Year 5/6 Africa: Weeks 6 – 8 Literacy Narrative: Plan 3 African myths

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Year 5/6 Africa: Weeks 6 – 8 Literacy Narrative: Plan 3 African myths





Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening


Word/Sentence

Independent group activities

Outcomes

This plan links to Theme 1 of the UKS2 Africa Topic. Have a range of stories about Anansi available for chn to read during quiet reading sessions. Display a map of Africa to enable chn to locate countries that myths originate from.

Week 1 Monday


Main focus: Discover oral story telling!

5/1 Tell a story using notes.

6/1 Use a range of oral techniques to present engaging narratives.

5/4 Perform a scripted scene using dramatic conventions.

6/4 Devise a performance.

Most African countries have a rich tradition of oral story telling. What do we mean by an oral story? The story teller remembers the story & tells it in their own words, using different voices for the characters, hand gestures, facial expressions. Each time a story is told it is slightly different. Stories are passed to other people who remember them & tell them to more people. Most cultures had a form of oral story telling which was used to pass on history (creation stories, heroic deeds) & education (moral stories, nature) as well as for entertainment. Dance, music & pictures have been used to help tell & remember stories over centuries (e.g. rock art), but now, many stories are being written down to stop them being lost in the future. Ask chn what a myth is? An ancient traditional story of gods or heroes which addresses a problem or concern of human existence. It may include an explanation of some fact or phenomenon. Tell chn a simple African myth of Anansi (the spider) collecting all the stories of the world (plan resources). Discuss briefly asking chn to remind you of parts of the story.

Easy
Work as a group to create a short play to retell the story in their own words. Adult can act as scribe to create script for each character. Use written version as prompt (plan resources). TA if available.
Medium/Hard

Chn practise retelling the story to each other in pairs. Look at the written version if necessary to prompt them or make notes, e.g. a list of key words. Remind chn to use expressive voices & faces and gestures. TD

Children can:

1. Understand what an oral story is.

2. Understand what a myth is.

Medium/Hard

3. Retell a myth orally.



Easy

4. Improvise a scene to retell a myth.



Plenary Volunteers from Medium/Hard group retell the story. Ask one chd to begin & then after a few sentences ask another to take over, and so on. If you have many volunteers, then hear the story for a second time. Then all watch the easy group drama version (reading from their script if necessary).

Week 1 Tuesday


Main focus: Write a sequel to Anansi story

6/2 Make notes when listening.

5/9 Experiment with different narrative forms to write their own stories.

6/9 Use different narrative techniques. 5&6/8 Compare how writers present stories.


Show & read chn the story of ‘How Anansi came to own all the tales that are told’ from African Myths by Gary Jeffrey (from Ashanti people of Ghana – locate on a map of Africa). Ask chn to make a note of anything they notice – it’s the same story as yesterday, but there are differences. One less creature for Anansi to catch, it is written down with pictures not told orally, the way Anansi captured the creatures is slightly different. Now read The Story Thief by Andrew Fusek Peters or Anansi & the Box of Stories by Stephen Krensky. Again chn make notes on how the story differs. Or read another version online at http://anansi-web.com/anansi.html instead. It’s a bit like the oral stories – each retelling in written form is slightly different.


Easy

Chn plan & write the story of an extra creature that Anansi had to catch to ‘buy’ the right to all the stories in the world. Which creature will it be? How will Anansi trick them & therefore catch them? TD



Medium/Hard

As Easy group, but chn plan & write the story of two other creatures that Anansi had to catch in order to ‘buy’ the right to all the stories in the world.



Children can:

1. Compare different versions of a myth.

2. Compare different narrative forms.

3. Write a sequel.



Plenary

Ask chn to tell (orally) their sequel to the story of Anansi to a partner (allow time for both stories to be told. Then ask for volunteers to retell (orally) the story they have just heard. Create a class book of the written stories.


Week 1 Wednesday


Main focus: Retell a story in written form

5/9 Experiment with different narrative forms.

6/9 Use different narrative techniques to engage & entertain the reader.

5&6/12 Handwriting.


