Y2: Autumn Fiction: Plan 1a familiar Settings Main texts: a lion in the Meadow Margaret Mahy, You Choose



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Y2: Autumn Fiction: Plan 1A Familiar Settings Main texts: A Lion in the Meadow Margaret Mahy, You Choose Nick Sharratt/Pippa Goodhart


Wk 1

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Whole class teaching

Show chn A Lion in the Meadow by Margaret Mahy. Tell them it’s about a boy who makes up stories, which to him seem very real. Chn talk for a couple of min about stories they like to make up. Look at the title page and discuss the picture. Where do they think the story might be set? It’s in the countryside. What are the words (vocabulary) that go with that setting? Fields, hedges, trees, etc. Start a useful vocab page with a heading for different familiar settings on the flipchart or board (see resources). Read A Lion in the Meadow and discuss whether they think there is a real lion and dragon or is it the little boy’s imagination? There are 4 settings used in the book – can the chn identify them? Kitchen, garden, meadow and bedroom.

Spoken Language 1 / Comprehension 1


What is happening in A Lion in the Meadow? What is a ‘true’ story? The lion says, “Some stories are true and some aren’t...” Has the boy made up a story that he is then frightened of, or does he really think there is a lion and a dragon? We don’t really know. Can chn remember a game or story they play now or played when they were little where they frightened themselves! Talk to a partner and then share with class (tell or make up one of your own). Show chn You Choose by Nick Sharratt and Pippa Goodhart (a fantastic book for helping with story ideas). Look at page Why not get yourself a pet... and find the lion & the dragon. Read speech bubble A huge huggy lion. Go back to A Lion in the Meadow and find the descriptions of the lion (big yellow lion, big, roaring, yellow, whiskery lion). Underline the adjectives and remind chn of their function. Grammar 1


For today’s comprehension you can use the poster book version of The Pet that Flew/Tilly (one of Hamilton Trust’s Animated Tales). Today chn will read a story about another unusual creature that comes into someone’s house. However, first explain what exclamation marks are used for. You can use exclamation marks to show strong feelings, e.g. And she would wish – VERY HARD – that she had a pet! This story is about Tilly who is desperate for a pet. Look at pages 1-9 of the Animated Tale The Pet that Flew/Tilly. Read the text carefully together sounding out unfamiliar words. Chn raise their hands every time they see an exclamation mark. Click on the nest on p5 and p9 and discuss and try and answer the questions. Word Reading 1/ Comprehension 2: Group Reading

Show chn the resource they answered when group reading yesterday - Questions about The Pet that Flew/Tilly. Ask them what they notice about the sentences (they start with a capital letter and end with a question mark). Questions often start with the words -How, what, why, when, where, which. Write these on f/c or use plan resource. Ask chn to think of questions Tilly might have wanted to ask the librarian or the librarian ask her. What might she have wanted to find from find out from a book. If you have a non-fiction book about swallows this would be useful to show chn. Write/type the questions using red for capital letters and full stops.

Grammar 2


Remind the chn of the two stories they have heard and read this week and explain they are going to write their own story about an animal that comes to live under the stairs. It could be a real life scenario like The Pet that Flew/Tilly or include fantasy like A Lion in the Meadow. Talk about the difference.

Fill in the chart Animals you could really find under the stairs, etc. chart together using the Why not get yourself a pet... page of You Choose to help with ideas (see resources).

Show chn the cupboard illustration leaflet (plan resource - photocopied back to back). Open the leaflet to see the cupboard and discuss which animal they are going to find.

Grammar 3





Objectives

Dimension

Resources

Spoken Lang

Listen & respond appropriately to peers

Articulate and justify opinions

Give well-structured descriptions


1. Monday: Thinking about the vocabulary of settings

Chn discuss the different settings in the book. They talk about these settings in a house they know and like. Encourage chn to listen to each other as well as articulating their own ideas.



See Monday Comprehension 2

Use spoken language to develop understanding through hypothesising

Participate in reading discussions.



2. Wednesday: Answering questions about a text

Chn discuss a text that they are reading together. They should discuss the questions and agree what answers they want to give.



See Wednesday Comprehension 2

Comprehension

Understand the books they can already read accurately and fluently by:

a. drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by teacher

Listening to and discussing stories

1. Monday: Thinking about the vocabulary of settings

Give each chd a copy of the resource about the settings in A Lion in the Meadow (kitchen, garden, meadow, bedroom). They draw a quick picture of each setting and write as many nouns as they can that relate to that setting (see resources).


