Reading – Grade 4 Unit of Study: Becoming an Active Reader of Narratives First Grading Period – Weeks 1 7 curriculum overview



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Reading – Grade 4


Unit of Study: Becoming an Active Reader of Narratives

First Grading Period – Weeks 1 - 7 CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas)

Unit Rationale

An active reader of narratives uses strategies such as the Reading Comprehension Process, visualization, inner voices, narrative structure, comparison and contrast, author’s purpose, characterization, and cause and effect to read and retell the stories of others.


Students need to understand how meaning is constructed from print. In order to construct meaning, readers also need to employ reading strategies. (Tovani, 2000).




Essential Questions

Guiding Questions

  • What strategies do I use to be an active reader of narrative text and how do they help me?




  • What can I use to make mind pictures about what I am reading?

  • What is my inner voice saying about the text?

  • What kind of notes should I write on the text to help me think about and remember what I have read?

  • How can I make the parts of the Reading Comprehension Process (APK, Purpose, Stop and Jot, and Summary) help me to understand and remember what I have read?

  • What are the parts of a narrative and how can they help me understand more?


  • How can I tell if the story is told in first or third person?

  • How can figuring out the author’s purpose help me remember what is important?

  • What Greek or Latin roots do I know that can help me figure out an unknown word?

  • How do I decide on a book to read and enjoy?

  • What do I do to prepare to give a book talk?

  • How can I be a good team member when I work in pairs or groups?

  • How can I determine cause and effect?

TEKS (Standards)

TEKS Specificity - Intended Outcome




(2) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and

use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A) determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin,

Greek, or other linguistic roots and

affixes

(B) use the context of the sentence (e.g., in-sentence example or definition) to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words or



multiple meaning words

(6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A) sequence and summarize the plot’s main events and explain their influence on future events

(B) describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and

(C) identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.

(9) Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g. generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).


(10) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author’s purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference between a stated and an implied purpose for an expository text.

Figure 19 TAC Fourth Grade

Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The students is expected to:

(A) establish purposes for reading selected texts based upon own or others’ desired outcome to enhance comprehension;

(C) monitor and adjust comprehension (e.g., using background knowledge, creating sensory images, reread a portion aloud, generating questions);



(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

I can:

  • visualize what I am reading about using the words and my own experiences (6)
  • monitor my reading by using “inner voices” to check if I am having a mental conversation about the narrative (6 A,B)


  • use my visualization and inner voices to annotate text and help me think about and remember what I have read (6)

  • use the parts of the Reading Comprehension Process (APK, Purpose, Stop and Jot, and Summary) to keep track of my reading (6 A,B, Figure 19 TAC A, C, E)

  • compare and contrast cultural customs in a narrative (10)

  • identify the elements of a narrative and how they apply to the text I am reading (6)

  • identify if the story is told in first or third person (6C)

  • determine the author’s purpose and whether it is stated or implied (10)

  • define word meanings based on Greek or Latin roots and/or context (2A,B)

  • choose my own text to read independently and give book talks (9,30)

  • work in cooperative pairs or groups (31)

  • determine cause and effect (11C)

Yo puedo:

  • visualizar lo que leo usando las palabras del texto y mis propias experiencias (6)

  • monitorear la lectura usando mis voces internas para averiguar si tengo una conversación mental acerca de la historia (6A, B)
  • usar mi visualización y voces internas para anotar el texto para ayudar mi comprensión y lo que recuerdo de mi lectura (6)


  • usar los componentes del Proceso de Comprensión (ACP, Propósito, Pausa y piensa, y resumen) para monitor mi comprensión (6 A,B)

  • hacer comparación y contraste de costumbres culturales en una narrativa (10)

  • identificar los componentes del la narrativa y cómo aplican al texto que leo (6)

  • identificar en que persona es la narración (primera (6C)

  • identificar el propósito del autor y averiguar si es redactada o implicada (10)

  • define word meanings based on Greek or Latin roots and/or context (2A,B)

  • escoger mi propio libro para leer independientemente y dar una charla del libro (9,30)

  • trabajar en grupos cooperativos (31)

  • identificar causa y efecto (11C)




(C)  describe explicit and implicit relationships among ideas in texts organized by cause-and-effect, sequence, or comparison; and

(E) summarize information in text, maintaining meaning and logical order

(30) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to speak coherently about the topic under discussion, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

(31) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher-and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon ideas of others






Evidence of Learning (Summative Assessment)

  1. Given a narrative passage, students will annotate it and answer questions with 80% accuracy.



Week 1 At a Glance

Main Selection: “A Visit with Grandpa,” pp. 22-38/ “Padres por un día,” pp. 23-39

A grade-appropriate novel can be used in place of this selection.





