*For each of the questions below, ask students to support their answer with evidence from the text. Reading Literature Standards: rl2



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2nd Grade- Sample Questions/Prompts


*For each of the questions below, ask students to support their answer with evidence from the text.
Reading Literature Standards:

RL2: Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.


  • Teach the students Frist, Next, Last. Ask students to tell the key events from the story using those words.

  • Have students use the words, first, second, third, to tell the key events from a story.

  • After reading the story, ask students to retell the story, and to describe the moral of the story in their own words.

  • What is one important lesson that was learned in this story?

  • What moral or lesson can you learn from this story?

  • What lesson can be learned from this story?

  • What do you think is the message, or moral, of this story?

  • Think about the story events? What lesson did _____learn?

  • What lesson does_____ learn?

  • Summarize the story.

  • Use the important details from the story to retell what happened.

  • What lesson do you think _____learned?

  • What lesson do you think the author is trying to tell?

  • Remind students about what a moral of the story means. Through a class discussion, have students determine the moral of this story.

  • What happened first? Next? Finally?

  • What do you think____ learns at the end of the story?

  • What are the most important events in the story? In what order do the events take place?

  • What lesson can I learn from the characters at the end of the story?
  • What can you learn from reading a fable? Fairytale? Folktale?


  • What lesson can readers learn from the way this story ends?

  • What are the main events in this story?

  • What happens in this [story]? What is the central message?

    1. What happens in this [story]? What does the author hope the reader learns from the [story]?

    2. What happens in this [story]? What [lesson does Jose learn in the story]?

    3. What happens in this [folktale]? What lesson does this [folktale teach]?

  • What happens in this [fable]? What is the moral of this [fable]?


RL3: Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

  • For each character list the event, and words, thoughts, or actions.

  • Why does (character)start to feel ____?

  • How does (character) act after (event)? Why do you think the _______ reacts this way?

  • How does _____change by the end of the story?

  • How does (character)feel at the beginning of the story? How does _____feel at the end of the story?

  • How are ____’s actions different at the beginning of the story than his/her actions at the middle and end of the story?

  • How does ___ act at the end of the story? What does this tell you about him/her?

  • Why do you think (character) isn’t angry when _____happens?

  • How does ______react when ______happens?

  • How does _____feel when _____happens? How do you know?

  • How do the characters react when they hear about_______?

  • What clues in the text tell us that (character) is ________?

  • Why do you think _____(the character) decides to ________?
  • How does (the character) feel when (event that happens)?


  • What does (character) do when (event that happens)? Based on what you know about (character) why do you think this happens?

  • Why do/does(character(s)) (action)? What does (character) realize when he/she sees this?

  • What is ____’s attitude towards _______? How do you know?

  • How do you think (character) feels about ______now?

  • What word(s ) describe the character’s feelings at this point in the story?

  • How did (an event) change the life of (character)?

  • What can you tell about (character) based on how he/she (action)?

  • Why [does the boy smile]?

• How [does the[girl feel when she learns what happened]?

• What [does the dog do to find his owner]?



• How [does the main character change during the story]?




RL4: Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.


  • Identify the words that are repeated in the poem.

  • Point out that an action was repeated ___ times in the story, what action was repeated?

  • What effect does the repetition of words have?

  • What words and phrases does the author repeat?

  • What does (character) mean when he/she says (quote)?

  • What clues in the text help you understand the meaning of the word____?

  • Listen to the rhythm and repetition of the words. How do the words give the poem a rhythm, or beat and help you understand the meaning?
  • Comparing poems… Which poems use repeated words to help the reader understand what the author wants to say? Which use rhythm? Do any use rhyme?


  • What lines repeat?

  • What word in the text tells you how (character) feels about (topic)?

  • The author repeats the phrase: (quote)… How does that help you picture what happens?

  • How did the author use words and rhythm in this selection?

  • Why did the author use sound words in this story?

  • Authors sometimes use words that sound like noises to make a story seem real. Where in the story can you find examples of words that sound like an animal or object?

  • The author uses capital letters for some words. How would you read these words differently? Why does the author use capital letters for these words?

  • How do the words and phrases in the poem give it rhythm?

  • Why did the author use the word_____ instead of the word____?

  • The author uses many colorful verbs in this story. How does this help you picture what is happening?

  • What does it mean to (quote)?

  • How does the author describe___? Why do you think the author makes this comparison?

  • How do the repeated words add rhythm and meaning to the story?

  • How does the plot of (selection title) fit the saying (idiomatic expression)?


RL 5 Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.


  • How did the author begin the story?

  • How does the ending of the story solve the problem from the beginning of the story?

  • How does the beginning of the story share the main problem?

  • How is the problem solved at the end of the story?

  • What happens at the beginning of the story that gives you a clue about the end?


