Writers Team Members



Download 2.86 Mb.
Page30/41
Date conversion14.06.2018
Size2.86 Mb.
1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   41

Wildlife


habitat losses caused by the development and operation of the hydropower system.

  • Maintain wildlife diversity by protecting and enhancing populations and habitats of native wildlife at self-sustaining levels throughout natural geographic ranges.

  • Provide recreational, educational, aesthetic, scientific, economic and cultural benefits derived from Oregon’s diversity of wildlife.

  • Ensure long-term maintenance of healthy populations of native landbirds

  • Identify, establish standards, and implement management measures required for restoring threatened and endangered species, preventing sensitive species from having to be listed as threatened or endangered, and maintaining or enhancing other species requiring special attention.



Shrub Steppe Habitat


  • Acquire high quality privately owned shrub steppe habitats and move them to protected status

  • Protect and enhance remaining shrub steppe habitats

  • Initiate actions to enhance size and connectivity of existing quality shrub steppe patches (i.e., reduce fragmentation)

  • Minimize further degradation of shrub steppe habitat (e.g., reduce, eliminate or improve livestock grazing practices)

  • Maintain cryptogamic crusts where they occur, and seek ecologically appropriate sites for restoration to ensure proper functioning native plant communities

  • Maintain sites dominated by native vegetation and initiate actions to prevent infestations of exotic vegetation
  • Improve habitat for grassland-associated wildlife species by managing non-native grasslands (e.g., agricultural lands, inactive grasslands such as CRP and fallow fields) as suitable habitat where biologically appropriate (i.e., where viable landbird populations can be maintained).


  • Expand shrub steppe focal species distribution and abundance by establishing Shrub Steppe Bird Conservation Areas

  • Implement land use practices consistent with growth of native plants and forbs



Riparian and Wetland Habitat


  • Protect and enhance riparian and wetland habitat by limiting grazing intensity to maintain the integrity of native species composition and health


The Horn Butte Project addresses the following wildlife needs identified in the Umatilla River Subbasin Summary:

Protect Stronghold Habitats – emphasize habitat acquisition where opportunities exist.
Grassland and Shrub Steppe Habitat

  • Protect, maintain and enhance shrub steppe habitats

  • Improve connectivity between existing shrub steppe fragments

  • Enhance and restore native perennial grassland habitats

  • Reduce non-native annual grasses in shrub-steppe and grassland habitat

  • Pursue and implement effective biological controls on noxious weeds including yellow- star thistle and knapweeds

As a habitat protection and restoration project, this project addresses the NWPPC’s primary wildlife strategy to complete the current mitigation program for construction and inundation losses as described in the 1995 and Draft 2000 Fish and Wildlife Programs (NWPPC 1995 and NWPPC 2000). NWPPC strategies and guidelines related to the determination of habitat credit through use of Habitat Evaluation Procedures, allocation of Habitat Units, and protection of habitat through fee-title are also addressed. This project will provide mitigation credits to BPA for losses to wildlife and wildlife habitat resulting from the John Day Dam. NWPPC 1995 and 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program Table 11-4 losses will be addressed, specifically for the following John Day Dam target species: western meadowlark and mink California quail associated with the riparian/riverine and shrub steppe priority habitats.

The Horn Butte area has been identified as a high priority project site by the Oregon Wildlife Coalition. The project helps the Oregon managers achieve the goal of helping BPA fully mitigate for impacts to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the federal hydropower system.

Purchase and enhancement of the Philippi property is consistent with the guidelines of the Oregon Plan. As called for the Oregon Plan, protection and improvement of upland and riparian/riverine habitats will provide protection for resident western redband trout.

Review Comments:

This parcel is the last contiguous area of shrub steppe habitat and is home to many imperiled species. Through this project (I.e., acquisition) shrub steppe habitat would be protected .


Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

50,000

Category: Crediting Resolution



1,350,000

Category: Crediting Resolution



65,000

Category: Crediting Resolution





Project: 200020116 – Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites – Oregon, Horn Butte (BAIC Tract)
Sponsor: TNC
Short Description:

Protect and enhance the BAIC Tract in the Horn Butte area, which includes 22,642 acres of shrub-steppe and native bunchgrass, to mitigate for wildlife impacts from the Federal Columbia River Hydropower System.

Abbreviated Abstract:

The 22,642-acre BAIC Tract is located within the Horn Butte Wildlife Mitigation Project Area (WMP) near Boardman, Oregon. The site has been identified as a significant wildlife habitat in both the Mainstem Columbia and Umatilla Subbasins (Ward et al. 2001, Saul et al. 2001). Together with the adjacent 46,126-acre Naval Weapons System Training Facility, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Willow Creek Wildlife Management Area, and the Bureau of Land Management’s Horn Butte Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern, the Horn Butte WMP constitutes the largest remaining undeveloped shrub-steppe habitat in the Oregon portion of the Columbia Basin. The BAIC Tract has high-quality occurrences of bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) shrub steppe, Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) steppe, basin big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata) steppe, bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoregneria spicata) grasslands and needle-and-thread (Stipa comata) grasslands. At least nine state and federally listed threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species occur at the Tract.

The property is owned by the State of Oregon and administered by the Department of Administrative Services. The State entered into a 77-year lease over the property in 1963 with the Boeing Company (now BAIC) for space-age industrial and agricultural development. The lease gives BAIC exclusive control over the property.

This proposal seeks $5,518,669 to acquire the forty-year private leasehold interest over 22,642 acres and then transfer the property for use as wildlife mitigation; and complete NEPA review, baseline assessments, and a mitigation and management plan for the tract. This project would take advantage of a time-limited opportunity to permanently protect the BAIC Tract and thereby enhance the survival of numerous species that are closely associated with declining shrub-steppe habitat in the Columbia Plateau Province, and achieve direct and immediate benefits for wildlife. Significant cost sharing for the project includes a permanent commitment of up to $130,000/year for annual operations and maintenance from BAIC and in-kind contributions from The Nature Conservancy, and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to complete the transaction and baseline assessments of the property.

Relationship to Other Projects:

Project #

Title/description

Nature of relationship

199208400

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project

Identified Horn Butte Area as priority for wildlife mitigation

199506500

Assessing OTAP Process Using GAP Analysis

Identified Horn Butte Area as priority for wildlife mitigation

199705900

Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Oregon

Umbrella project identified acquisition of shrubsteppe and grassland habitats in Horn Butte area as a priority

200020116

Securing Wildlife Mitigation Sites - Horn Butte, Oregon

Complements this ODFW project to acquire and protect lands in Horn Butte area

Relationship to Existing Goals, Objectives and Strategies:

Protection of the BAIC Tract will provide direct habitat benefits on over 22,642-acres of high quality shrub steppe and grassland habitat and enhance habitat values on the adjacent Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility at Boardman (46,126 acres), the Bureau of Land Management’s Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern at Horn Butte (4,300 acres) and the proposed Philippi/Horn Butte Acquisition (4,761 acres) by providing connectivity and improved habitat management to this critical intervening parcel. In addition, the project will complement wildlife management efforts on the nearby Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Willow Creek and Irrigon Wildlife Areas, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla’s Wanaket Wildlife Area, and the Umatilla and Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuges. In addition, acquisition of the 22,642-acre BAIC Tract will further conservation goals of Partners in Flight (Altman and Holmes 2000) and the Oregon Biodiversity Project (1997).