Look again at the Anansi story in African Myths & study the layout of the story in more detail – it is like a comic strip. A lot of the text is in speech bubbles with boxes containing narrative text. Listen to an online version (found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/anansi-and-turtle-english/5798.html) of another of the Anansi stories – Anansi & Turtle. Explain that the moral of the story is a proverb ‘What goes around, comes around’. What is a proverb? A short pithy saying in common use that states a piece of advice or a general truth. Listen again to story.


Discuss the difference between speech bubbles & written dialogue. Speech marks are not used in speech bubbles nor do you need to explain who is speaking.

Easy/Medium

Chn retell the story of Anansi & Turtle in a comic/cartoon strip format, using the plan resource. (Use two or more sheets as appropriate). Write text in boxes underneath the pictures to tell the story.



Medium/Hard

As Easy/Medium group, but use speech bubbles & text boxes with the pictures to tell the story. TD



Children can:

1, Write a comic/cartoon strip.

2. Understand what a proverb is.

Medium/Hard

3. Use speech bubbles.



Plenary Read some examples of the comic strips & then display them on a large spider web.

Week 1 Thursday


Main focus: Write a playscript

5/9 Experiment with different narrative forms.

6/9 Use different narrative techniques.

5/4 Perform a scripted scene.

6/4 Devise a performance.

5&6/12 Use different styles of handwriting.


Show chn the glossary at the end of African Myths. Where are glossaries found usually? In information books. Why has one been included here? To make the book accessible to younger readers who may not understand some of the more difficult words used. Also point out the Bibliography – again where do we normally see these lists of suggested books? Information books. Why? Helpful. There is also an introduction in this book which describes the tradition of oral story telling & where the myths originate.


We briefly discussed the difference between dialogue & speech bubbles yesterday, now we are going to consider playscripts. This is another format where we write what someone says, but the layout is different again. No speech marks are used for play scripts either. Look at the initial part of the Anansi & Turtle story written as a playscript (plan resources) & identify the features of a playscript & add to plan resources.

Easy

Chn work as a group to write the story of Anansi & Turtle as a playscript. They can continue the version begun in plan resources if you wish. TD



Medium/Hard

Chn work in pairs/ threes to retell the story of Anansi & Turtle as a playscript. One chd is Anansi & the other is Turtle (plus a narrator if appropriate). They each write the script for their own character.



Children can:

1. Work collaboratively.

2. Identify the features of a playscript.

3. Write a playscript.



Plenary

Choose a grp/pair (or more) to act out their play.



Organise a KS1 class or nursery chn to visit your classroom or organise a visit to another classroom on Friday.

Week 1 Friday

Main focus: Retell a myth to younger chn

5/1 Tell a story using notes designed to cue.

6/1 Use a range of oral techniques to present engaging narratives.

6/4 Devise a performance considering how to adapt the performance for a particular audience.

5/7 Make notes on a text to explain ideas.


Read some other Anansi stories to chn, from books (see suggestions below) or online. Even better tell chn a number of other Anansi stories taken from available books or online sources. Chn make notes about the stories as they listen including the names of the characters & any moral that the story contains. Model writing a cue sheet for one of the stories to help you retell it (plan resources).

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn make themselves a cue sheet about their favourite Anansi story to help them retell it orally (plan resources). Allow chn access to books or online stories to collect forgotten facts! Explain to chn they will be retelling the myth to younger chn & must consider their audience when planning the retelling. They each then practise retelling their favourite Anansi story to a partner & then swap over. The partner gives feedback to help improve the retelling (positive criticism).

Before you go to another classroom or welcome your visitors, all chn each make a model spider (Anansi) from pipe cleaners and playdough or similar. Explain that they are going to use their Anansi to help them retell one of the Anansi stories to a younger chd. TD as req’d


Children can:

1. Make notes while listening to a story.

2. Prepare a cue sheet.

3. Retell a myth orally.

4. Evaluate their performance.


Plenary

Back in the classroom evaluate the chn’s performances. Did they enjoy telling the story to a younger chd? What responses did they get from the chn?






Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities


Outcomes

You will need African Myths by Gary Jeffrey & illustrated by Terry Riley, ISBN: 9781905087860 and African Legends, Myths and Folktales by Anthony D. Fredericks, ISBN: 9781591586333. Have a range of books of African myths available for chn to read during quiet reading time- they need to experience a range of different African myths and stories.