  • What has changed by the end of the story?

  • What does the author want to help you understand at the beginning of the story?

  • What does the author want to help you understand at the end of the story?

  • What happens to (character) at the end of the story?

  • Tell students authors sometime use flashbacks to take readers back to an earlier time in order to explain what is happening in the present. What words in the ______ sentence on page _____ signal that the author is talking about an earlier time?

  • Use the words first, next, and last to tell the sequence of the events.

  • Think about the action or events that take place at the beginning of the story, the middle, an finally the end of the story.

  • What is the problem at the beginning of the story? What events or character’s actions solve the problem?

  • What problem did the author present at the beginning of the story?

  • In the story __________ how does _________ ( character) solve the problem?

  • Ask students to retell or summarize the important events in the story they read. Consider using a graphic organizer while you read record key events to reflect the beginning, middle, and end of the story.

  • What happens at the end of the story?

  • What happens in the middle of the story?

  • As you listen to the story listen for details about the characters, the setting, and the events that happen at the beginning, middle and end of the story.

  • In the middle of the story, how does________________________?


RL 6 Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.


  • When you are reading the character’s words, think about how he or she might feel about what is happening.

  • Ask students to read the part of a character in the story using the voice they think the character should have.

  • How do you think (character) feels about what is happening in the story?

  • Read the character voices aloud and use your voice to show each character’s point of view.

  • How do (character’s) feeling about _________seem different from (character’s) feelings about _________?

  • How is (character’s) point of view different from (character’s) point of view?

  • From the point of view of (character) which is better?

  • What words on page __________ give you clues to the point of view of ___________?

  • Working with a partner, reread pages ____________. Tell your partner what ____________ thinks or feels about _______________________.

  • How does [Lawanda] feel about the trip? How is that different from how her brother feels?

    • How does [Frank] feel about getting a new dog? How is that different from how his mother feels?

    • Read a portion of the story aloud using a different voice for each character.



RL 7 Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

  • How do the words and pictures make__________?

  • How do the illustrations on page____ show you______?
  • What clues in the illustrations on page_____ help you understand the meaning of the word ___?


  • How does the author use the illustration on page ____ to help you understand____?

  • How do the words and illustration on page____ show you_____?

  • How do the pictures and words work together on these pages?

  • Looking at a picture: What is happening in the picture? What details show you this? What conclusions can you draw?

  • How do the photos and captions help you learn more about _____?

  • How does the picture on page ____ show the same details that the text tells?

  • What do you learn from the picture?

  • How do the illustrations help you understand the characters in the story? Point to the picture to give an example.

  • What clues does the picture give you about when and where the story takes place?

  • The text says _______. How do the illustrations help you understand what the text means?

  • How does the picture on page____ go along with the text on that page?

  • What is (character) doing on page___? What part of the picture tells you this?

  • Look at the picture on page______. How do you think (character) feels?

  • How does the illustration relate to what is going on in the story?

  • Have students note describe the picture, list the page number and state the purpose of the picture in a graphic organizer.

  • Use words and pictures to complete a graphic organizer with the following headings: Character, What Happens, Words, Thoughts, Actions.

  • Use the illustrations on page____ to figure out _____.

  • What clues about (character) do you find in the words and pictures on page_____?

  • What does the illustration on page _____ show?

  • What clues do the words and pictures give you about the setting?

  • How do the pictures in this story help you understand the character?

  • Using the illustration on page ___, what new problem do you think (character) has now?


  • What did the character look like at the beginning, middle, and end of the story? Use the illustrations and text to support your answer.

  • Look at the illustrations on pages _____. What details do you notice about the characters shown that help you learn more about them?


RL9 Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.

  • Compare the two stories that were read in class. What do they have in common? How are they different?

  • Invite students to make comparisons between the plot and events in versions of the same story.

  • Compare two versions of the same story. Ask students: What is the same about the two stories? What is different about each story?

  • Read two versions of the same story. Where does version one of the story take place? Is the setting the same as the setting in version two of the story? How are the characters the same and different? How are the events the same and different? Do the same ingredients go into the soup?

  • How are the stories ______ and ______ alike and different?

  • After reading two versions of the same folktale by different authors, explain how they are alike and different.

    • How are the [Cinderella stories from China and the United States] the same and different?

  • Have students complete the following frames:

    • The stories are similar because ___________________.
    • The stories are different because ___________________.


    • Both authors wanted readers to learn _________________________.



Reading Informational Text Standards:

*For each of the questions below, ask students to support their answer with evidence from the text.
RI 2 Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.

  • What is the main idea of the text we just read?

  • What are the important details found in the text we just read?

  • Details help us visualize what ____ is/are like. What are some detail words you might use to describe the ______you read about?

  • What is the main idea of the paragraph?

  • What details on the page support the main idea that ______?

