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1/ Section 9.6.2.1, Page 9-133.

Table 3. Project Objectives Relative to Addressing Goals, Objectives, Strategies, and/or Actions Described in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (2001)Fish Goals




Project Objective 1

Improve Fish Passage

Project Objective 2

Restore Channel Habitat

Project Objective 3

Restore Riparian Habitat

  • Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of summer steelhead, bull trout, shellfish, and other indigenous species.

  • Reestablish runs of extirpated spring chinook, fall chinook, coho salmon, and Pacific lamprey.

  • Provide sustainable ceremonial, subsistence, and recreational fisheries and non-consumptive benefits such as cultural and ecological values

YES

YES

YES

Fish Objectives


  • Reestablish and maintain an average run size of spring chinook @ 8000 by 2010.

  • Reestablish and maintain an average run size of fall chinook @ 12,000 by 2020.
  • Reestablish and maintain an average run size of coho @ 6000 by 2010.


  • Achieve and maintain an average run size of summer steelhead @ 5500 by 2010.

  • Achieve and maintain an self-sustaining populations and fisheries of Pacific lamprey, bull trout and other indigenous fishes by 2010.

YES

YES

YES






Project Objective 1

Improve Fish Passage

Project Objective 2

Restore Channel Habitat

Project Objective 3

Restore Riparian Habitat

Fish Strategies & Associated Actions











Strategy 2: Protect, enhance or restore water quality to improve the survival, abundance and distribution of indigenous resident & anadromous fishes

  • Action 2.1: Reduce stream temperatures by restoring or enhancing riparian vegetation, floodplain function, and increasing hyporehic and instream flows.

  • Action 2.9: Monitor & evaluate efforts to improve water quality and utilize data to assist in management decisions.

YES


YES

YES

Strategy 3: Protect, enhance, or restore instream and riparian habitat to improve the survival, abundance and distribution of indigenous & anadromous fishes

  • Action 3.2: In short-term, plant native vegetation, construct pools and large woody debris in streams to provide adequate pools and cover for fish. Maintain O&M of projects in place.

  • Action 3.3: Over long-term, implement improvements to stream geomorphic features (sinuosity, width/dept ratio, pool frequency, depth and dimensions, entrenchment, etc.) that will result in benefits to fish habitat quantity and quality.

  • Action 3.4: Over the long term, restore riparian vegetation and adjacent valley bottom and upland vegetation to result in natural recruitment of large woody debris into streams.

  • Action 3.8: Improve floodplain function to improve stream channel stability, hyporehic flows and instream habitat diversity.

  • Action 3.11: Monitory and evaluate efforts to protect, enhance and restore instream and riparian habitats.

YES

YES

YES

Strategy 5: Improve fish passage conditions at all human-made passage impediments for resident and anadromous upstream and downstream migrants
  • Action 5.2: Modify or remove culverts, bridges, grade controls and water diversion structures as necessary to improve fish passage.


  • Action 5.4: Monitor river conditions and operations of passage facilities to ensure that adequate passage exists and implement adjustments as necessary to ensure efficient passage.

YES







Strategy 14: Monitor and evaluate the productivity, abundance, distri-bution, life history and biological characteristics of anadromous and resident fish and relationship with instream and riparian habitat con-ditions within the Umatilla River Basin to assess the success of management strategies

  • Action 14.2: Conduct redd and carcass surveys to monitor adult salmonid spawning escapement.

  • Action 14.5: Conduct biological surveys to monitor and evaluate anadromous and resident fish distribution, abundance, condi-tion, habitat use, life history, etc.

  • Action 14.7: Measure the quantity and quality of fish habitat in the basin.




YES

YES

Table 4. Known Fish Passage Barriers below McKay (A. Sexton, CTUIR, personal communication, February, 2001)

STREAM

RIVER MILE

BARRIER TYPE


COMPOSI-TION

STEP HEIGHT (m)

DEGREE

RECOM-MENDED ACTION

Umatilla River

1.5

Channel Modification

Concrete

0.7

Partial

Modify

Umatilla River

2.4

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.0

Partial

Modify

Umatilla River

28.8

Feed Canal Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.5

Partial

Modify / Remove

Umatilla River

49.0

Vacated Irrigation Dam

Unknown

1.2

Unknown

Remove

Jungle/ Windy Spring

0.1


Culvert

Steel

0.15

Partial

Modify

McKay Creek

6.0

Earthen Dam

Earth/ Concrete

40

Complete

Leave

Butter Creek

7.9

Flash Boards

Wood

2.3

Complete

Modify

Butter Creek

27.2

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.4

Complete

Modify

Butter Creek

43.0

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.2

Complete

Modify

Johnson Creek Tributary of Butter Creek

0.3

Culvert

Wood

0.8


Partial

Modify

Stewart Creek

0.6

Bridge

Concrete

0.4

Partial

Modify

Birch Creek

0.5

Pipe Casing

Concrete

1.4

Partial

Modify

Birch Creek

5.0

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.2

Partial

Modify/ Remove

Birch Creek

10.0

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.0

Partial

Modify

Birch Creek

15.0

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.0

Partial

Remove/ Modify

W. Birch Creek


3.8

Bridge

Concrete

1.2

Partial

Modify

W. Birch Creek

3.5

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

2.1

Partial

Modify

W. Birch Creek

5.5

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

1.4

Partial

Modify

W. Birch Creek

8.5

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

Unknown

Partial

Modify/ Remove

W. Birch Creek

9.0

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

Unknown

Partial

Modify/ Remove

W. Birch Creek

?