Week 2 Monday


Main focus: Retelling myths as a short play.

5/8 Compare how one theme is presented in diff media.

6/8 Compare how different writers present stories.

5/1 Tell a story using script.

6/1 Use a range of oral techniques to present engaging narratives.

5/4 Perform a scripted scene.


Some African myths explain how animals became how they are. Read The Story of Dog and Jackal from African Myths, which explains how dogs became domestic pets rather than wild animals (from Bushongo people of Zaire: find on Africa map). Organise 8 chn to read parts of The Cat who came Indoors from African Legends, Myths and Folktales by Anthony D. Fredericks (you need to photocopy pages in advance & highlight parts for diff speakers – plan resources). This story is from Zimbabwe – locate on the map. Show rest of class the layout of the story. How does the layout differ from The story of Dog and Jackal? It is a playscript not a comic strip. Point out that this book also has an introduction, notes about African countries the myths originate from, and an index (again more like an information book). There are many other stories in this book – photocopy some of them that involve animals (with relevant nos of characters - & copies - for the different groups in the class).

Easy

Give grp photocopies of one of the stories from African Legends, Myths and Folktales. They choose a part each, highlight their part on one of the photocopies & rehearse telling the story. TA
Medium/Hard

Divide chn into mixed ability groups containing the relevant number of characters & give each grp photocopies of a different story from African Legends, Myths and Folktales. Chn learn their parts & rehearse telling the stories without their photocopies. Remind chn that when re-telling a story orally it doesn’t have to be word perfect, as every oral retelling differs. TD

Children can:

1. Compare layout of different texts.

2. Rehearse & retell a myth as a scene.

Plenary
Give each group the opportunity to tell their African myth to the rest of the class. Locate the countries that these stories originate from on the map of Africa.

Week 2 Tuesday


Main focus: Create a mythical monster

6/10 Use varied structures to shape & organise text coherently.

5/10 Experiment with the order of sections to achieve different effects.

Some African myths are about monsters – mythical creatures. Read an example told by the Ashanti people of Ghana (locate on map) – The Monster Sasabonsam versus the Wonder Child from Traditional Stories from West Africa by Robert Hull. Before telling the story, explain how the Ashanti story tellers often started by saying, ’Now this story – I didn’t make it up’ & the audience replies ‘Who did then?’ At the end the story-teller says, ‘Now that is my story - & whether it is sweet or not sweet, take a bit of it & keep the rest under your pillow.’ Afterwards read the description of Sasbonsam in plan resources. Ask chn to give their opinion on whether or not he is a convincing monster!


Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn draw their own mythical monster. Be as imaginative as possible. Annotate the picture using adjectives (& adverbs if describing how it moves or breathes for example). Name their monster too. Hard group write a short paragraph describing their monster instead.



Children can:

1. Create a mythical monster.



Easy/Medium

2. Annotate their mythical monster drawing.



Hard

3. Write a paragraph describing their mythical monster.



Plenary

Share their monsters! Create a display of monsters.


Week 2 Wednesday


Main focus: Compare myths

5/8 Compare how common theme is presented in different media.

6/8 Compare how different writers present experiences.

5/7Use evidence from across a text.


Read two stories about death: Down to Deadtown, a Yoruba (Nigerian tribe – locate Nigeria on map) myth about ghosts, from Traditional Stories from West Africa. Follow this immediately by reading Marwe: Into the Land of the Dead: An East African Legend by Marie P. Croall (see booklist). Explain that we are going to compare these two stories. Chn need to consider the layout, the actual story, the characters, the setting, etc. Finally they decide which they prefer. Lots of stories have been written about death & many cultures have ‘lands of the dead’, e.g. the Ancient Greeks had the land of the dead in the Underworld ruled over by the god Hades, and the Romans have the River Styx as the entrance to their land of the dead & Charon the ferryman was paid to row them there.


Easy/Medium

Compare the two stories & then explain which they prefer & why.



Hard

Write a comparison of the two stories and explain which they prefer & why.

TD


Children can:

1. Compare two myths.

2. Use evidence from the texts to explain their preferences.


Plenary

Volunteers explain their preference using evidence from their comparison.


Week 2 Thursday


Main focus: Retell a myth in their chosen format

6/2 Make notes when listening for a sustained period.

