Acquisition Lesson Plan for the Concept, Topic or Skill Not for the Day Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept



Download 66.5 Kb.
Date23.11.2016
Size66.5 Kb.



Acquisition Lesson

Plan for the Concept, Topic or Skill---Not for the Day

Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept: Retelling familiar stories that include key details

Acquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and assessment to differentiate learning. Differentiation is italicized within the lesson.
Author Name(s): Bonnie Albertson and Patti Bunting, University of Delaware

Grade: Kindergarten Time Frame: 3 days

Pre-requisite(s):

Students have drawn pictures and explained or written about their favorite part of a story read to them by the teacher.

Students are familiar with making predictions based on picture clues.

Students are familiar with the concept of graphic organizer.

Students are familiar with identifying the title and topic of a book, with prompting and support.

Students have been introduced to the idea that there are fiction and informational texts.



Common Core Standard(s): RL.K.2 -With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.

Essential Question:

How can we retell a story that includes key details?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?
Assessment Prompt (AP) #1: With prompting and support, the students will identify the key details after a story has been read to them.

Assessment Prompt #2: With prompting and support, the students will retell the story that includes key details.

Assessment Prompt #3: With prompting and support, the students will retell a different story that includes key details.

Activating Strategy (Day 1): Teacher displays cover of an age appropriate story book with pictures (preferably a big book). Teacher asks, “What do you think this book is about?" "How do you know?" Students should mention the title and picture. “By looking at the picture, can you tell me what this book may be about?” “The title is ______. What do you think this book is about?” Tell students, "those are excellent predictions based on the clues from looking at the cover of the book. Now let’s think about a story that might go along with this book. Can you tell a story? What do you think the words might say? “1’s tell 2’s your story.” “2’s tell 1’s your story.” “I think the story might go something like this ________.” “Now let’s listen to the story.” Teacher reads book to students, pausing to allow students to view the pictures.

Were there any similarities between your story and the actual story? How was your story different?”


Key Vocabulary Words to Preview:

retell, key details, important



Teaching Strategies:


Graphic Organizer: Key Details (Attachment 1)



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instruction (Day 1): "Our Essential Question is: How can we retell a story that includes key details?” (Display the EQ.) “We are going to be key detail detectives today. Key details are the most important parts of the story.”

If the students need background knowledge in understanding “most important parts,” have them brainstorm the most important parts (key details) of their school day. “Let’s think about our day at school. What are the important parts or ‘key details’ of our day? One of the first things we do each day is to go to breakfast. That is an important part of our day. What else do we do that is an important part of our school day?” Teacher makes a list of the “Important Parts/Key Details of Our Day at School.”

Teacher thinks aloud on the first page of the story by saying, “I think that the key detail on this page is ______________ because it is very important. The story would not make sense – or might mean something totally different – if the detail wasn’t there. I am going to write/draw this on our Key Details graphic organizer. ”


AP #1: Then, the teacher stops on pages with key details and says, “talk to your partner about the key detail(s) on this page. How did you know? Did you see it in the picture or did you hear that in the story?" Teacher makes a list of what the students suggest on a graphic organizer (similar to the one attached) by writing and/or drawing pictures.


Instruction: Teacher reviews the list at the end of the story. "What you told me are the key details from the story. Key details are the most important parts of a story.”

Summarizer: “Tell your partner one of the key details from our story from today.”



Instruction (Day 2): The teacher asks the students to recall key details from the story read to them the day before. Then the teacher does a think aloud by saying, “I am not going to read the book today but I am going to retell the story to you. I wonder if I should include the key details on our graphic organizer. Let me try it…..”

AP#2: Once the story is finished, the teacher tells the students to retell the story to their partner using the key details on the graphic organizer. Each partner takes a turn to retell the story.

Students that are already reading may be able to identify more key details in a story.

Students that are struggling with comprehension may benefit from hearing a shorter (less detailed story) or very familiar story.

To scaffold, the teacher may want to provide one key detail on the organizer to help students understand the concept of key details.

Prompting and support should be given to the students as stated in the standard.

Instruction (Day 3): Teacher introduces a different picture book and reviews what key details are before reading to the class.

AP#3: Students tell about the key details as the teacher records them on the graphic organizer.

Then the teacher gives the students an opportunity to retell the story to the class or to a partner.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Summarizing/Assignment Strategy:

Student draws/writes key details (Attachment 1) and retells a story of their choice. It is most important to assess what the child says-not the drawings. Students need prompting and support when needed, as stated in the standard.



Attachment 1

EQ: How can we retell a story that includes key details?
Title of the Book:
__________________________________________________________________________________
Topic:
__________________________________________________________________________________

Key Details
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________

Summarizing Strategy: Retelling a story using Key Details

Directions: Have students make a foldable by folding paper into 3 (or four) parts. Student draws 3 (or 4) details from a story and retells the story. Teacher may need to model this process before assigning the task. Some students may need to use the back of their foldable if they are able to give more than 3 or 4 key details. Students who are able to write should be given the opportunity to write about their key details. Prompting and support should be given to the students as stated in the standard.




Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).



Share with your friends:


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2019
send message

    Main page