Culvert

Steel

Unknown


Unknown

Unknown

E. Birch Creek

9.0

Irrigation Dam

Concrete

0.8

Partial

Modify/ Remove

Stewart Creek

0.6

Bridge

Concrete

0.4

Partial

Modify

This is a new table supplement that will be included in a revised Umatilla Sub-Basin Summary (2001) (pers. com. Gary James, CTUIR).


Review Comments:

This project addresses NMFS RPA (will be provided during Committee reviews). This project would address current passage problems for all species.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

203,020

Category: High Priority



1,044,080

Category: High Priority



40,000

Category: High Priority



Project: 25047 – Morrow County Buffer Initiative
Sponsor: Morrow SWCD
Short Description:

Implements ripairan buffer program using cost share provided by USDA, State of Oregon, and private landowners.


Abbreviated Abstract:

Morrow SWCD provides local leadership in implementing several projects focused on improving watershed health. Working in close partnership with NRCS, Morrow SWCD provides a framework for a team that has the ability to develop and implement scientifically sound and economically feasible resource management plans for private landowners. This partnership also helps satisfy the four essential elements of the Oregon Plan in the areas of 1) coordination of effort by all parties, 2) development of action plans with relevance and ownership at the local level, 3) monitoring progress, and 4) making appropriate corrective changes in the future.]

Morrow SWCD proposes to implement riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia and address limiting factors identified in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary, March 2, 2001; and the John Day Subbasin Summary, March 2, 2001. This project will dedicate 1.0 FTE to provide program outreach and promotion of the programs along with the technical planning support needed to implement at least 40 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 1000 acres covering an estimated 50 miles of streams in Morrow County. Additionally, this person will provide input and assistance to the subbasin assessment and planning process.

Buffer widths will vary from 35 to 180 feet on each side of the stream. Implementation will include prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs will be borne by existing USDA and state of Oregon programs: Continuous Conservation Reserve Program (CCRP) and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP). Leases will be for 10 to 15 year periods. These programs provide a critical opportunity for the protection of streams that have little to no riparian area protection. Lack of staffing to conduct assessments, develop and follow-up on plans has resulted in a significant drop in program participation and even the cancellation of some contracts. Contracts for CCRP buffers dropped from the development of 7 contracts in FY1999 to 1 so far in FY2001. There have been no contracts developed for the 31 miles of the Morrow County portion of Rock Creek. Rock Creek is designated as an anadromous fish stream. Landowners have shown interest in participating in the buffer programs, but with the lack of staff that can concentrate their efforts on buffers, this interest has diminished.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship




B.O. RPA 153

This proposal focuses on accelerating the protection of riparian areas on private lands by utilizating the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program.




B.O. RPA 154

Through this proposal staff assistance will be provided to the Subbasin Assessment and Planning process to coordinate local input and needs.


Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

This project to develop and implement CCRP/CREP buffer plans supports the Morrow SWCD action plan, action Item #IVb – ‘Help landowners address wildlife habitat needs through the promotion and use of buffers through various programs such as CCRP and CREP. CCRP or CREP buffer plans will also address some of the needs and limiting factors of the John Day and Umatilla Subbasin Summaries. Some of the needs include improved riparian habitat, reduced sediment input, and decreased stream temperature.

Buffers remove sediment and nutrients, stabilize stream banks, improve fish habitat, and provide food sources, nesting cover and shelter for wildlife. More details on buffers and their effects can be found in a fact sheet on the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) web site: www.ctic.purdue.edu/Core4/news/annc/Bufferfact.html or at the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) web site.

The Oregon Plan calls for “community based actions” to conserve and restore habitat facilitated by “government coordination: to provide consistent and effective programs. For habitat, the Oregon Plan emphasizes the need to protect and restore riparian areas. Implementation of the CREP has been a major objective of the State of Oregon and is an emphasis of this proposal.

The 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) biological opinion identifies three reasonable and prudent alternatives (RPAs) addressed by this proposal. RPA 152 requests the action agencies to coordinate their efforts and support for offsite habitat enhancement measures undertaken by other Federal agencies, states, Tribes and local governments. RPA 153 specifically requests BPA to work with agricultural incentive programs such as the CREP to protect 100 miles of riparian buffers per year. This project will implement riparian buffers on at least 50 miles of streams. Also, this project will address RPA 154 by providing input to the development and updating of subbasin assessments and plans.

This project to implement buffer systems supports the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Goal, Policies and Objectives described in Section 7.6, particularly 7.6B1 helping private parties be proactive, 7.6B3integration of habitat work in broader watershed improvement efforts. Section 7.6B4 provides for higher priority for actions that maximize effect for the dollar, given this proposal seeks only funding to make technical assistance available, with other entities picking up the implementation and lease costs, it shows outstanding leverage of funds. The project supports the provisions of 7.6C for Coordinated Habitat Planning. Establishment of riparian buffers clearly supports actions identified in section 7.6D to reduce sediment, improve bank stability, and water quality. Tree establishment in riparian buffers will help stabilize banks, and provide shade that will help reduce heating rates on hot summer days. Direct planning with private landowners supports the concepts discussed in Section 7.7.

The Tribes’Anadromous Fish Restoration Plan, Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit, page 35 identifies 7 actions of which 2 are directly addressed by establishing riparian buffers: Action 6 - Protect and enhance aquatic and riparian habitat; Action 9 – Increase stream bank cover, decrease water temperatures during the summer and increase stream flow.