Plenary: Chn work in pairs to see if their partner has thought of any words that they have not. They add those words to their list and vice versa.


Grid - Story Vocabulary for different settings

Grid about the settings in A Lion in the Meadow (see resources)



Understand the books they can already read accurately and fluently by:

d. answering and asking questions

e. predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far


2. Wednesday: Answering questions about a text

Read The Pet that Flew/Tilly as a group, pausing to discuss parts. Use the resource sheet and work together to answer questions about The Pet that Flew/Tilly as you go (see Wednesday Word Reading 1 and Spoken Language 2).




Questions about The Pet that Flew/Tilly (see resources)


Word Reading

Transcription

Pupils should be taught to:

f. read most words quickly and accurately

g. read aloud books sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation

1. Wednesday: Group reading

Continue to read the Hamilton Group Reading book - The Pet that Flew from p10. Give the chn questions to think about and discuss (see resources). Ask them to notice any exclamation marks and to read those sentences extra carefully to see if they can work out why they have been used.


Plenary: Discuss the differences and similarities between The Pet that Flew/Tilly and A Lion in the Meadow. Both about animals coming into children’s lives, TPTF/Tilly could perhaps be true while there is an element of fantasy in ALITM.


Hamilton Trust’s group reading book - The Pet that Flew/Tilly (see resources)

Questions about The Pet that Flew/Tilly (see resources)




Grammar

Develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:

a. learning how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly, including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks & question marks

b. learning how to use:

expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. the blue butterfly

Use grammar terminology

1. Tuesday: Finding a character and describing it

Give pairs reduced size photocopies of the Why not get yourself a pet ... page in You Choose. Explain that they are going to write a story about an animal that comes to live in their house in the cupboard under the stairs. In pairs, chn do lots of talking about the animals, which they like, what they know about them. Then they choose one, draw a picture of them and write a sentence using adjectives to describe them, e.g. A big, brown, bouncy, smiling kangaroo. A tiny, fluffy, yellow chick, etc. They check they have started the sentence with a capital letter and finished with a full stop. Model this for chn first. When they have done one, they choose another animal and repeat.


Plenary: Chn underline their best sentence about their favourite animal and read it out. They also show how they have used correct punctuation.


A reduced size photocopy of the Why not get yourself a pet ... page in You Choose One for each pair

Develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:

a. learning how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly, including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks & question marks



2. Thursday: Punctuating sentences using capital letters, full stops and question marks

Chn write questions that Tilly or the librarian might have asked using a question word at the beginning of each question. They carefully use capital letters and question marks. They then write a sentence answering the question making sure they have a capital letter and a full stop. Continue with more questions and answers.



Plenary: Watch an animation by David Attenborough about migration of swallows at

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/life/Barn_Swallow#p014dfr9.

Words useful for starting questions (see resources)

Develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:

b. learning how to use:

expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. the blue butterfly

Use grammar terminology


3. Friday: Choosing and describing an animal

Photocopy the two cupboard illustrations back to back (see resources). Give each chd a copy folded in half. They then talk to a partner about the animal that they will find under the stairs in their story. Use the photocopied page from You Choose to help with ideas. They think of words and phrases to describe their animal and say them to their partner. Then they draw their animal in the cupboard and write the descriptive words and phrases they thought of round the character.


Plenary: Put all the drawings and descriptions on the tables. Everybody walks round and admires them and makes lots of positive comments!


Cupboard under the stairs illustrations (see resources)



Wk 2

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Whole class teaching

Today chn will think of problems and solutions for a story about an animal under the stairs in their home. To recap: the story setting is in their home and they have decided on the animal. Now they will have to think about how it got to their house and a ‘problem’ to solve. Identify the ‘problems’ in the 2 stories you have read. 1) The boy is scared of the lion and then scared of the dragon. 2) Tilly wants a pet but needs know how to look after it and then be brave enough to let it go.

