of naturally producing salmon and steelhead in the basin. The project objectives are to measure, estimate and report salmonid spawning success, rearing densities and abundance, habitat quality and quantity, production capacity of the basin, life history characteristics, and migration timing and success. This project also monitors tribal harvest (roving creel and telephone surveys) and water temperatures (Ryan and Vemco thermographs) in coordination with ODFW, USFS and other CTUIR projects.

Researchers and managers from throughout the basin examine and modify this project during monthly and annual coordination meetings. We strive to provide the best information for adaptive management of local salmon and steelhead. The information generated by this project also has utility for salmonid restoration efforts throughout the Columbia River Basin.

While certain monitoring activities are conducted each year, others objectives are already completed or were deferred to future years through prioritization, need, and limitations in personnel and funding. Adult passage facility evaluations, physical habitat surveys and genetic monitoring are examples of this. Currens and Schreck (1993, 1995) developed a genetic baseline for endemic steelhead in the Umatilla Basin from samples collected in 1992 and 1994 (allozyme and mtDNA). Genetic characteristics will be examined again FY 2005. Geneticists under contract will use both electrophoresis and DNA techniques to examine the null hypothesis that current artificial propagation of endemic steelhead has not compromised population’s genetic characteristics. The Management Oversight Committee will likely request genetic monitoring again in 2015.


We communicate findings to researchers and managers through formal reports, monthly oversight committee meetings, annual basin operation meetings, and formal presentations at various conferences and forums. This project is developing a web site where raw data, summarized data, reports, analyses and findings will be available on line.
Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship




Develop Progeny Marker for Salmonids to Evaluate Supplementation

After the Progeny Marker Project develops and tests the mark, our M&E project will use it to evaluate the reproductive success of hatchery reared endemic steelhead allowed to spawn naturally in the Umatilla Basin (beginning in 2005).

9000500

Umatilla Hatchery M&E

Our M&E project coordinates monitoring throughout the basin with the Hatchery M&E program. Our M&E project collects coded wire tags form hatchery reared adults found during spawning surveys. Tag recoveries are critical to the Hatchery M&E programs.

8902401

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival

Our M&E project relies on the Outmigration project to maintain the PIT tag detector at Three Mile Dam, to detect the natural smolts we tag, to estimate detector efficiency rates, and to augment our tagging of naturally produced smolts.

8805302


Design and Consturct Umatilla Hatchery, Supplement

The hatchery supplement will increase hatchery adults spawning in the wild with increases in returning adults. Our M&E project monitors these spawners and their progeny as well as residualism rates of hatchery smolts.

8373600

Umatilla Passage Facility Operations and Maintenance

Our project measures the success of this project indirectly in terms of increased natural production.

8902700

Power Repay Operations and Maintenance of USBR CRP Project




8343500

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Operation and Maintenance

The acclimation facilities release hatchery reared smolts to increase natural production through returning adult spawners. Our M&E project monitors these spawners and their progeny as well as residualism rates of hatchery smolts.

8802200

Umatilla Fish Passage Operations

Passage Operations provides quality adult return data for our M&E project to estimate adult return rates. Passage Operations also coordinates water storage releases that benefit hatchery and natural smolt and adult migrations.

9506000

Lamprey Restoration

We provide the Lamprey Project with any information we collected on juvenile and adult lamprey while completed project tasks.


9008000

PIT Tag Information System

We depend on the PIT tag system to coordinate and store PIT tag data and interrogate and detect our PIT tagged smolts throughout the Columbia Basin.

8710001

Umatilla Fish Habitat Enhancement

Our M&E project monitors salmonids and habitat features within and adjacent to habitat enhancement projects.

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

This project is the measuring tool of natural production restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin as outlined in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (section 3.1B, 1994). The Umatilla Basin fisheries restoration program is a direct result of planning and restoration efforts of CTUIR (1984), ODFW (1986), BPA (1994) and NPPC (1990). We provide detailed information regarding the natural spawning, rearing and migration success of spring chinook salmon, fall chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. This project’s fundamental purpose is to measure the success of the salmon and steelhead restoration efforts and provide information for adaptive management. Information we provide also has utility for restoration efforts throughout the Columbia River Basin.


Review Comments:

No comments.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04


280,716

Category: High Priority



300,000

Category: High Priority



310,000

Category: High Priority




Project: 199402600 – Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration
Sponsor: CTUIR
Short Description:

Implement and monitor Pacific lamprey restoration plan developed for the Umatilla River. Assess ability of Pacific lampreys to detect migratory pheromone emitted by larvae, test for genetic differences.


Abbreviated Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to provide the critical information to restore Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata in the Umatilla River that is called for in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary. This information is essential for restoration of lampreys and to provide tribal members opportunities to practice cultural use and provide ecosystem function. Pacific lampreys are vital components of intact ecosystems that have been affected directly and indirectly by dams, habitat deterioration, and possibly food web shifts in the ocean. The project has objectives: (1) increase larval abundance in the Umatilla River, (2) determine reproductive success of adult lamprey outplants, (3) estimate the numbers of adult lampreys entering the Umatilla River, (4) monitor larval population trends in the Umatilla River, (5) estimate the numbers of recently metamorphosed lampreys migrating out of the Umatilla River, (6) Evaluate the potential role of bile salts released by larval lampreys as a migratory cue to upstream migrating Pacific lampreys, and (7) Describe genetic differences among Pacific lampreys.


Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #


Title/description

Nature of relationship

871001

Umatilla Fish Habitat Enhancement

habitat improvements in Umatilla

8802200

Umatilla Fish passage Operations

water in river is good for lampreys

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

This project is essential to evaluate recovery efforts for Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River. The project addresses the needs outlined in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary and the provisions of the Fish and Wild Program. The Umatilla Subbasin Summary calls for strategies to “Develop and implement a Pacific lamprey restoration plan for the Umatilla Basin.” Our first objective addresses Action 10.1, which is to “Continue outplanting of adults as detailed in the Umatilla River Basin Pacific Lamprey Restoration plan (CTUIR 1999). Our second objective addresses Action 10.2, which is to “Determine reproductive success of adult outplants. Our third, fourth, and fifth objectives addresses Action 10.3, which is to “Monitor for increases in larval abundance, juvenile outmigration, and adult returns.” Our sixth objective is not mentioned in the subbasin summary, however CTUIR needs this research to better understand the lampreys ability to detect pheromones, which may be very important for management and restoration in the Umatilla Basin. Our seventh objective addresses Action 10.5, which is to “Continue genetic assessment of lamprey populations among and within the Umatilla and selected Columbia River subbasins.”

Pacific lampreys are also covered under Section III.C.2.a).1. of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This states “Obtain the information necessary to begin restoring the characteristics of healthy lamprey populations.”

Pacific lampreys are again covered in the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000), section 7.3 ‘Tribal Actions’ state, 1) Halt the decline of salmon, lamprey, and sturgeon populations above Bonneville Dam within 7 years, and 2) Increase lamprey and sturgeon to naturally sustaining levels within 25 years in a manner that supports Tribal harvest.

Review Comments:

No comments.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

520,464

Category: High Priority



500,000

Category: High Priority



510,000

Category: High Priority




Project: 199506001 – Protect and Enhance Wildlife Habitat in Squaw Creek Watershed
Sponsor: CTUIR
Short Description:

Protect and enhance watershed resources to provide benefits for eight HEP Target Species and anadromous and resident salmonids.

Abbreviated Abstract:

Protection and enhancement of habitats within Squaw Creek Watershed provide dual benefits for fish and wildlife by 1) providing perpetual protection of watershed resources, 2) enhancing habitats to provide partial mitigation for McNary and John Day Hydroelectric Power Projects impacts, and 3) improving natural salmonid habitat and production. Habitats within the 24,200 acre Squaw Creek subbasin provide approximately 3,832 Habitat Units of protection credit for eight target mitigation species, including the western meadowlark, downy woodpecker, black capped-chickadee, blue grouse, mule deer, yellow warbler, mink, and great blue heron. Squaw Creek provides 23 miles of anadromous and resident fish habitat and is critical to natural production of Threatened summer steelhead in the Umatilla Basin. In 1992 approximately 25% of summer steelhead spawning in index areas of the Umatilla Basin spawned in Squaw Creek. Other salmonids benefiting from perpetual habitat protection and enhancement include Threatened bull trout, redband trout, and re-introduced spring chinook and coho salmon. Project objectives include; 1) continue operations and maintenance to provide 3,832 Habitat Units of wildlife habitat protection credit, 2) implement enhancements to contribute towards the provision of 5,554 enhancement credits. Operations and Maintenance objectives will be achieved by 1) leasing and resting 20,000 acres of BIA-administered grazing allotments, 2) allotment fence maintenance, 3) noxious weed control, and 4) access and travel management. Enhancement objectives will be achieved by; 1) obliterating 6 miles of road, 2) continuing implementation of a co-operative project with the Environmental Protection Agency to add large woody debris to Squaw Creek, 3) continuing conifer, hardwood, and shrub plantings in riparian and floodplain habitats, and 4) collecting/propagating native plant material for out-year restoration projects. Monitoring and evaluation elements in FY02 will focus on the large wood addition project.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

8710001

Umatilla Basin Habitat Enhancement

Project incorporates Squaw Creek Watersjed due to its critical contribution of summer steelhead spawning/rearing habitat to the Umatilla Basin. Opportunities exist to share personnel, vehicles, and equipment to minimize project expense.

9000501

Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation.

Fish habitat monitoring and evaluation surveys for the Squaw Creek Watershed will be conducted under this project, and will help quantify benefits of activities accomplished under this proposal.


Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

Rationale for this proposal are provided in the part by the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (Saul, D.; Craig, R; and A. Davidson. 2000), which identifies fish and wildlife habitat limiting factors, goals, objectives, strategies, and needs. Additional project rationale are provided in the principals of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program. Appropriate Subbasin Summary information will be presented first, followed by applicable Fish and Wildlife Program principals.





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