5/7 Make notes on a text.

5/1 Tell a story using notes.

6/1 Use a range of oral techniques to present engaging narratives.

5/9 Experiment with different narrative forms.

6/9 Use different narrative techniques to engage & entertain the reader.

6/10 Use varied structures to shape & organise text coherently


Read two version of the creation story of the Yoruba people from Nigeria (locate on map of Africa) – The Story of Creation from African Myths and The Coming of Night: A Yoruba Creation Myth from West Africa by James Riordan & Jenny Stow. Chn should make notes as they listen. Discuss how the two versions of the story compare – content, layout, etc. Read another creation story from another part of Africa - The Star Bearer: A Creation myth from Ancient Egypt by Dianne Hofmeyr & Jude Daly (locate Egypt on the map). Again chn should make notes as they listen. These stories include gods – another common sort of character in African myths, and they attempt to explain some of the mysteries of the people’s worlds.


Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn work in pairs to retell one of the creation stories in the format of their choice using the notes they took. Write the character names on the f/c. It could be an oral retelling, in which case they need to rehearse as a pair, each telling different parts of the story, or as a comic/cartoon strip or a playscript. For oral retelling the pair will need to write notes as cues. TD as req’d.



Children can:

1. Make notes while listening to a myth.

2. Compare different versions of a myth.

3. Retell a myth in their chosen format.




Plenary

Ask for volunteers to retell the creation story either orally or reading their written version.


Week 2 Friday


Main focus: Write a book review

5/8 Reflect on reading preferences.

6/8 Discuss personal reading with others.

6/9 In non-narrative, establish viewpoints.

5/9 Develop viewpoint by selection of detail.

We have heard & seen lots of different African myths, but which did chn enjoy the most? Remind chn briefly of those shared in class & point out the books which have been available for them to read individually. Read some sample book reviews - from the back of books, from Amazon or from magazines, etc (preferably of some myth books). Why do people write & read book reviews? Book reviews can encourage other people to buy the books or borrow them from the library, so the authors & publishers approve! Reading book reviews can introduce you to an author or book that you were not aware of, can give you ideas for presents for other people, can widen your own reading experience, etc.


Easy/Medium/Hard

Write a story/book review of their favourite African myth. It could be one that they have heard in the class sessions or one that they have read by themselves. Use the differentiated plan resources. TD as req’d



    Children can:

    1. Appreciate why book reviews are useful.

    2. Write a story/book review.


Plenary

Volunteers explain which story they have chosen and why, using their review as a prompt.








Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities


Outcomes

Week 3 Monday


Main focus: Plan own African myth

5/9 Experiment with different narrative forms to write their own stories.

6/9 Set their own challenges to extend achievement and experience in writing.

Watch the BBC video about African Myths & Legends (see website list below). This will act as an inspiration for chn to write their own African myth or legend. Did chn enjoy watching the video? Go through video again, pausing at some questions & give chn the opportunity to answer them. Finally watch the whole video straight through again. Do chn feel inspired? Explain that over the next few days they are going to write their own myth about Africa. They can write it in the style of one of the myths they have heard or read during the last two weeks. Pose a few questions to stimulate ideas. Will their main character be a person or an African animal? What will be the setting for their myth? Will the myth have a moral? Or will it explain a natural phenomenon or how an animal became the shape it is? Perhaps it will be a story about creatures lurking in a forest, a cave or in a river.

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn begin to plan their Africa myth using the planning sheet or story board (plan resources). Remind chn not to include too many characters, to think about the setting(s) for their story & to plan an outline of the plot. TD as required

Children can:

1. Take inspiration from a video.

2. Plan their own myth.

Plenary
Volunteers describe the ideas they have for their story. Other chn can offer positive feedback or ask questions to help clarify the story outline for the author.

Week 3 Tuesday


Main focus: Describing the main character(s) in their myth

6/9 Use different narrative techniques to write a story.

5/9 Experiment with different narrative forms to write their own stories.