Sit in a circle and play ‘Unfortunately and Luckily’ as a warm up. Start the circle with ‘I found a tiger/mouse/animal of your choice/ under the stairs’. Next person says, e.g. Unfortunately it drank all the milk in the fridge’. Next person says, e.g. ‘Luckily the milkman arrived and brought more.’ Then ‘Unfortunately the tiger climbed onto the milk float without him seeing.’ ‘Luckily there was a tiger expert in town...’ etc. Then brainstorm some possible ‘problems’ for their stories and jot down the ideas (see resource), e.g. Their mum or dad don’t like having a bear/snake/elephant! The animal eats too much/ misses its mum/ makes a mess/noise, etc. How could the ‘problems’ be solved? Spoken Language 3 /Composition 1


The chn will plan a story today. If you have the book There’s no such thing as a Dragon by Jack Kent read it to the chn. It is a humorous take on a similar theme to A Lion in the Meadow. Billy’s mother keeps saying ‘There’s no such thing as a dragon’ until it grows so big she just has to notice it. Alternatively read a book of your choice that might be helpful with story writing ideas.

Explain and model different ways to plan a story with the chn (story map, story mountain etc. – see resources). Or use the framework your school prefers. Show how to do quick sketches and how to move the story along. Jot down useful words. How is the animal going to get in the cupboard? Where does it come from? Spoken Language 4 /Composition 2



Focus on spelling skills. Have a look at the /j/ phoneme (Appx 1 Spelling page vi).

Show chn plan resource and read the words beginning with /j/. The letter j is never used for the /j/ sound at the end of English words.

At the end of a word the /j/ sound is spelt -dge after short vowels.

After all other sounds whether vowels or consonants the /j/ is spelt as –ge at the end of a word.

Read the words together and add your own examples. Then read the story Badger (see resources). Ask the chn to raise their hands every time they hear the /j/ phoneme. Highlight the graphemes.

Word reading / Transcription 2


Today the chn will write the first part of their story. Watch this clip at http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/writing-story-openings/4471.html first. Introduce/ remind chn about some useful story telling language for opening a story and moving the story along. Decode and read examples aloud together and add to them if you want to (see resource). Look at and read suitable examples of first paragraphs in story books. Encourage chn to decide which ones they think would make them want to read a story. Encourage them to ‘pinch’ and adapt ideas for their own stories.

Word reading / Transcription 3


Read some examples of first paragraphs written and copied out by the chn. Have they written an exciting start to their story?

Remind them how to continue using their story plan remembering to use capital letters and full stops. Will there be any questions in their stories so they can show they know how to use a question mark? Will they be able to use an exclamation mark? Perhaps they could write a word in capital letters to emphasise something and finish the sentence with an exclamation mark. The table fell over with a huge CRASH! Talk about how they could end their story and read a couple of examples.

Composition 3/ Grammar 4





Objectives

Dimension

Resources

Spoken Language

Listen and respond appropriately to peers

Give well-structured explanations

Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations.


Monday: Thinking of interesting problems and solutions

Chn discuss in pairs what they think their story is going to be about. What animal will they find? What problems does it cause? Chn need to articulate their ideas but also to listen to the ideas of other children as well. It should be a real discussion!



See Composition 1

Listen and respond appropriately to peers

Consider different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others.

Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas


2. Tuesday: Planning a story

Chn talk to a partner about how they will write their story. What part will they write first? What happens in the middle? How does their story end? When they have recorded a plan for their story, they practise explaining the plan out loud. They need to make it sound exciting. Chn will need to listen to each other’s plans and give feedback – maybe suggesting to their partner how to make it even better of pointing out if it isn’t clear.



See composition 2

Word Reading

Transcription

Pupils should be taught to:

b. read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain graphemes taught so far

c. read accurately words of 2 or more syllables that contain the same GPCs as above

Handwriting

b. start using some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters

a. Form lowercase letters correctly.


2. Thursday: Reading and writing useful story language Give chn access to ‘Useful story language’ resource. They write the first part (paragraph) of their story on a whiteboard. They keep changing it until they are happy with it and have had it corrected. They then copy it very carefully using joined handwriting on the first lined page of their folded leaflet.

Plenary: Sitting in small groups the chn read out their first paragraph loudly and clearly.

The folded leaflets where they drew and described their animal

Useful story language (see resources)


Pupils should be taught to:

apply spelling rules and guidelines, as listed in Appendix1

segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes

learning new ways of spelling words



3. Wednesday: Identifying and spelling grapheme choices for /j/ Give chn spelling spotter story Badger and /j/ grapheme chart photocopied back to back (see resources). Chn work in pairs and take it in turns to highlight the /j/ graphemes as they read through the story. Then in turn they write the words identified in the correct column on the back. They then check spellings.

Plenary: Watch a clip about a badger in a playground at

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/a-badger-explores-at-night/2427.html.