  • What is the topic of page _____?

  • What are some details that describe ________?

  • What is the main topic on pages______? How do you know?

  • What are these paragraphs mainly about? How do these paragraphs relate to each other?

  • How does this section relate to the topic of this selection?

  • How do the headings help you figure out the main idea of the section?

  • What is the most important thing that happened because of _____? Which details help you to know this?

  • What details does the author give to show that ______?

  • What is the topic of _____?

  • As I read this page/section/passage, I learned that there are many ____. How does this detail help me figure out the main idea? What is the main idea of this passage/section?
  • Discuss with a partner the key details you learned on these pages about ____. Let’s list the details on our chart. (Main idea and key details graphic organizer).


  • Let’s review the key details on the chart. What do they all have in common? We can use how they are connected to help us figure out the main idea. How can we state the main idea about all of these?

  • Choose the details from this section that were the most important. Think about what they have in common and group them together. Use the groups of details to find the main idea for each part of the text.

  • Remind students that the main idea or main topic is what the text is mostly about. After reading, ask “What is the most important point the author makes?”

  • What is the main focus of each paragraph on this page? How do these paragraphs relate to the main topic of the whole text/

  • What is the main topic of this selection? What key details do we learn about the topic on pages ___?

  • Use the key details that you have identified in this text to figure out the main idea or main topic.

  • What it the main idea or main topic in this text? How did the key details help you to know?

  • What is the main idea the author wants you to learn about this topic?

  • Remind students that when reading expository text, we look for the key details in the words, photographs, and captions. The main idea is the most important point the author makes about the topic. After reading, guide students to identify key details. Ask them, “Why is this an important detail?” “What does it tell you about__?”

  • What is the main idea of the boxed information on this page?

RI 3 Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in text.


  • What is the connection between ___ and ___?

  • Describe the connection between ____ and ____.

  • How do you think this will affect _____?

  • What might have happened if ____ didn’t happen?

  • How does ___ affect ____?

  • What are some problems that might occur if _______?

  • How are the two events connected? Which is the cause and which is the effect?

  • What is the cause and effect relationship between ____ and ____?

  • Why is it important to _____ before ___?

  • What would happen if one of the steps were not followed properly?

  • What would happen if (a person/animal) skipped that step?

  • What would happen if the order of the steps was mixed up?

  • How is _____connected to _____?

  • How are the steps connected?

  • What would happen if step____ was missed?

  • What happened after______?

  • What happed before_______?

  • How did _____’s knowledge of ______ help________?

  • How does ___ happen?

  • What is the first event on the timeline? How did this event impact the next two events?

  • What connections can you make between ideas that were presented long ago and inventions that we have available today?

  • How is life different now than _______?

  • How is life today different from when ______ was alive?

  • Describe the life cycle of a _______.

  • What events lead up to [the first Thanksgiving]?

  • Why was [Christopher Columbus’ voyage] important?

  • What are the steps in [building a sandbox]? Why is it important to [sand the wood before it is painted]?


RI 4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.


  • What word in the same sentence might give you a hint about what a _____is?

  • What word in the heading might be a hint?

  • What context clues on this page help you figure out what this word means?

  • What words or phrases in the last sentence on page____ help you figure out what _____ means? What does ____mean?

  • What do you think the author means when he/she says _________?

  • What does the heading ________ mean?

  • The compound word _______________ is made of two smaller words ____________ and ___________. It must mean _____________________________________.

  • Use what you know about prefixes to figure out the meaning of ________________ on page ______.

  • What details does the author include to support the main idea ___________________________?

  • Turn to a partner and discuss any terms you did not understand the first time you read these pages. Which part can you reread to help you?

  • What does the word _____ mean in [paragraph 2]?

  • What does the phrase, _____ mean in [paragraph 4]?



RI 5 Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.

  • On which page does ____ begin?

  • Which selection begins on page _____?
  • Text features: Ask students to fill out a table with the following heading, “Text Feature,” “Page Number,” “Purpose.”


  • What does the bold type indicate?

  • What does the heading tell you?

  • How does this help you understand the text better?

  • How does the caption on page ____ help you understand what ____means?

  • Which section tells the reader about _______? List the title and page number.

  • What is the purpose of the diagram?

  • What do the different labels and captions tell you?

  • Discuss with a partner why the author included headings. How have they helped you understand what you read?

  • How do the section headings connect to the title?

  • How does the information in the box relate to the section?

  • How do the headings help you figure out the main idea of each section?

  • If I want to learn about ____ what key words would I use?

  • How do captions help you find answers?

  • How do heading help you find answers?

  • What does the headline tell you about the article?

  • How does the heading give you information about the topic?

  • How does a caption give you information about the topic?

  • What guide words did you use to help you find more information about_____?