Review Comments:

If there is a permanent or long-term easement, this proposal will address NMFS RPA 152 . Although money exists in the State of Oregon CREP program, the SWCD is statutorily unable to use the existing money. Managers question the appropriateness of allocating F&W Program money to administer (i.e., fund FTE) USDA projects. This project needs to be implemented consistent with limiting factors and problem locations identified in subbasin summaries and eventually subbasin planning to insure fisheries benefits to target species. There needs to be oversight by the COTR to insure that actions taken will benefit fish and wildlife.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

75,086

Category: High Priority



77,337

Category: High Priority



79,657

Category: High Priority




Project: 25055 – Echo Meadows Artificial Recharge Extended Groundwater and Surface Water Modeling
Sponsor: PNNL
Short Description:

Assess impacts of artificial recharge design on stream temperature, effluent chemistry, and pulse duration. This project is designed to establish tools and protocols that can be ported to additional candidate sites.

Abbreviated Abstract:

An increase of thermal gradient in a river where juvenile salmon are hatched can have a significant detrimental effect on salmon survival and the number of salmon that return to the tributary to spawn. One potential mechanism to resolve increased temperature in the tributary stream is through an increase of groundwater recharge to the tributary. Groundwater temperature is not subject to the seasonal temperature fluctuations observed in surface streams and is often constant year around at about 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The Echo Meadows site, Oregon, which is adjacent to the Umatilla River, is currently funded by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC, ProjectID 22010) to perform a pilot test to induce a groundwater pulse to the Umatilla River during summer, at low flow, by means of artificial recharge. The current proposal is a supplement to the existing project to extend the surveillance and modeling effort. The current effort encompasses modeling the pulse and timing the arrival time at the river and actually flooding the Echo Meadows site to initiate the pulse. The pulse is then tracked by measurements at monitoring wells and the plume is observed at the groundwater/surface water interface by thermal imaging the river. This proposal is intended to include consideration of land use for potential mobilization of contamination (nitrates, salts, phosphates) and thermal regime in the subsurface. This will be achieved using a numerical model to predict contaminant release and transport as well as thermal gradients. A surface water model will also be used to predict chemical and thermal mixing in the river adjacent and down gradient from the groundwater pulse discharge zone. Staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will perform model conceptualization, design, implementation, and analysis.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

22010

Echo Meadow Project - Winter Artificial Recharge to Cool Rivers

IRZ will supply data to PNNL from which models will be designed, and calibrated.

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

In the “Draft Umatilla Subbasin Summary”(NPPC, 2001), under “Umatilla Subbasin Summary, Temperature”, there is a section that recognizes temperature effects during the summer months have an adverse affect on juvenile salmon development. This proposal is directed at assessment of improvement of temperature gradients in the stream as well as assessment of potential degradation of water quality associated with high recharge activities.

The Washington Department of Ecology and Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (Oregon DEQ, 2000) have also acknowledges thermal pollution (Total Maximum Daily Load, TMDL) as a detrimental factor affecting tributaries used by spawning salmon. In the report by Stohrs and Leskie (WDOE, 2000), the potential benefits that groundwater has on cooling the stream are noted. Lower temperatures from groundwater have been linked with a reduction in predation of juvenile salmon (McMicheals et. al., 1999) and also provide a better environment during incubation by increasing oxygen and nutrient flow through the stream sediments. In addition to state agencies, tribal governments have also recognized the problems of temperature variation on salmon recovery efforts.

The potential benefits of “banking” excess surface water as groundwater for use during greatest need possess the best possible means of reducing stream temperature at a relatively low cost. The first step in siting any recharge basin must begin with an assessment of the hydrogeologic properties of the site and simulation of performance parameters necessary for basin design.

Review Comments:

The modeling effort should be recommended action but the monitoring of pollutants should be high priority.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

390,283

Category: High Priority (pollutant work)

Recommended Action (modeling effort)


390,283

Category: High Priority (pollutant work)

Recommended Action (modeling effort)


0



Project: 25059 – Develop Progeny Marker for Salmonids to Evaluate Supplementation
Sponsor: CTUIR
Short Description:

A chemical progeny mark would be developed and tested to evaluate natural reproductive success of supplemented steelhead . The mark would be administered to female parents and would be detectable in the otolith of their progeny.

Abbreviated Abstract:

The proposed research would include the development and testing of a progeny mark. A progeny mark is a material or chemical administered to female parents that is detectable in the tissue of their progeny. Ideally, a benign compound (or element such as strontium) would be injected either into the female adult's peritoneum or dorsal sinus and be assimilated into the eggs. The marker would be tested in laboratory conditions at three different concentrations against a control group. The hypothesis is that after the marker is incorporated into the egg, it would be laid down in the otolith of the progeny where it would be detectable using an electron microprobe. A nested ANOVA would be used to test within-female variation and between-treatment variation. This work would be an extension of work done by Kalish (1990) and Rieman et al. (1994) on sockeye salmon to determine if juvenile salmon had an anadromous or resident female parent. Researchers found that the higher strontium concentrations in anadromous sockeye (because of the higher strontium concentrations in the ocean) were passed on to their progeny and were detectable in the center of the progeny’s otoliths. In the development of a progeny mark we would be artificially manipulating marker concentrations in adult females during their upstream migration.

