Graphic Organizers



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Graphic Organizers




Mary Miller, Education Services Director

New York News Publishers Association

252 Hudson Avenue, Albany, NY 12210-1802

518-449-1667, Email: mmiller@nynpa.com
Sponsored and supported by:

New York State United Teachers, the Wyoming Press Association and the New York Newspapers Foundation

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet


Student Name


The Setting in History


DIRECTIONS: Before reading the story, discuss what you know about life in America in the turn of the 20th Century with one or more students or your entire class and fill in the chart below with what you know. After each chapter, fill in information you learn about life during that era. After you read the story, complete the last frame, explaining what more you want to know.


Know

Learned

Want to Know










FOLLOW-UP: Where can you learn more about life in the US during the early 1900s? Where can you verify the information the author provides about this time and place?

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet

Student Name


Parks and Open Spaces


DIRECTIONS: Before reading the story, discuss what you know about parks and opens spaces with one or more students or your entire class and fill in the chart below with what you know. After each chapter, fill in information you learn about these places. After you read the story, complete the last frame, explaining what more you want to know.


Know

Learned

Want to Know











FOLLOW-UP: Where can you learn more about parks and open spaces?

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet


Student Name


National Park or Monument Research Project


DIRECTIONS: Choose one of the parks or monuments established by President Theodore Roosevelt. Conduct some research about the place you selected and complete the chart below to the best of your ability. This will help you organize your thoughts to give a brief oral presentation to the class.


WHO? Who would enjoy visiting this park or monument?

WHAT? What is the name of the park or monument? What is the primary attraction there?



WHEN? When is this location open to the public? (season, days of the week, hours, etc)


WHERE? Where is your park or monument located? (Consider providing a map and/or directions)


WHY? Why was this location made a national park or monument by President Theodore Roosevelt? Is this reason still relevant today? Why or why not?



HOW? How would people get there? Is there an admission fee? If so, what is it?



FOLLOW-UP: Where can you learn more about the park or monument you selected? (Provide a website link that would answer this question. Verify your online resource as official and accurate.)

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –



Chapter One: An Historic Trip
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words:

converse

slum

photojournalist



crampted

autobiography

conserve

Assembly

erosion

poacher


conservation
Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. Who ran out to the back of the railroad car?

2. Who was he waving to?

3. Why was john Burroughs not surprised that the president went to wave to the children?

4. Where were Burroughs and Roosevelt going?

5. What did the two friends have in common?

What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. How old was Theodore Roosevelt at the time of this chapter? Give an exact number of years.

2. Why did Roosevelt give copies of Burroughs’ books to poor children?

3. What two jobs did Roosevelt have that helped him preserve nature in New York?

4. How does the author tell us that even nature experts did not know everything needed to save nature?

In your own words...

This chapter talks about the importance of education in helping to preserve our natural resources. What are some of the things you already know about the environment that help you understand the need to use natural resources carefully?




In the News

Travel is faster these days and it’s easier today for politicians to go see what is happening in other parts of this country and in other parts of the world. Find a story in the newspaper, in-print or online (you might have to look at more than one day’s issue) about a politician who is visiting somewhere. What is the purpose of the trip?


Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –

Chapter Two: A Best-Selling Nature Writer
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words:

course (v.)

detain

beechen


limpid

Treasury

notwithstanding

interval

deceptive
Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. What state was John Burroughs from?

2. What did he like to write about?

3. What city did John Burroughs live in after he left home?

4. What did he name his cabin?

5. Who were some famous people he knew?




What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. What are some ways you can tell that John Burroughs preferred living in the country?

2. Why did Burroughs move away from his boyhood home?

3. John Burroughs makes a joke, saying “The robin hops about freely upon the grass, notwithstanding the keeper’s large-lettered warning.” What was he suggesting that the sign said?

4. What does the last sentence in the chapter tell you about Theodore Roosevelt?

In your own words...

In John Burroughs time, people read in order to learn about faraway places, because there were no movies or televisions to show them these things. What is a faraway place you’ve learned about that you would like to visit? Write a brief essay telling about it, about why you would like to go there, and about how you learned about it.




In the News

We often think of film, TV and sports stars as “famous,” but there are other people who appear in the news from time to time. Look through today’s paper, in-print or online, for examples of people who are famous for reasons other than acting, music or sports.

