Year 9 Writing Task – Horror Story Genre

:)


Download 44.08 Kb.
Date conversion27.12.2016
Size44.08 Kb.
Year 9 Writing Task – Horror Story

Genre: A short story (Narrative) written to SCARE the reader. The writer uses descriptive language and imagery and techniques (such as building suspense or tension or leaving details to the reader’s imagination) to stimulate the reader’s imagination. Making them believe what they fear could be real…
Your Task: You are to write a short horror story that includes many of the traditional elements that you would expect to find in a scary story, such as:


  • The language of horror (example: eerie, blood-curdling and terrifying)

  • The building of suspense to create suspense and reader engagement

  • Carefully detailed archetypes (example: Dracula, serial killer or ghost type), or

  • Unique and unusual characters

  • Shocking events or unexpected twists that the reader could not possibly predict

  • Descriptive words that create a sensory experience

  • An ending that may leave the reader feeling uncomfortable, that the story could be true…


Story length: 600 - 800 words
Task Criteria:

  • Appropriate story structure (introduction, conflict and resolution)

  • Sentences and paragraphing

  • Punctuation and spelling

  • Consistency of tense

  • Genre representation (language use and vocabulary)

  • Characterisation

  • Audience awareness – positioning the reader (scare factor!!)

  • Creativity – quality of writing

Real photo taken – The brown lady (1936)


Preparation


  1. Decide on the plot of the story (based on – own ideas, movie, real story, nightmare etc).

  2. Decide on location for setting and create the ‘context’ of the story – Is it set in the past? In a particular country? Is the story a consequence of past events? What social, cultural and environmental factors will be included to make your story authentic?

  3. Decide of the number and ‘types’ of characters.


Develop your plot

  1. Decide the ‘main action’ for the story – (Examples: accident, murder, an escape, a meeting etc)

  2. Create the ‘scene’ – the environmental or atmospheric elements that make the story scary (example: an abandoned farm house in the middle of a cold, snowy night)

  3. A strong ending for resolution – needs to be satisfying for the reader, so they are not left asking questions


Important things to consider

  • Plan it out – in point form, in the order they should go

  • Take care of details – your reader needs to see, hear and experience what you intended them to!

  • Write, write, write your draft – get into the flow of writing to capture your ideas

  • Keep track of your characters – there needs to be resolution for all characters

  • Edit – proof read your own work for errors and improvements

  • Get someone else to read your story – have you succeeded in scaring the reader?

  • Redraft – for an improved results and final piece of writing


A few useful Websites:

http://horror.fictionfactor.com/
http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Horror-Story
http://www.spinetinglers.co.uk/

Year 9 English Writing

Creative Writing – Horror Story


SKILLS

4.75

5.0


5.25

5.5


control of writing texts in various forms, including narratives, reports, explanations, procedures and persuasive texts

produce, in print and electronic forms, texts for a variety of purposes, including speculating, hypothesising, persuading and reflecting

composition of sustained narratives with some control of main plot and sub-plots and consistent character development

expression of thoughts, feelings, opinions and ideas

composition of imaginative and informative texts presenting challenging ideas and issues

write extended narratives or scripts

use of writing to explore complex issues and POV

use of writing to explore complex issues and to argue for a particular point of view




appropriate use of figurative language to achieve particular effects

write arguments, reports, personal reflections on, or evaluations of, texts

use of a variety of language techniques to present an argument and influence audiences to share a POV

integration of complex ideas and multiple perspectives




strategic use of headings, subheadings, graphics, photographs and art work to support the text

improve the accuracy and readability of their writing

effective use of vocabulary and sentence structures appropriate to the intended purpose of the text

the written conventions, structures and features appropriate for a range of different text types




use of a variety of software packages to plan, organise, revise and present electronic texts

use a range of punctuation to support meaning

effective use of strategies for redrafting, editing for audience appropriateness, prioritising and sequencing ideas

proofreading and redrafting for accuracy, clarity, coherence and consistency of style




control tenses and accurately identify and use speech











edit their writing for clarity, coherence and consistency of style, and proofread and correct spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.









Task Criteria

VL

L

M

H

VH

Appropriate structure – Intro, conflict & Resolution

VL

L

M

H

VH

Sentences and paragraphing

VL

L

M

H

VH

Punctuation and spelling

VL

L

M

H

VH

Consistency of tense

VL

L

M

H


VH

Genre Representation (Language use and vocabulary)

VL

L

M

H

VH

Characterisation

VL

L

M

H

VH

Audience awareness – positioning the reader

VL

L

M

H

VH

Creativity – quality of writing

VL

L

M

H

VH
Name: _________________________________
Overall result: _____
Comments: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


: files -> 2011
2011 -> Introduction
2011 -> Story Form Have a story to share with the York community? Want to promote an upcoming event? Highlight your current research? Tell us about an exciting university-community initiative or an outstanding alumnus/or student?
2011 -> Arizona Academic Standards in the Arts: Articulated for First Grade
2011 -> Books Pig Boy by Gerald McDermott Hina and the Sea of Stars by Michael Nordenstrom The Shark God by Rafe Martin Punia and the King of Sharks by Lee Wardlaw
2011 -> Product Quality Risk Perceptions and Decisions: Contaminated Pet Food and Lead-Painted Toys Tianjun Feng
2011 -> Math in Fashion: Sample Related End-of-Course (eoc) Questions
2011 -> The Minister’s Black Veil Allegory
2011 -> Curriculum vitae
2011 -> Contacts: Ashley Berke Lauren Saul
2011 -> 21 January 2011, as XLV (2011)


:)


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page

:)