If successful, researchers would now have a tool to evaluate the success of their supplementation programs by determining the natural reproductive success of hatchery fish spawning in the wild in relation to wild spawners. After an effective progeny mark is developed, the new marker would be injected into adult, hatchery, female steelhead collected at traps and weirs (such as the Three Mile Falls Dam Trap on the Umatilla River). The marked adults would be released for natural spawning. The chemical compositions of otolith centers from a sample of naturally produced progeny would indicate the ratios of progeny from marked (hatchery) and unmarked (wild) females.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

8903500

Umatilla Hatchery O&M

The marker will be used as a tool to help evaluate the success of the Umatilla Hatchery program.

198343500

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities O&M

The marker will be used as a tool to help evaluate the success of the Umatilla Hatchery program

9000500

Umatilla Hatchery M&E

The marker will be used as a tool to help evaluate the success of the Umatilla Hatchery program

8802200

Umatilla Fish Passage Operations

The Umatilla River Fish Passage project has facilities necessary to capture and mark hatchery females with the progeny marker as they migrate up river over Three Mile Dam.




Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

9000501

Umatilla Natural Production M&E


The Umatilla Natural Production project will be the primary user of marker when developed and is currently set up to monitor natural production, including sampling outmigrating salmonids.


Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

Until the conception of this proposal, no one has developed a tool that could be used to monitor the natural reproductive success of hatchery fish from endemic broodstock, because the hatchery fish are genetically identical to the wild fish. The development of a progeny marker would allow the evaluation of any supplementation program using endemic broodstock throughout the Pacific Northwest. In this manner, fisheries managers would be able to support the hypothesis that these hatchery supplementation programs are providing fish to rebuild naturally spawning populations, not just providing fish for harvest, as consistent by the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP). This project is also consistent with the 2000 FWP Artificial Production Strategies that states that “artificial production must be implemented within an experimental, adaptive management design that includes an aggressive program to evaluate the risks and benefits and address scientific uncertainties”. This research project would allow the CTUIR to effectively evaluate their supplementation program, and provide a tool for other fish managers to do the same.

This project is also consistent with the Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Strategies listed in the 2000 FWP:


  1. Identify and resolve key uncertainties for the program,

  2. Monitor, evaluate and apply results, and

  3. Make information from this program readily available.

An uncertainty in the CTUIR Artificial Production Project is whether hatchery produced females from endemic broodstock are spawning successfully in the wild. This has been identified as an unknown (section 10.5) in the Draft Umatilla Hatchery Genetics and Management Plan (HGMP) (CTUIR and ODFW, 2000). The development of a progeny marker would allow fish managers to monitor and evaluate this uncertainty. This is consistent with Action 14.4 of the Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Summary (CTUIR et al., 2001), which states the need to “evaluate natural reproductive success of hatchery supplemented steelhead”. After the marker has been developed, this technology will be made available to other supplementation programs for the purpose of monitoring. This information will be made available through BPA, published journal articles and postings on a proposed CTUIR research, monitoring and evaluation website.

The NMFS Biological Opinion (December, 2000) states in section 9.6.5.3.2 that “reproductive success of naturally spawning hatchery fish is a critical uncertainty.” Action 182 states that “the Action Agencies and NMFS shall work within regional priorities and congressional appropriations processes to establish and provide the appropriate level of FCRPS funding for studies to determine the reproductive success of hatchery fish relative to wild fish.” The marker that would be developed under this proposal would provide a tool to be used for this evaluation. This proposal also meets the hatchery effectiveness monitoring required under Action 184 of the NMFS Biological Opinion. As previously stated, the development of progeny marker would allow the CTUIR to effectively monitor the reproductive success of hatchery steelhead. It would also provide a tool to meet the overall research, monitoring, and evaluation needs of artificial propagation throughout the entire Pacific Northwest.

Review Comments:

This project addresses NMFS RPA 184. If this work is successful the technique could be a useful management tool for evaluation programs. Cost share will consist of in-kind from the CTUIR. This project was viewed as having merit since the supplementation project has been ongoing for a number of years. Pending the results, this may be especially valuable due to universal applications.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

149,665

Category: High Priority



152,151

Category: High Priority



198,661

Category: High Priority




Project: 25077 – Umatilla County Conservation Buffer Project
Sponsor: Umatilla - SWCD
Short Description:

Implement buffer program using cost share provided by Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation, USDA, State of Oregon, and private landowners.

Abbreviated Abstract:

The Conservation Partnership in Oregon is a unique coalition of local, tribal, state, and federal groups that mobilizes staff and program funding to help people and communities address natural resource conservation issues. The Partnership, working side by side with

landowners and land users, has made great strides in conserving natural resources since the 1939 Oregon Legislature passed enabling legislation to create Conservation Districts. Guiding this assistance are Conservation District Boards of local leaders who know the people in their communities and who are familiar with conservation needs in the

district. The Conservation Partnership blends individual member resources to offer technical and financial assistance in planning and applying natural resource conservation practices and systems. It also works together in other areas, such as resource inventories,

conservation education, and conservation technology. This is a “tried and true” process that is trusted and relied upon by farmers and ranchers to get conservation on-the-ground.