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –

Chapter Three: The Nature-Loving City Boy
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words:

stall


exhibit

taxidermy

spectacles

legislator

dude

brigade


cavalry

assassinate


Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. What nickname did Theodore Roosevelt prefer?

2. What was the first exhibit in the “Roosevelt Museum of Natural History”?

3. What disease did Roosevelt suffer from as a child?

4. Where did he live for a time when he left New York?

5. How did Roosevelt become President of the United States?




What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. How do you know that Theodore Roosevelt was a curious child?

2. Why did he begin shooting animals?

3. How did finding out he needed glasses solve a question that had been bothering him?

4. How was Roosevelt able to show his love of nature as an adult?

5. How can you tell that Roosevelt was a good listener, even when he was upset?


In your own words...

Even though Roosevelt was a city person, he made real friends among the cowboys. Write a brief essay explaining why you think the rough, hard-working cowboys liked and respected Roosevelt.

What could young people learn from his example?


In the News

Roosevelt insisted that game wardens in the Adirondacks should be real woodsmen who were familiar with the forests and knew how to camp, hunt and fish. Look through today’s paper, in-print or online, for examples of jobs where it is important for a person to have experience in order to be able to do the job right. What type of actual experience do you think is necessary for each job?

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –

Chapter Four: The First National Park
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words:

debate


timber

territory

federal

occupied

cultivated

gorge


solitude
Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. When did Yellowstone become America’s first national park?

2. What other famous city park was made a few years before Yellowstone became a park?

3. What club helped pass strict laws to stop poachers in Yellowstone National Park?

4. What was the name of the Army officer in charge of Yellowstone in 1903?

5. Why did Roosevelt want to keep trains out of Yellowstone?




What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. Why was it important to Congress that Yellowstone not be good farming or timberland?

2. Why did Congress not just make Yellowstone a state park like they had Yosemite?

3. Why did Roosevelt order all the reporters and his extra staff to say outside the park?

4. Why did John Burroughs ride in a coach instead of on horseback?

In your own words...

In the first chapter, we saw how much Roosevelt loved meeting people. Now we see him wanting very much to be left alone. Write a brief essay, based on your own experience, about why someone would want to be around lots of people sometimes and to be alone some other times.


In the News

Look for a story in today’s newspaper, in-print or online, in which somebody has broken a regulation or law and in which the story tells the possible fine or punishment. Do the consequences seem too harsh, not harsh enough or just right?

Explain your answer.

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –



Chapter Five: Conservation and Preservation
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words:

preserve

declare

artifact

antiquities
Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. What is the environmental approach that makes the best use of natural resources?

2. What is the environmental approach that tries not to change natural resources?

3. Why did Roosevelt hate hats with fancy plumes?

4. Where was the first national wildlife refuge in America?

5. With whom did Roosevelt go camping in California?




What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. What occupation did Roosevelt use as an example of a person who would not waste resources?

2. What type of building project was Roosevelt in favor of that a preservationist would be against?

3. Why did Roosevelt declare Pelican Island a refuge instead of asking Congress to make it a law?

4. Why was Roosevelt eager to try to make Grand Canyon a national park?

5. What was important about Mesa Verde that made Roosevelt want to protect it?




In your own words...

Do you consider yourself a conservationist, a preservationist, or a little bit of both? Write an

essay explaining the reason for your answer and, if you said “a little bit of both,” explain how much of each you feel you are.

In the News

Major building projects these days have to be approved before they can begin building. Look through today’s paper, in-print or online, for stories about new building projects and for legal ads that tell about projects or changes in how land is going to be used.

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –


Chapter Six: The Circle of Life
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words:

predator

slain

sportsmanlike



grazing
Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. What activity did Roosevelt decide not to do on the trip?

2. Who wrote to John Burroughs and asked him to get Roosevelt not to hunt?

3. Who else didn’t want Roosevelt to hunt on the trip?

4. What toy was invented because of a hunting trip Roosevelt was on?


What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. Why did Roosevelt think killing cougars was helpful?

2. How did Burroughs feel about killing cougars?

3. What did Roosevelt see that made him start to think that killing predators was a bad idea?




In your own words...