  • Using the index, on what page would you find_____?

  • How does the chapter title and caption help you figure out what is happening in these photos?

  • Read the question on _____. What answer does the caption on page______ give?


RI 6 Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.


  • Why do you think the author wrote this book?
  • Why do you think the author _______?


  • Why do you think the author used photographs instead of illustrations in this selection?

  • Why do you think the author wrote this selection?

  • Why do you think the author mentions _____ so many times?

  • Why does the author compare ____ to _____?

  • Why does the author use the heading _____ on page____?

  • What is the author’s main purpose for writing the text on page _____?

  • What is the author’s purpose for writing these pages?

  • Why do you think the author started the selection with ______?

  • Tell what the author’s purpose was for using words like_______.

  • Why do you think the author wrote this biography?

  • Does the author think that _______? Why or why not?

  • What is the author’s purpose for writing the paragraph on page _____?

  • Why do you think the author chose to organize the section by ______?

  • Why do you think the author included this information?

  • Tell students, “Authors write to tell information, explain, entertain, persuade, or describe. As you read, look for clues to the author’s purpose.” Use a graphic organizer to list Clues that lead to the Author’s Purpose. What do we read about on this page? What clue does the text give about the author’s purpose? Read ___ page. What clue does the author give about his purpose here? Add these clues to the chart. Both of these clues are about ____. What does this tell us about what the author’s purpose is?
  • Think about what you have read so far. What does the author want us to know? Add this information to the Clue box on your graphic organizer. As we finish reading, think about other information that will help us determine the author’s purpose. Add this information to your chart. Review the clues. What did the author tell us about? What was the author’s purpose in writing this?


  • What does the author want me to know from reading this text? What is the author’s purpose?

  • What is the author’s purpose for including the information in the box?

  • What is the author describing in this section? What does he want us to understand?

  • Look at the evidence the author is presenting about ____. What does the author want us to think about ___?

  • What is the author’s purpose for writing this section? What is the author’s purpose for writing the entire text?


RI 7 Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.

  • Look at the diagram on page___. How does it help you to understand the selection?

  • The text on page ____ gives a little information. The photo gives a lot more. What additional information do you get from the photo?

  • What clues from the text and photo tell you this is a ______?

  • How does the photo on this page help you understand the text?

  • What clues in the text and illustrations help you figure out the meaning of the word_____?

  • How do the photos and words help you describe______?

  • What details in the photos in the selection help you discover______?

  • Describe the photograph and discuss how the caption and labels help you understand the text.

  • How does the photo help you learn more about the topic?

  • How do the headings and illustrations help you understand what you read?

  • Explain how the chart and /or photos helped you understand what you were reading.

  • How might the picture on page____ help you learn more about____?

  • How does the illustration on page_____ relate to ______?


  • What does the chart tell you about _______?

  • Which pictures help you understand what the author did not tell you?

  • How does the picture on page_____ help explain why ____?

  • Based on the picture and text on the page, how do you think______?

  • How does the illustration help you understand what _______looks like?

  • How do the text, the caption, and the photo help you understand the word______?

  • Why do you think the author included an illustration here?

  • How does the photo help you understand the caption?

  • How does this illustration support what you read?

  • How does the diagram help the reader understand [how a person breathes]? Use examples from the diagram and the text to support your answer.

  • How does the diagram help the reader understand how to [put the chair together]? Use examples from the diagram and the text to support your answer.

  • How does the diagram help the reader understand how to [work the _____]? Use information in the diagram and the text to support your answer.


RI 8 Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.

  • The author says ________. What might be some reasons why the author thinks this?

  • Lists the facts and the opinions and the reasons the author gives for each.

  • The author states that ______. What details from the text tell you that_____?

  • Why did the author write_____?

  • Why do you think the author compares ____ with ____?
  • What reasons does the author give that supports the point that _______?


  • What details or information does the author use to support the idea that _______________________?

  • Which details in the article support the main points of the text?

  • How do the reasons the author gives support specific points?

  • How does the author support the point [that dolphins are smart]?



RI 9 Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

  • Have students list the things that were the same and different about the two texts.

  • Have students list the major ideas presented in the texts. Have students put a check mark by the ones found in both texts.

  • Have students share which ideas were the same and which were different in two texts.

  • Compare (selection title) with (selection title). How are the selections the same and different?

  • Make a list of what you were able to learn from text #1. Make a list of what you were able to learn from text #2. Compare and contrast what you learned about ____.

  • Have students compare the author’s purpose for each of the selections they read this week.

  • Have students compare the text features used in each of the selections to help the reader understand their key ideas.

  • Have students complete a foldable with tabs to compare key ideas presented in both of the selections. Comparing and contrasting what is the same and what is different.

  • After reading two texts on [dinosaurs], explain how the most important points in each text are alike and different.




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