Umatilla County Soil and Water Conservation District is involved in the implementation of several full-scale watershed enhancement projects and programs on private land. The Umatilla SWCD jurisdiction follows the county boundaries including portions of the Umatilla, Walla Walla and North Fork John Day subbasins. Working in close partnership with NRCS our team's strength is our ability to develop and implement scientifically and economically sound resource management plans for private landowners. Private ownership is predominant in the Umatilla Basin, covering roughly 80 percent of the Basin land area (1,456,000 acres). The US Forest Service manages about 13 percent of the land area while approximately 12 percent (CTUIR, 1999), lies within the boundaries of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Agricultural and rangelands comprise more than 80 percent of the Basin area and the remainder consists of roughly 15 percent forest and 3 percent urban and developed area. The Walla Walla subbasin is predominately private ownership (81.7 %), with (17.2%) US Forest Service, (.6%) BLM and (.01 %) State of Oregon. Agriculture and rangeland cover most of the subbbasin area with the remainder in forest and urban area.


The Umatilla County Conservation Buffer project will install buffer systems throughout the Umatilla Subbasin including tribal lands(CTUIR), Walla Walla and Upper John Day Subbasins. Specific watersheds targeted for this project will include Umatilla River, Walla Walla River, Wildhorse, Tutuilla-Patawa, Birch, Squaw-Buckeroo, Meacham, and McKay. The project will address limiting factors identified in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000 and Walla Walla Subbasin Summary, March 2, 2001. BPA funding will provide 2.0-2.5 FTE technical staff to implement at least 1600 acres of conservation buffers covering an estimated 132 miles and averaging 100 feet in width. One staff person will be housed at the CTUIR and one position at the NRCS Pendleton field office. Implementation will focus on the installation of riparian buffers, filter strips, and wetland enhancement conservation practices. Buffer installations will be installed and maintained using NRCS standards & specifications, and operation and maintenance standards. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs will be borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs (CREP) and the Continuous Conservation Reserve Program (CCRP). Leases will be for 10-15 year periods and provide cost share for implementation. This program meets a critical need in Umatilla & Walla Walla Basin Watershed in particular where existing ODFW riparian lease agreements begin to expire soon. Current lack of staffing to market the buffer program, conduct assessments and develop plans has created a growing backlog of potential projects. Ten participants are signed up, awaiting assessment and plan development. Landowners on 40 additional reaches have expressed interest in entering into long term buffer contracts. The majority of the proposed work will be done in the Umatilla and Walla Walla Subbasins with a small amount in adjacent North Fork John Day Subbasin.

Relationship to Other Projects:


Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

8710001

Anadromous habitat enhancement in the Umatilla Basin

Complimentary, ODFW * CTUIR Riparian lease agreement

9604500

Instream and riparian habitat enhancement in Buckaroo, Mission, Wildhorse, and McKay Creek

Complimentary, CTUIR 1996




B.O. RPA 153

This proposal focuses on accelerating the protection of riparian areas on private lands by utilizating the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program.




B.O. RPA 154

Through this proposal staff assistance will be provided to the Subbasin Assessment and Planning process to coordinate local input and needs.

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

As described above, this project is both timely and potentially highly effective for improving and expanding the riparian protection work already undertaken in the Umatilla and Walla Walla Subbasins. This project to develop and implement CCRP/CREP riparian buffer plans directly supports strategies and actions identified in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary and Walla Walla Subbasin Summary currently under review by the Northwest Power Planning Council:

Strategy 2 - Protect, enhance or restore water quality to improve the survival, abundance and distribution of indigenous and anadromous fish: Action 2.1 Reduce stream temperatures by restoring or enhancing riparian vegetation, floodplain function and increasing hyporehic and instream flows; Action 2.3 Implement and enforce provisions of the Umatilla River Ag. Water Quality Management Plan; Action 2.7 Implement the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), Continuous Conservation Reserve Program (CCRP) Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) and other pertinent State, Tribal and local programs along riparian zones and in other sensitive areas; Action 2.8 Use existing cooperative or regulatory programs to reduce sediment delivery to stream channels for roads, agriculture, logging and other land use activities.
Strategy 3 - Protect, enhance or restore instream and riparian habitat to improve water the survival, abundance and distribution of indigenous and anadromous fish: Action 3.4(Walla Walla 3.5) Over long term, restore riparian vegetation and adjacent valley bottom and upland vegetation to result in the long term recruitment of large woody debris; Action 3.6 Reduce sediment deposition in area streams by reducing erosion and delivery to waterways.
In addition to supporting actions identified above for fish, it supports the wildlife objective and associated strategies called out in the summary (pp.142, Umatilla).
Objective: Protect and enhance riparian and wetland habitat.

Strategy: Initiate actions to increase high quality riparian and wetland habitat through restoration of degraded riparian habitat; Initiate actions to increase size (width & length) and connectivity of existing riparian patches (i.e. reduce fragmentation) through restoration and acquisition efforts.

At the local level, this project supports the objectives for the Umatilla Basin Agricultural Water Quality Management Area Plan (AWQMAP) (September1999) to improve the quality of water in the Umatilla Subbasin through planning and implementation of scientifically based conservation practices (page 5) The Walla Walla Basin AWQMAP committee is nearing completion of a draft for public review. The CTUIR will be developing a separate AWQMAP to address agricultural resource concerns on the reservation. www.oda.state.or.us/Natural_Resource/agwqmpr.htm


Umatilla AWQMAP Goals and Objectives 1.A. Promote upland and stream-side management practices to limit soil erosion and pollution caused by agricultural activities as close to the source as possible, through compliance with the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control prevention and control measures.
Umatilla AWQMAP Streamside Area Management1.C. Promote streambank stabilization and the restoration and enhancement of wetlands and riparian habitat through implementation for appropriate Management Practices.