Even though Roosevelt and Burroughs saw things in Yellowstone that made them begin to think differently about predator control, they didn’t change their minds right away. Write an essay about something that happened to you that made you begin to think differently about something. Did it make you change right away, or was it more gradual?



In the News

There is affectionate teasing and there is a way of mocking a prominent person that is not affectionate. Look at the editorial page of today’s paper, in-print or online, for examples of comments that are either affectionate teasing or hostile mockery. How can you tell one from the other? (How much does it depend on how you feel about the person about whom the jokes and comments are being made?)

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –

Chapter Seven: The Nature Fakers
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words:

botany


zoology

instinct

timetable

pastime

unpardonable

entitled

Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. What were writers called who made up things about animals?

2. What did John Burroughs do to make people think about the problem of nature fakers?

3. Did Theodore Roosevelt agree with Burroughs about the problem?

4. What two books did Roosevelt use as examples of fun fiction with animal characters?

5. What did Roosevelt say was “an outrage”?




What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. Why did Burroughs and Roosevelt object to nature fakers?

2. What joke did Roosevelt make about nature fakers while they were in Yellowstone?

3. Why did Roosevelt say “The Jungle Book” was all right for kids to read?

4. What harm did Roosevelt think could happen if kids read books by nature fakers?
In your own words...

Nature fakers made up untrue stories to amuse readers and sell books. Today, there are shows on television that make up facts and tell lies in order to entertain people. How do you feel about this modern kind of “nature faker”? Give examples and explain your opinion.



In the News

Look for stories in the news that are not important but are there to entertain the readers. Do these stories present “facts” you think are really opinions or might not be true? Explain.


Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet –

Chapter Eight: The People’s Country
Student Name
Vocabulary – define the following words and terms:

perpetuity

centennial

Louisiana Purchase

Arbor Day

irrigation

Facts and Details: Literal Meaning

1. Where did John Burroughs go after the friends were done visiting Yellowstone?

2. Who gave a speech at the entrance to Yellowstone National Park?

3. Why did Roosevelt go to St. Louis?

4. What special day did Roosevelt talk about at Grand Island, Nebraska?

5. What advice did Roosevelt give the people of Arizona about the Grand Canyon?

What’s Going On? Reading Comprehension

1. What did Roosevelt thank the people at the park entrance for?

2. What does the term “bully pulpit” mean?

3. How did his speech in Santa Fe differ from his speech at the Grand Canyon?

4. What was the main purpose of Roosevelt’s trip?
In your own words...

Roosevelt hoped that his trip to Yellowstone with John Burroughs and then throughout the west would make the American people think about the environment more than they had before. Has reading about this trip made you think more about our natural resources and the environment? Write a brief essay about what you think about these topics, and explain how you came to feel that way.



In the News

Theodore Roosevelt made many speeches during his trip, and, while some were about other political matters, many were about the environment. Look in today’s paper, in-print or online for a story about someone making a special effort to persuade people to agree with his or her position. How effective did it seem to be?

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet – Making Connections
Student Name


Text to Self, Text and World


DIRECTIONS: What connections can you make to Roosevelt, Burroughs and this story? Use the questions below to guide but not limit your thinking.
TEXT to SELF

Do you know anyone who is like President Roosevelt or John Burroughs in some way? Have you visited Yellowstone National Park or a place similar?


TEXT to TEXT

Have you read about anyone who reminded you of Roosevelt or any of the other characters? Have you read newspapers, books or viewed TV programs or movies about America during the early 1900s?


TEXT to WORLD

Do events told in the story remind you of current events in your community, state, nation or world?



FOLLOW-UP: Make connections between Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature and your newspaper and between conservation or preservation and current events that affect your community, state, nation and world.

Roosevelt, Burroughs and the Trip That Saved Nature” Student Worksheet – Problem Solving




Conservation/Preservation – Local, National, International


Name
DIRECTIONS: Look through the newspaper and find three stories–one local, one national and one international–that deal with environmental/conservation/preservation issues or problems. Record the headlines of the stories you find below.
Local

National

International

Next, briefly summarize the problem or issue that each article describes.



Local

National

International









For each, list three things you could do to help–as an individual, as a class or as part of a larger group.



Local

National

International






























FOLLOW-UP: What was one thing that you learned that you can do to help the environment?

Copyright 2014 Mike Peterson and NYNPA, All Rights reserved.



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