Spelling


Comprehension Focus Lesson

(*30 minutes)



Independent Reading Assignment

(*20 minutes)



Read Aloud

(10 minutes)



Monday

“Get to 50 Spelling”



Teacher Toolkit

Homework



  • Visualization



Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the first part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should draw at least two visualizations in their notebooks.


Routine:

  • Select a book appropriate to fourth grade level. See Recommended Books for 4th and 5th Grades in the Teacher Toolkit. Remember the main focus of the Read Aloud is student enjoyment!

  • Pre-read the book to be familiar with the content and to guide student discussion.

  • ask students to recap yesterday’s reading and make predictions.

  • model comments and reflections as you read.

  • find a few places to pause and invite students to comment in a “Think-Pair-Share.”

  • Collect words and phrases from the book for students to use in their writing




Tuesday

  • Visualization




Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the next part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should draw at least two visualizations in their notebooks.

Wednesday



  • Notebook Setup and the RCP

60 minutes


No independent reading today

Thursday

  • First and Third Person



Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the last part of the Scott Foresman selection or continue the novel. Students should begin the RCP on the selection and identify which person the story is told in.


Friday



Spelling Test

  • Setting in a Narrative (Scott Foresman)

English/Spanish pp. 20-21


Teacher monitors the whole group while complete the reading comprehension process. The students should work in pairs for the summary.

* These times are for Weeks 1 and 2 only, when there is no small group time.

CURRICULUM GUIDE

Guiding Questions

Essential Pre-requisite Skills

  • What can I use to make mind pictures about what I am reading?

  • How can I make the parts of the Reading Comprehension Process (APK, Purpose, Stop and Jot, and Summary) help me to understand and remember what I have read?

  • How can I tell if the story is told in first or third person?

  • How can I be a good team member when I work in pairs or groups?

1 (A) recognize that spoken words are represented in written English by specific sequences of letters (First Grade)

1 (C) demonstrate the one–to-one correspondence between a spoken word and a printed word in text (Kindergarten)

1 (A) decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns (Third Grade)

1 (B) use common syllabication patterns to decode words (Third Grade)

1 (C) decode words applying knowledge of common spelling patterns (Third Grade)

2 (B) ask relevant questions, seek clarification and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text (Third Grade)


5 (A) paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories (Third Grade)


TEKS Specificity - Intended Outcome

Instructional Model & Teacher Directions

The teacher will…

So students can….


Monday: Lesson on Visualization (30 Minutes) (6), (30), (31), Figure 19 (C)

Hook: Have students be silent and watch while you read and put a “think bubble” above your head at different intervals. Ask the students what it is that you are doing.

Focus: Part of becoming an active reader is to mentally interact with the text through visualization.

Teaching:

  • Choose a chapter book that has a chapter that encourages visualization.

  • Explain to students that visualization is a key skill in the process of making sense of texts. When you visualize, it is like you are watching the story while you read. It is like going to the movies, except the movie you’re watching is in your mind.

  • Have students copy the definition

  • Remind students that visualization is when you make pictures or movies in your head based on words from the text and your own experiences.

  • Have the students make a think bubble from tag board and tape it to an unsharpened pencil.

  • Explain that if students are not seeing pictures or their “thought bubbles” are crowded with thoughts and pictures NOT related to the text, they should REREAD until they have enough details to form a visual.
  • Tell students that if they cannot visualize what they are reading, then it is important to go back and reread until they can picture the story in their minds.


  • Read aloud and demonstrate holding up your think bubble and how you are seeing a picture in your mind. Talk about the words from the text that made you think it and how some of the picture comes from personal experience.

  • Tell students that they will be doing a “Think-Pair-Share” doing the same activity as you demonstrated.

  • Have students practice what a “Think-Pair-Share looks like. Ask them simple questions that they can share, such as favorite foods, shows, etc.

  • Read more of the book you have selected, having students raising their think bubbles whenever they see a picture. Choose a stopping point and have the students do their “Think-Pair-Share.”

  • When the students share, emphasize what influences their visualization.

  • Do one more “Think-Pair-Share.”

  • Have the students write their names on the back of the think bubbles and pass them in.

Closure:

  • Ask students to write what they have practiced today and what it means to them.


Tuesday: Lesson on Visualization (60 Minutes) (6), (30), (31), Figure 19 (C)
Hook: Have students be silent and watch while you read. Pause every so often to pretend to take a picture of the text with your invisible digital camera. Hold the invisible camera up to your face as if you are “viewing” the picture. Ask the students what it is that you are doing.