Spelling spotter story Badger and /j/ grapheme chart photocopied back to back (see resources)

Grammar

Develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:

a. learning how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly (see Appendix 2 )




4. Friday: Using correct punctuation when writing a longer story.

Chn use what they have learnt about Capital letters, full stops, exclamation marks and question marks when punctuating their stories (see Thursday Composition 3).



None

Composition

Consider what they are going to write before beginning by:

b. writing down ideas and/or keywords, including new vocabulary


1. Monday: Thinking of interesting problems and solutions

Chn work in pairs and discuss what the ‘problem’ could be in their story. Then draw and write 3 or more different, interesting ideas about problems and solutions (see resources).



Plenary: Revisit Story Vocabulary for Different Settings resource from Monday Week 1 and write down all the settings you might find in a home: kitchen, bedroom, etc.

Framework for recording ideas about problems and solutions (see resources)

Example of a ‘story map’ (see resources)



Consider what they are going to write before beginning by:

a. planning or saying out loud what they are going to write about

b. writing down ideas and/or key words


2. Tuesday: Planning a story

Chn plan their stories by making a story map or using a frame of your choice. They draw quick sketches and write key words. When the chn have made a story plan they will practise telling it out loud, first to themselves and then to each other. They should use interesting story vocab when telling their story. Chn work in pairs, telling their story and listening to someone else’s.



Plenary: Chn tell class about someone else’s story. What can they remember?

Frames for planning stories (see resources)

Consider what they are going to write before beginning by:

c. encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence

Develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by:

a. writing narratives, about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional)

3. Friday: Continuing to write a story Chn should reread the first part of their stories and then continue writing the rest of the story looking at their story plan. They should say each sentence out loud before writing it. Don’t forget capital letters and full stops. Prolific writers may need extra blank pages!

Plenary: Finish filling in resource started Week 1 Monday about vocab of different settings to use in future stories.


The folded leaflets where chn drew and described their animal and wrote their opening

Grid - Story Vocabulary for different settings




Books:

A Lion in the Meadow by Margaret Mahy, Puffin, ISBN: 9780140506303

You Choose by Nick Sharratt, Corgi Childrens, ISBN: 9780552547086

The Pet that Flew/Tilly Hamilton Group Reader available in sets of 6 for £9.99 from http://www.hamiltoneducation.org.uk/GroupReading_Year2.php

There’s No Such Thing as a Dragon by Jack Kent, ISBN: 9780375851377 (not essential)
Websites:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/life/Barn_Swallow#p014dfr9 Swallows migrating (narrated by David Attenborough)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/writing-story-openings/4471.html Michael Morpurgo and Jacqueline Wilson give advice on starting a story

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/a-badger-explores-at-night/2427.html Watch a badger exploring a playground

The links to the websites and the contents of the web pages associated with such links specified on this list (hereafter collectively referred to as the ‘Links’) have been checked by Hamilton Trust and to the best of Hamilton Trust’s knowledge, are correct and accurate at the time of publication. Notwithstanding the foregoing or any other terms and conditions on the Hamilton Trust website, you acknowledge that Hamilton Trust has no control over such Links and indeed, the owners of such Links may have removed such Links, changed such Links and/or contents associated with such Links. Therefore, it is your sole responsibility to verify any of the Links which you wish you use. Hamilton Trust excludes all responsibility and liability for any loss or damage arising from the use of any Links.

Outcomes

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

1. Read and enjoy listening to a story

2. Discuss the story setting.


3. Use extended vocabulary to describe the story setting.


1. Describe an animal character.

2. Write expanded noun phrases using a variety of adjectives.

3. Punctuate sentences correctly.


1. Read a story independently or in a small group.

2. Ask and answer questions about a text, discussing these with others.



1. Write questions and answers, taking the role of a story character.

2. Use question marks and capital letters and full stops correctly.



1. Invent a character for a story.

2. Write a good description.

3. Use expanded noun phrases in the description.


1. Plan a story based on a familiar story.

2. Think of a problem and a solution for their story.




1. Write notes for their story plan. 2. Read through their plan and check that it is a good story.

1. Read words with the /j/ phoneme in them.

2. Identify and use different graphemes to represent /j/ phoneme in words.



1. Start writing their story using appropriate story language. .

2. Re-read writing to check it makes sense.

3. Use correct punctuation in writing.


1. Complete their story.

2. Check that they have written what they intended to write.



3. Check that the punctuation is correct in their story. .



© Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users. Y2 Aut F Plan 1A

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