Today we are going to concentrate on our character(s). Suggest that chn have one or, at most two, main characters. They may decide to have only two characters altogether. How can we make a character come alive in a story? Ask chn for ideas & list on f/c. Draw out that we can describe them, show by the reactions of other people what their personality is like, show by their own words or actions what their personality is like, include illustrations, etc. Descriptive writing requires the use of adjectives (describe nouns) & adverbs (describe how something is done) to show how a character looks & acts. We also want to use powerful verbs to help readers picture what is happening when our character does something. For dialogue, what punctuation is needed? Speech marks & commas &/or full stops. Model writing speech by a character chn have met in a myth during the last two weeks.


Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn draw their main character(s) in the centre of a page. Around them write details in note form about the character – including appearance, personality, name, age (if relevant), special powers (if any), and relationship with other character(s) in the story. Remember they are African, whether an animal or a person. TD as required



Chn can:

1. Understand how a character can be brought alive in a story.

2. Annotate a character drawing.


Plenary

Show samples of chn’s work – highlighting details that give a good idea of the character.


Week 3 Wednesday


Main focus: Write opening for their myth

5/9 Vary the pace through the use of direct & reported speech, portrayal of action & selection of detail.

6/9 Select words & language drawing on know-ledge of literacy features.

5&6/11 Punctuate sentences accurately to clarify, using speech marks.


The opening of the story is very important because the reader has to be ‘hooked’. The reader should want to find out more, to want to carry on reading. Usually the main character(s) is/are introduced and the setting described. Openings for stories can be of three main types: Dialogue (usually involving the main character), Action (use powerful verbs to describe the main character doing something unexpected, dangerous, exciting, etc) or Description (describe the setting, the character, the situation) – discuss how these differ. Myths however, often begin with a sentence that indicates that the story happened a long time ago; use the openings in African Folk Tales or African Myths as examples of this. The main character(s) is/are introduced too & often the setting described. Look at the generic ‘opening checklist’ (plan resources) & discuss which features are typical of the myth genre. Could show chn the BBC planning tool.


Explain to/ remind chn of the difference between direct & reported speech. They may wish to use either or both in their myth. Model writing both, reminding chn of punctuation, esp speech marks.

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn write the opening for their myth. They can use the opening checklist to remind them of features. Share with a partner & use ‘3 Stars and a Wish’ (plan resources) to give feedback. Edit & redraft as necessary & then continue writing their myth if time allows.



Children can:

1. Recognise features used in story openings.

2. Write an opening for a myth.

3. Recognise & use direct & reported speech.



Plenary

Share some good examples of openings – tick off features on opening checklist.


Week 3 Thursday


Main focus: Finish the first draft of their myth

6/9 Select words & language drawing on know-ledge of literacy features.

5/9 Experiment with different narrative forms to write their own stories.


Discuss how the ending of a story is also important. Can chn suggest what it should achieve? Objectives might include:

  • it has to resolve or explain some unanswered questions

  • characters are rewarded or punished for their behaviour in the story

  • what appeared to be dangerous or menacing turns out to be harmless
  • most story endings conform to their genre e.g. myth – the good character succeeds or is rewarded & the bad characters are punished, or the moral is explained


  • characters discover solutions to problems

  • calm or order is restored

  • characters learn a lesson

  • character’s reaction is described

  • use powerful verbs & describing words (adjectives/adverbs)

Explain that chn should aim to finish the first draft of their myths today.

Easy/Medium/Hard

Look again at their planned ending. Does it achieve one or more of the objectives discussed? Chn continue writing their myth finishing with a super ending! Remind chn that myths are usually quite short stories.



Children can:

1. Identify some features of good story endings.

2. Include a moral in their myth.


Plenary

Have any chn included a moral in their story? Share their ideas. Remind chn of Aesop’s Fables & how they have morals. Read some of these (plan resources)


Week 3 Friday


Main focus: Present their written myths

5/9 Reflect independently and critically on their own writing & edit & improve it.

5/10 Experiment with the order of sections & paragraphs to achieve different effects.

6/10 Use paragraphs to achieve pace and emphasis.

6/3 Understand & use a variety of ways to criticise constructively.

5&6/12 Use ICT to present work.

6/9 Integrate words & images imaginatively for different purposes.

6/6 Correct spelling in their own work.