Focus: Part of becoming an active reader is to mentally interact with the text through visualization. With the help of words from the text and

Teaching:

  • You may continue with the chapter book from yesterday or choose an excerpt from another chapter book.

  • Review the definition of visualization from yesterday
  • Have students make a camera (Teacher Toolkit: Camera)


  • Remind students that visualization is when you make pictures in your head based on words from the text and your own experiences.

  • You may want to read a short section two times so that students can get a clear picture of what the words describe.

  • Demonstrate how the students should make a clicking sound as though they are taking pictures when they see a visual.

  • Share in large group.

  • Explain “Paraphrase Passport (Kagen)” where students can share their own ideas only after they accurately paraphrase the person who spoke before them.

  • Demonstrate how the procedure goes with you and two other students.

  • Divide students in groups of three and have them stare at the back of their cameras as they describe the pictures they see. For each time you pause, they should take turns going first.

  • Have students share what their paraphrase was.

  • Repeat several times.

  • Ask students to write what they have practiced today and what it means to them.



Wednesday: Lesson on Notebook Setup and the RCP (60 Minutes) (6)(A), Fig. 19 (A), (C), (E)
Hook:

Show a model of an organized notebook, telling the students, “This, too, can be yours!”



  • Ask students why we read (Possible answers: to get meaning from the text, to understand something, learn how to do something, learn information about something, or enjoy a story).

  • Emphasize that real readers DO NOT read to learn more words, read faster, pass a test, or get better grades. These are things that happen because you read for the answers on the chart tablet. They are not the real reasons that people read.

  • List these reasons on a chart tablet.

  • Have students copy.



Focus: Become an active reader by using the Reading Comprehension Process (RCP) (including Reader’s Notebook Setup)

Teaching:

  • Divide the students into groups of three (same as yesterday).

  • Have a posters or chart tablet pages for each group to fill in.

  • Explain what a couch potato is. On one side have them draw a couch potato, and on the other side an active reader (perhaps an athletic looking person with a book) (Teacher Toolkit: Coach Potato Reader).

  • Ask them what they have been learning about this week that is something that an active reader does (visualization). Have them list it on their chart/poster.

  • Their goal for this year is to learn everything they can to become an active reader. Tell them your goal is to get them to read for enjoyment and deeper meaning.

  • Distribute the RCP (Reading Comprehension Process) template from the Teacher Toolkit (Teacher Toolkit: Reading Comprehension Process) Have students glue it in their notebooks with a glue stick.

  • Talk about why active readers naturally use each step of the process in their heads. Write something down and have students copy.

  • Let student groups add what they need to the poster.

  • On the overhead, chart tablet, or board, write the title of the selection you will be reading and a date (use a copy of a short selection without any questions – a familiar fairy tale is suggested). Have the student copy in their notebooks.

  • Have them write the template on the page.

  • Have students skim through the selection and make comments about any illustrations. Ask them what they already know about the fairy tale.
  • Use what the students derive from skimming (Teacher Toolkit: Skimming and Scanning Strategy) and write it down in the Reader’s Notebook next to “APK.” It is not necessary to write full sentences in this step. You write and the students copy.


  • Talk about the difference between narrative and expository texts. Then, write “narrative /narrativa” for this selection.

  • Do the same for the purpose.

  • Explain that when they read narratives they will expect to see characters, Tell the students that you will be modeling this monitoring out loud as you read and look up from the text.

  • Read the text aloud (first half), making comments as you go along. Every so often, ask yourself aloud, “Do I understand what I just read?” or “Was I paying attention to what I was reading?” Show students how you reread certain sections when you don’t understand and think them through (aloud).

  • Explain that the part of the written RCP that we use for monitoring is “Stop and Jot/Pausa, piensa, y anota.” Explain that, in our minds, we really are stopping and jotting lots of times during our reading, but in the RCP we are writing Stop and Jots two to three times. There are lots of different ways that we can stop and jot. One of them is to write one single word. This is a word that we think is important to the story line or main idea. It could be a word from the text, or a word from our heads that relates to the big idea in the text (Teacher Toolkit: Getting Started: What Do Students Stop and Jot?).

  • Determine 3 stopping points (per day) and have the students help you brainstorm words to write. They should be prepared to discuss their reason for choosing this word. Have students copy what you write.
  • Tell them the next step is React and Reflect. Many times S&J and R/R will be one and the same step. Tell students that readers do this the whole time they are reading because it helps understanding and makes the reading enjoyable. “We are only going to write one React and Reflect. This is where you get to give your opinion about what you are reading. You get to say whatever you want as long as it is related to the reading.”


