Mastering New Testament Greek Textbook Ted Hildebrandt Baker Academic



Download 5.03 Mb.
Page67/115
Date08.11.2016
Size5.03 Mb.
1   ...   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   ...   115

Introduction to Periphrastics

ei]mi< + participle is a periphrastic construction. Translate the periphrastic form as the normal tense of the verb. Mounce’s chart is helpful at this point (Basics, 277):


Translated Tense

Periphrastic Construction

Present

Present ei]mi<

+ Present participle

Imperfect

Imperfect ei]mi<

+ Present participle

Future

Future ei]mi<

+ Present participle

Perfect

Present ei]mi<

+ Perfect participle

Pluperfect

Imperfect ei]mi<<

+ Perfect participle

Future Perfect

Future ei]mi<<

+ Perfect participle

Genitive Absolutes


A genitive absolute links a participle and a noun or pronoun in the genitive case and is only loosely connected to the rest of the sentence. The subject of the sentence is not the subject of this participial construction.

Participle (gen.) + noun/pronoun (gen.)

o[ ga>r ]Ihsou?j e]ce

For Jesus had withdrawn, a crowd being in the place (Jn. 5:13).

Chapter 22 Summary: Infinitives

Introduction


Infinitives are verbal nouns usually indicated in English by a “to” + verb (e.g., He went inside to call a friend.). While in English an infinitive does not take a subject, it may take an object or be modified by some qualifier. For example: “He came to put the ball in the box” uses “the ball” as the object and “in the box,” which describes location, to modify the infinitive “to put.” With Greek infinitives, the tense indicates aspect rather than time of action:
Present represents progress/immediacy foregrounding action.

Aorist indicates complete/whole background action.

Perfect represents state of affairs frontground/dwelt upon action.
As a noun, an infinitive can be the subject of a sentence or the object of a finite verb. In Greek an infinitive may go with a noun in the accusative that functions as its subject.

Translations


Present = to continue to call (to call)

Past = to call



Perfect = to have called
Infinitive Forms

Active

Middle

Passive

Present Infinitive

lu

lu

lu

First Aorist Infinitive

lu?sai


lu

luqh?nai

Second Aorist Infinitive (lei


lipei?n

lipe

leifqh?nai

Perfect Infinitive

leluke

lelu

lelu

Present Infinitive of ei]mi<

ei#nai






Articular Infinitive


A Greek infinitive may also function adverbially by telling when a verbal action took place. Greek expresses this function by using a preposition + an article + infinitive.


dia<

+ article

+ infinitive

= because

ei]j

+ article

+ infinitive

= in order that

e]n

+ article

+ infinitive

= when, while


meta<

+ article

+ infinitive

= after

pri

+ article

+ infinitive

= before

pro<

+ article

+ infinitive

= before

pro

+ article

+ infinitive

= in order that




Share with your friends:
1   ...   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   ...   115


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2019
send message

    Main page