It is important when we are writing for an audience that we present it well. Not only do we want our story to grab the reader’s attention & keep their interest right through to the ending, we also want to make it easy for them to read. It helps if we use accurate spelling, correct punctuation & arrange the work in paragraphs. When do we use a new paragraph? A change of place, a change in time, a change of focus or a change of speaker in a piece of dialogue. Show chn a simple myth text & ask why a new paragraph has been used on each occasion. The handwriting should be clear & legible or word processing can be used. Remind chn that we can help each other improve our writing by offering constructive criticism.


Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn check their own writing, editing as they read it. Check it makes sense, but also look at spellings, punctuation & paragraphs. All of these help the reader to read the story more easily. Use ‘3 stars and a Wish’ with a response partner again. Redraft as necessary. Write out or word process their final version. Share their story with another chd once they have finished. They may wish to add one or more illustrations.



    Children can:

    1. Check & edit their own work.

    2. Use legible, clear handwriting.

    3. Use ICT to present their work.

    4. Illustrate their work.


Plenary

Create a class book of ‘African’ myths. Read out some elected myths written by the chn. Perhaps they could be included on the school’s website?



Scroll down for success criteria and book & website lists

Success criteria for the plan – these should be selected & adjusted to match the specific needs of the class being taught.

Easy


Medium

Hard

  • Understand what an oral story is

  • Understand what a myth is

  • Improvise a scene to retell a myth

  • Compare different versions of a myth

  • Write a sequel with support

  • Begin to understand what a proverb is

  • With support, identify the features of a playscript

  • With support, write a short playscript

  • Make some notes while listening to a story

  • With support, prepare a cue sheet

  • Evaluate their performance

  • Compare layout of different texts

  • Rehearse and retell a myth in a scene

  • Create a mythical monster

  • Compare two myths

  • With support, use evidence from the texts to explain their preferences

  • Begin to appreciate why book reviews are useful

  • Write a story/book review

  • With support, plan and write their own myth

  • With support, understand how a character can be brought alive in a story

  • Annotate a character drawing

  • Recognise some of the features of good story openings and endings

  • Begin to recognise direct and reported speech

  • With support, include a moral in their myth

  • Check and begin to edit their own work

  • Use legible, clear handwriting

  • Use ICT to present their work

  • Illustrate their work

  • Understand what an oral story is

  • Understand what a myth is

  • Retell a myth orally

  • Compare different versions of a myth


  • Write a sequel

  • Understand what a proverb is

  • Identify the features of a playscript

  • Write a playscript

  • Make notes while listening to a story

  • Prepare a cue sheet

  • Evaluate their performance

  • Compare layout of different texts

  • Rehearse and retell a myth in a scene

  • Create a mythical monster

  • Compare two myths

  • Use evidence from the texts to explain their preferences

  • Appreciate why book reviews are useful

  • Write a story/book review

  • Plan and write their own myth

  • Begin to understand how a character can be brought alive in a story

  • Annotate a character drawing

  • Begin to recognise features used in good story openings and endings

  • Begin to recognise and use direct and reported speech

  • Try to include a moral in their myth

  • Check and edit their own work

  • Use legible, clear handwriting

  • Use ICT to present their work

  • Illustrate their work

  • Understand what an oral story is

  • Understand what a myth is

  • Retell a myth orally

  • Compare different versions of a myth

  • Write a sequel

  • Understand what a proverb is

  • Identify the features of a playscript

  • Write a playscript

  • Make notes while listening to a story

  • Prepare a cue sheet

  • Evaluate their performance

  • Compare layout of different texts

  • Rehearse and retell a myth in a scene

  • Create a mythical monster

  • Compare two myths
  • Use evidence from the texts to explain their preferences


  • Appreciate why book reviews are useful

  • Write a story/book review

  • Plan and write their own myth

  • Understand how a character can be brought alive in a story

  • Annotate a character drawing

  • Identify features used in good story openings and endings

  • Recognise and use direct and reported speech

  • Include a moral in their myth

  • Check and edit their own work

  • Use legible, clear handwriting

  • Use ICT to present their work

  • Illustrate their work


Books: We have really tried to keep what is essential to a minimum – but you do need the top three books which can be bought from Amazon’s new/nearly new category at the prices indicated (correct on publication date). ** indicates that the book is basically essential, * that it is VERY helpful.