Buffers remove sediment and nutrients, stabilize stream banks, improve fish habitat, provide food sources, nesting cover and shelter for wildlife. More details on buffers and their effects can be found in a fact sheet at the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) website: www.ctic.purdue.edu/Core4/news/annc/Bufferfact.html or at the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) web site: www.nhq.nrcs.usda.gov/CCS/Buffers.html.

BPA is identified as the lead agency to support development of the 303(d) lists and TMDL’s in the course of planning. Objective 1 states, “ Support development of state or tribal 303(d) lists and TMDLs (the Walla Walla Basin is in development); Objective 2 states, “provide funding to implement measures with direct ESA benefit and are recommended in approved TMDL’s”. (The Umatilla Basin expects EPA approval by April 12, 2001) www.salmonrecovery.gov/strategy.shtml

Riparian vegetation is considered a high priority management action by the Umatilla Basin TMDL/WQMP and is emphasized because it has dual advantage of being one of the most readily available measures and most beneficial to a wide variety of water quality and habitat impairments, and is corollary to other key attributes such as ground water input and channel narrowing. (U. WQMP page 352) This project compliments the management Plan, Areas of Emphasis by Management Category, A. Riparian Vegetation (restore to site potential), use active restoration, plant and manage, improve conditions over time, move toward site potential.

The 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) identifies two reasonable and prudent alternatives (RPAs) this proposal address. RPA 152 requests the action agencies to coordinate their efforts and support for offsite habitat enhancement measures undertaken by other Federal agencies, states, Tribes and local governments. RPA 153 specifically requests BPA to work of leverage agricultural incentive programs such as the CREP to protect 100 miles of riparian buffers per year. This project will implement riparian buffers on at least 45 miles of streams.

This project to implement riparian buffer systems supports the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Goal, Policies and Objectives described in Section 7.6, particularly 7.6B.1 helping private parties be proactive, 7.6B.3 integration of habitat work in broader watershed improvement efforts, Section 7.6B.4 provides for higher priority for actions that maximize effect for the dollar, given that this proposal seeks only funding to make technical assistance available, with other entities picking up the implementation and lease costs, it shows outstanding leveraging of funds. The project supports the provisions of 7.6C for Coordinated Habitat Planning. Establishment of Riparian Buffers clearly supports actions identified in section 7.6D to reduce sediment, improve bank stability, and water quality. Tree establishment in riparian buffers will help stabilize banks, and provide shade, reducing heating rates on hot summer days. Direct planning with private landowners supports the concepts discussed in Section 7.7.

The Tribes' Anadromous Fish Restoration Plan, Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit, p.35 identifies 7 actions of which 2 are directly addressed by establishing riparian buffers: Action 6. Protect and enhance aquatic and riparian habitat; Action 9. Increase stream bank cover, decrease water temperatures during the summer and increase stream flow.

Review Comments:

Although money exists in the State of Oregon CREP program, the SWCD is statutorily unable to use the existing money. Managers question the appropriateness of allocating F&W Program money to administer (i.e., fund FTE) USDA projects. This project needs to be implemented consistent with limiting factors and problem locations identified in subbasin summaries and eventually subbasin planning to insure fisheries benefits to target species. There needs to be oversight by the COTR to insure that actions taken will benefit fish and wildlife.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

152,368

Category: Recommended Action



156,939

Category: Recommended Action



161,647

Category: Recommended Action




Project: 25081 – Improve Upstream Fish Passage in the Birch Creek Watershed
Sponsor: ODFW
Short Description:

Improve upstream fish passage in the Birch Creek watershed (Umatilla River tributary) for the benefit of summer steelhead and redband trout by removing structures or building fishways over existing irrigation diversion dams.

Abbreviated Abstract:

While most passage problems in the mainstem Umatilla River have been addressed, much remains to be done in regard to tributary upstream passage. The Umatilla Subbasin Summary identifies eleven passage barriers in the Birch Creek drainage that have yet to be treated. These passage barriers limit production by causing delay or injury to summer steelhead adults and by causing mortality to juveniles by not providing connectivity between habitats. The proposed project will address five of the identified barriers over the next three years. Two of the barriers will be addressed in 2002. Three barriers will potentially be removed and two will have new fishway’s constructed.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

198710002

Umatilla Fish Habitat Improvement

Use of equipment and personnel for project design

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

This project is linked to the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds by addressing factors for the decline of wild summer steelhead in the Umatilla subbasin. Executive Order No. EO 99-01 states in paragraph 1 “The Oregon Plan first addressed coho salmon on the Oregon Coast, was then broadened to include steelhead trout on the coast and in the lower Columbia River, and is now expanding to all at-risk wild salmonids throughout the state [emphasis added]. The Oregon Plan addresses all factors for the decline of these species, including watershed conditions and fisheries, to the extent those factors can be affected by the state.”

With regard to anadromous fish losses due to the Columbia River Hydropower System, the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program provides three objectives: 1) halt declining trends, 2) restore the widest set of healthy naturally reproducing populations of salmon and steelhead in each relevant province, and 3) increase runs above Bonneville to five million fish by 2025. The proposed project will assist the NWPPC in accomplishing each of these objectives by increasing steelhead production in the Umatilla subbasin.

The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, “directs significant attention to rebuilding healthy, naturally producing fish and wildlife populations by protecting and restoring habitats and the biological systems within them. The proposed restoration project will result in better connectivity of habitats in the Birch Creek watershed and decrease injury associated with negotiating passage barriers. These results support this fish and Wildlife program directive.