This acquisition will also advance policies, guidelines, goals, strategies, and actions described in the following plans:
Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Summary
Wildlife


  1. Protect, enhance, or restore wildlife populations to sustainable levels, and provide

ecological, cultural, and sociological benefits

  1. Maintain or increase wildlife species diversity

  2. Protect, enhance, and restore wildlife habitat in the subbasin

  3. Acquire or lease lands with priority habitats to permanently protect wildlife habitats

in the subbasin

  1. Protect federal and state threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species

  2. Provide protection for federal and state threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species in all resource management plans

  3. Various steps to effectively protect shrub-steppe associated raptors, migratory songbirds, and sage grouse


Shrub-Steppe Habitat

  1. Reduce (through restoration) and prevent further degradation and fragmentation of large contiguous blocks of shrub-steppe habitat

  2. Evaluate shrub-steppe restoration techniques and share information between agencies, tribes, private landowners and other groups involved in shrub-steppe restoration

  3. Develop and implement shrub-steppe restoration techniques that are economically feasible over large landscapes


Umatilla Subbasin Summary
Wildlife

  1. Achieve and sustain levels of species productivity to mitigate for wildlife and wildlife
  2. habitat losses caused by the development and operation of the hydropower system.


  3. Maintain wildlife diversity by protecting and enhancing populations and habitats of native wildlife at self-sustaining levels throughout natural geographic ranges.

  4. Provide recreational, educational, aesthetic, scientific, economic and cultural benefits derived from Oregon’s diversity of wildlife.

  5. Ensure long-term maintenance of healthy populations of native landbirds

  6. Identify, establish standards, and implement management measures required for restoring threatened and endangered species, preventing sensitive species from having to be listed as threatened or endangered, and maintaining or enhancing other species requiring special attention.



Shrub Steppe Habitat


  1. Acquire high quality privately owned shrub steppe habitats and move them to protected status

  2. Protect and enhance remaining shrub steppe habitats

  3. Initiate actions to enhance size and connectivity of existing quality shrub steppe patches (i.e., reduce fragmentation)

  4. Minimize further degradation of shrub steppe habitat (e.g., reduce, eliminate or improve livestock grazing practices)

  5. Maintain cryptogamic crusts where they occur, and seek ecologically appropriate sites for restoration to ensure proper functioning native plant communities

  6. Maintain sites dominated by native vegetation and initiate actions to prevent infestations of exotic vegetation

  7. Improve habitat for grassland-associated wildlife species by managing non-native grasslands (e.g., agricultural lands, inactive grasslands such as CRP and fallow fields) as suitable habitat where biologically appropriate (i.e., where viable landbird populations can be maintained).

  8. Expand shrub steppe focal species distribution and abundance by establishing Shrub Steppe Bird Conservation Areas
  9. Implement land use practices consistent with growth of native plants and forbs



Protect Stronghold Habitats – emphasize habitat acquisition where opportunities exist.
Grassland and Shrub Steppe Habitat

  1. Protect, maintain and enhance shrub steppe habitats

  2. Improve connectivity between existing shrub steppe fragments

  3. Enhance and restore native perennial grassland habitats

  4. Reduce non-native annual grasses in shrub-steppe and grassland habitat

  5. Pursue and implement effective biological controls on noxious weeds including yellow- star thistle and knapweeds


2000 Fish and Wildlife Program
Vision – A Columbia Basin ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife, mitigating across the basin for the adverse effects for fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem and providing the benefits from fish and wildlife valued by the people of the region.
Wildlife Mitigation Objectives 2, 4, 5, and Habitat Strategies 1 and 2, NWPPC 2000, page 26).
Wildlife

  1. Develop and implement habitat acquisition and enhancement projects to fully mitigate for identified losses

  2. Maintain existing and created habitat values

  3. Monitor and evaluate habitat and species responses to mitigation actions


Habitat

  1. Identify current condition and biological potential of the habitat, and then protect or restore it to the extent described in the biological objectives

  2. Build from strength

  3. Restore ecosystems, not just single species

Review Comments:

This parcel is the last contiguous area of shrub steppe habitat and is home to many imperiled species. Through this project (I.e., acquisition) priceless shrub steppe habitat would be protected.

Budget:

FY02

FY03

FY04

5,518,669

Category: Crediting Resolution



120,000

Category: Crediting Resolution



120,000

Category: Crediting Resolution






1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   41


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page