** African Myths by Gary Jeffrey & illustrated by Terry Riley (Book House, ISBN: 9781905087860 6.29 new or £1.99 used/new))

** Traditional Stories from West Africa by Robert Hull (Wayland, ISBN: 9780750249539 includes Anansi and Hate-to-be-Contradicted story 6.29 or new/used from £2.09))

** Marwe: Into the Land of the Dead: An East African Legend by Marie P. Croall (Lerner Publishing, ISBN: 978-0822585145 2.09 used/new) )

* The Coming of Night: A Yoruba Creation Myth from West Africa by James Riordan & Jenny Stow ( Francis Lincoln, ISBN: 978-0711213784 5.39 or £1.44 used/new))

* The Star Bearer: A Creation myth from Ancient Egypt by Dianne Hofmeyr & Jude Daly (Francis Lincoln, ISBN: 978-1845078386 5.24 or £2 used/new))


* African Legends, Myths and Folktales by Anthony D. Fredericks (Teachers ideas Press, ISBN: 9781591586333 includes Anansi’s fishing Expedition 13.45 new or £6.50 second hand))

African Myths and Folk Tales by Carter Godwin Woodson (Dover Publications Ltd, ISBN: 978-0486477343 £2.99)

The Story Thief by Andrew Fusek Peters (A & C Black Publishers Ltd, ISBN: 978-0713684216)

Anansi and the Box of Stories: A West African Folktale (On My Own Folklore) by Stephen Krensky (First Avenue Editions, ISBN: 978-0822567455)

Anansi Does the Impossible! by Verna Aardema (Aladdin Paperbacks, ISBN: 978-0689839337 Another version how Anansi got all the stories in the world)

Anansi and the Pot of Beans by Bobby & Sherry Norfolk (August House Publishers, ISBN: 978-0874838114)

Anansi Goes to Lunch by Sherry Norfolk (August House Publishers, ISBN: 978-0874838527)


Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock by Eric A. Kimmel (Holiday House, ISBN: 978-0823407989)

The Adventures of Spider: West African Folktales by Joyce Cooper Arkhurst (Little Brown Books for Young Readers, ISBN: 978-0316051071)

African Folk Tales by Hugh Vernon-Jackson (Dover Publications Inc, ISBN: 9780486405537)

Nelson Mandela’s Favourite African Folktales by Nelson Mandela (Hachette Audio, ISBN: 978-1600246661)


Bringing the Rain to Kapiti Plain by Verna Aardema ISBN: 978-0333351642

Tales from Africa (Oxford Myths and Legends) by Kathleen Arnott ISBN: 978-0192750792

The Clever Monkey: A Folktale from West Africa by Rob Cleveland & Baird Hoffmire ISBN: 978-0874838015

Folktales from Africa: The Girl who Married a Lion by Alexander McCall Smith ISBN: 978-1841957296

Yoruba Legends by M. I. Ogumefu ISBN: 978-1605060170

Folktales from Africa: The Baboons who went This Way and That by Alexander McCall Smith ISBN: 978-1841957722
Websites:

http://anansi-web.com/anansi.html The story of Anansi (optional version)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/anansi-and-turtle-english/5798.html Delightful cartoon version of Anansi & Turtle story

http://africa.mrdonn.org/fables.html Various African myths including an Anansi story

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdsvvHpAGQc, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sau3E2LEfcI, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zG9eknk6mqw, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lD8Qlbqhw5Q Various Anansi myths are available on YouTube

http://heinemannvideogallery.wordpress.com/ An inspirational video to encourage chn to write their own African myth or legend

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvbOXPVLJ_s The same video is also available here & can be downloaded

The links to the websites and the contents of the web pages associated with such links specified on this list (hereafter collectively referred to as the ‘Links’) have been checked by Hamilton Trust and to the best of Hamilton Trust’s knowledge, are correct and accurate at the time of publication. Notwithstanding the foregoing or any other terms and conditions on the Hamilton Trust website, you acknowledge that Hamilton Trust has no control over such Links and indeed, the owners of such Links may have removed such Links, changed such Links and/or contents associated with such Links. Therefore, it is your sole responsibility to verify any of the Links which you wish you use. Hamilton Trust excludes all responsibility and liability for any loss or damage arising from the use of any Links.


© Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y5/6 AF N Plan 3 – Weeks 6-8



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