Under “Habitat Actions” the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Biological Opinion regarding the Columbia River Hydropower system provides three overarching objectives: 1) protect existing high quality habitat, 2) restore degraded habitats on a priority basis and connect them to other functioning habitats, and 3) prevent further degradation of tributary and estuary habitats and water quality.” The proposed project specifically addresses objective number two. Additionally, under section 9.6.2.1 Actions Related to Tributary Habitat, one of the objectives is “Passage and diversion improvements – address in-stream obstructions and diversions that interfere with or harm listed species. The proposed project will accomplish this objective in the Birch Creek watershed.”

The proposed project is directly tied to the goals and objectives of the Umatilla Subbasin Summary. Goal one of the subbasin summary states, “Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of summer steelhead, bull trout, shellfish and other indigenous fish. . .” Strategy 5 of the subbasin summary states, “improve fish passage conditions at all man made passage impediments for resident and anadromous, upstream and downstream migrants.” More specifically, action 5.1 states, modify or remove culverts, bridges, grade controls and water diversion structures as necessary to improve fish passage.

Passage needs in the Birch Creek watershed are specifically identified in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary as both a limiting factor and a fish need in the Birch Creek system.

Review Comments:

Project addresses NMFS RPA (numbers will be provided by NMFS). Repairing barriers is a high priority and should be funded. Repairs will be consistent with NMFS criteria. Reviewers question the need to monitor each passage improvement. However, M&E activities are viewed as a recommended action.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

300,410

Category: High Priority (correcting passage barriers)



210,410

Category: High Priority (correcting passage barriers)



233,535

Category: High Priority (correcting passage barriers)




Project: 25093 – Characterize Genetic Differences and Distribution of Freshwater Mussles
Sponsor: CTUIR
Short Description:

Conduct freshwater mussel surveys to assess their status and test for geographical genetic differences among the western pearlshell mussel, Margaritifera falcata.

Abbreviated Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to provide the critical information on the status of freshwater shellfish—especially the western pearlshell mussel, Margaratifera falcata—that is called for in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary. This information is essential for restoration of freshwater mussels and associated traditional and cultural uses. Freshwater mussels were vital components of intact salmonid ecosystems that have been affected directly and indirectly by dams, habitat deterioration, and decline in salmon; they are culturally important to Native Americans; and little is known about their distribution, status, and population structure to guide recovery actions. The project has three objectives: 1) to survey the distribution and status of freshwater mussels in the Umatilla River, where they may be extinct, and the Middle Fork John Day River, where they may remain using the first stage of two-stage adaptive cluster sampling; 2) to determine macro and microhabitat factors that control distribution and abundance; and 3) to test whether genetic population structure exists in M. falcata by examining five aggregations in the Columbia River and an outgroup using microsatellite DNA variation. Both these objectives provide information that will be useful for restoration efforts elsewhere in the Basin.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

9000501

Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation

This project is part of the overall goal to recover an intact, fully functioning, salmonid-producing river in the Umatilla River. The CTUIR has numerous projects focusing on recovery of the Umatilla River Basin for salmonids and other species, such as

8373600

Umatilla Passage Facility Operations and Maintenance

Pacific lampreys. The restoration project for the Pacific lampreys has the closest relationship to this project, because both focus on restoration of species that require healthly salmon populations for their persistence.

8802200

Umatilla Fish Passage Operations




9506000

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration




8710001

Umatilla Fish Habitat Enhancement




Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

This project is essential to conserve and restore freshwater mussels in the Umatilla River. The project addresses the needs outlined in the Umatilla Subbasin Summary and the provisions of the Fish and Wild Program. The Umatilla Subbasin Summary calls for strategies to “conduct initial investigations and develop a restoration plan for freshwater shellfish in the Umatilla River.” Our first objective addresses Action 15.1, which is to “conduct qualitative and quantitative surveys to assess shellfish populations.” Our second objective addresses Action 15.3, which is to “determine macrohabitat and physiochemical factors controlling distribution and abundance. Our third objective addresses Action 15.2, which is to “survey genetic variation within and among Umatilla and selected Columbia River subbasins.”

Mussels are also covered under Section 10 (Resident Fish) of the 1994 Fish and Wild Program. The stated goal of the program is “to recover and preserve the health of native resident fish injured by the hydropower system.” Dams affected mussels directly through habitat loss and indirectly through the impacts on host salmon. Our first and second objectives are addressed in Section 10.1A.2, which states that Bonneville shall “fund the fishery managers’ efforts to complete assessments of resident fish losses throughout the Columbia River Basin.” Section 10.2A.1 prioritizes projects for “weak, but recoverable, native populations” and projects that “also provide benefits for wildlife and/or anadromous fish.” Our third objective—a survey of genetic diversity in M. falcata—falls under Section 10.2B.1, which notes that for efforts that might involve artificial propagation (including transfers) “a thorough and comprehensive approach to conserving genetic diversity is needed for native species.” It also notes that it is necessary to develop “a plan for conserving genetic diversity as called for in measure 7.1D.1.” An assessment of genetic diversity is crucial to fulfill both of these.

Review Comments:

Historically, freshwater mussels were an important subsistence species for the CTUIR. However, mussel populations have declined and as a result mussels can no longer be used for purposes of subsistence. Mussels have been listed as candidate species in the Willamette River. However, little, if anything, is known about freshwater mussel distribution, abundance and habitat quality east of the Cascades. The ODFW suggests that there is a need to initiate this type of work. The reviewers recommend that preliminary genetic analyses should be limited to mtDNA (RFLPs) analyses. Microsatellite analyses should only be used if mtDNA data are not conclusive.


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

311,907

Category: High Priority



343,097

Category: High Priority



377,406

Category: High Priority





Project: 200002300 – Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites – Oregon, Horn Butte (Philippi Property)
Sponsor: ODFW
Short Description:

Protect and enhance shrub-steppe and native bunch grass habitat in the Horn Butte area to mitigate for wildlife impacts by the Columbia River Federal hydropower system.

Abbreviated Abstract:

The intent of this project is to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and native bunch grass habitat in the Horn Butte area within the Willow Creek watershed near the town of Arlington, Oregon. This project has been on-going since FY 1999 when it was proposed under the Oregon Wildlife Coalition’s (OWC’s) programmatic land acquisition project, Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites – Oregon (Project No. 199705900). Horn Butte was included in the OWC’s list of priority project sites to be funded with dollars made available to the OWC. Two parcels totaling about 7,000 acres were identified in the Horn Butte area and targeted for potential land acquisition and/or conservation easement. The NWPPC made funding recommendations for the OWC’s continued acquisition project in FY 1999 ($4 million), FY 2000 ($3.96 million), and FY 2001 ($2.6 million). In FY 2000, ODFW also submitted a request for $400,000 for acquisition/easement of the Boeing Tract (BAIC Tract) and first-year implementation funds for the Horn Butte Philippi parcel ($42,302). These were approved for funding by the NWPPC.

Since 1998, discussions have been occurring with multiple landowners in the Horn Butte area. On February 1, 2001 the Trust For Public Land signed an option to purchase agreement with the Philippi Family, owners of one of the parcels targeted for acquisition. The OWC currently has $50,000 available through their programmatic project allocations which will pay for pre-acquisition activities at Philippi. Funds that had been intended to be used for property purchase at Horn Butte were re-directed by the OWC to other Council approved land acquisition projects. This project proposal outlines how the previously allocated $50,000 will be spent and shows out-year funding requests for purchase and enhancement of the Philippi property.

The Philippi property is 4,761 acres and lies adjacent to about 4,300 acres of Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands, known as the Horn Butte Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern. The Philippi property is one of the few remaining contiguous tracts of native shrub-steppe and grassland habitats. The project will benefit numerous shrub-steppe obligate species such as long-billed curlew, ferruginous hawk, Swainson’s hawk, burrowing owl, loggerhead shrike, grasshopper sparrow, sagebrush lizard, and Washington ground squirrel. Wildlife mitigation target species associated with the Lower Columbia River mainstem hydrofacilities will also benefit (e.g., California quail, western meadowlark).


Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship



Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Col. Mainstem and Lower Snake Facilities (BPA 1984)


Reviewed past, present and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at BPA's hydrofacilities. Called for quantitative and qualitative assessment of wildlife losses attributable to the dams and implementation of mitigation plans.




Wildlife Impact Assessment: Bonneville, McNary, The Dalles, and John Day projects. (Rasumssen and Wright 1990).

Evaluated pre- and post- dam construction/inundation habitat conditions and estimated wildlife losses using the HEP methodology.

199208400

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning (OTAP) Project (BPA 1993)

Identified and evaluated potential wildlife mitigation sites within Oregon

9565

Assessing OTAP Project Using Gap Analysis (ODFW 1997)

Refinement of OTAP Project. Identified and evaluated potential wildlife mitigation sites in Oregon using Gap Analysis techniques

199705900

FY 1999 Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Oregon

OWC's programmatic project proposal that included the Horn Butte project on a list of priority projects. The requested and approved $4 mill would fund projects from the list as they were ready to be implemented. Horn Butte project budget for acq: $1 mill


Project #


Title/description

Nature of relationship

199705900

FY 2000 Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Oregon

OWC's programmatic project proposal that included the Horn Butte project in priority list. OWC requested $5 mill, NWPPC approved $3.96 mill to fund projects from priority list as they were ready. Horn Butte project budget for acquisition: $400,000

20116

FY 2000 Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Oregon, Horn Butte

ODFW FY 00 project proposal for Horn Butte. Project request was $400,000 for continued land acquisition/easement (to be funded under OWC's Project No. 199705900) and $42,302 for first-year project implementation

199705900

FY 2001 Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Oregon

OWC's budget update proposal that included the Horn Butte project in priority list. OWC requested $6 million of new funds. NWPPC approved $2.6 million. Horn Butte project budget: $1 million

200002300

FY 2001 Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Oregon, Horn Butte

ODFW's FY 01 budget update proposal that requested carrying forward NWPPC-approved FY 00 funds ($42,302) for first -year project implementation.


200002300

Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Oregon, Horn Butte (BAIC Tract)

TNC/ODFW joint FY 02 Columbia Plateau solicitation proposal to acquire 22,642 acres of native shrub steppe and grassland habitat near Boardman, OR. Complements Horn Butte - Philippi property purchase.


Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

This project will help achieve the wildlife goals and objectives within the Umatilla/ Willow Creek Subbasin. As outlined in the Umatilla River Subbasin Summary, the primary goal of natural resource managers within the subbasin is restore and/or stabilize native fish, wildlife and plant species. The following specific goals and objectives identified in the subbasin summary will be addressed by this project:





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