  • Model your own react and reflect. Have the students do a “Think-Pair-Share” with their opinions. Have a few of them share with the whole group. Then have them write their opinions down next to “R/R.”

  • Explain that the final part of the RCP is to summarize. Explain that you will summarize by retelling. Review the story and have students help come up with a class summary.

Have them copy it (the summary) down in their notebooks.

Closure:

Ask students

  • What have we been studying about today?/¿Qué estrategía estudiamos hoy?

  • How does this help you in your reading? /¿Cómo te ayude la estrategía? (It helps me get ready for my reading and pay attention to what I am reading so that I can understand more.)


Thursday: Lesson on First and Third Person (30 Minutes) (6) (C)

Hook:

  • Tell a humorous story about yourself that is either recent or from your childhood.

  • After you tell the story, ask the students who it was about (They should say, “you.”) Ask them what words gave them the clue that it was about you (They should say, “I, me, my, etc).

Focus: Determine whether a story is told in first or third person

Teaching:

  • Explain that when you tell your own story, you are telling it in first person. In other words, the narrator is part of the story, It is called First Person because you are # 1!

  • Have students open their notebooks and do what is described in this right column.
  • Next tell a short story about someone in your family (where you are not a part of the story). Ask the students if that story was told in first person. Ask how they know.


  • Explain that when you tell a story that is about someone else (and you, as the narrator are not a part of the story), it is told in Third Person.

  • Stories are told either in first or third person.

  • Ask students why people often don’t believe information that they receive from someone who told it as third person.

  • This does not mean that third person stories are untrue. But, if you say the story actually happened to you, people will think that you remember the details better.

  • Gather a group of five stories, some told in first person, some told in third person, and read an excerpt aloud of each. Have students write whether the story was told in first or third person.

  • Group students in pairs and give them 10 minutes to write a very short story in either first or third person.

Closure:

Ask students

  • What have we been studying about today?/¿Qué estudiamos hoy?

  • How does this help you in your reading? /¿Cómo te la ayude en la lectura?


Friday: Lesson on Setting in a Narrative (30 Minutes) (Scott Foresman Skills Lesson, pp. 20-21 ) (6)



Monday




  • make a think bubble with tag board, and unsharpened pencil, and tape.


  • monitor their imagery




  • use words from the text and personal experiences to visualize.

  • observe the teacher’s metacognition for visualization




  • practice a “Think-Pair-Share”


  • describe their visualization orally in a “Think-Pair-Share” citing the text and personal experience




  • write summary of today’s lesson

Tuesday


  • observe a demonstration of visualization with a digital camera as a metaphor



  • visualize




  • remember the definition of visualization




  • make a “camera” to simulate visualization




  • understand that visualization sometimes requires rereading


  • observe the teacher’s demonstration of the camera visualization



  • practice a “Paraphrase Passport” procedure.



  • describe their visualization orally in a “Paraphrase Passport Group” citing the text and personal experience




  • write summary of today’s lesson


Wednesday


  • see a model of what their notebooks should look like



  • copy “The Reasons We Read” in their notebooks



  • work in a group of three to make a poster about “Couch Potato Readers” and “Active Readers”


  • glue the Reading Comprehension Process Template in their notebooks for easy reference for each day’s entry


  • write the reasons why active readers use each step of the RCP

  • add to the active reader poster



  • skim the selection in pairs using the Skimming and Scanning Strategy (Allen 2004).



  • fill in the steps of the RCP, copying from the teacher


  • observe the teacher monitoring her/his reading




  • practice monitoring reading within the RCP




  • write a Stop and Jot



  • Do React/Reflect in a “Think-Pair-Share



  • Copy a summary from the teacher



  • Add to their Active Reader posters and hang them up


Thursday

  • tell who the story is about

  • identify what person the story was told in




  • draw a stick figure (in their notebooks) telling a story with the words, “First Person” written under the picture. In a speech bubble, list the following words, (I, me, mine, our, we, us) (Español: verbos de primera persona - verbos que terminan en –o, í,é –mos yo, mí, me, mío, nos, nuestro, etc.)

  • Decide if another story is told in first person.



  • draw a stick figure (in their notebooks) telling a story with the words, “Third Person” written under the picture. In a speech bubble, list the following words, (verbos de tercera personal, él, ella, ellos, su, sus, etc )

  • describe why people tend to doubt information told in third person


  • number in their notebooks # 1 - 5

  • decide whether a story is told in first or third person

  • write a short story in 10 minutes in first or third person in pairs and trade with another group to identify which person it is written in.




Week 2 At a Glance

Main Selection: “Train to Somewhere,” pp. 58-65/ “El largo camino” pp. 45-63

A grade-appropriate novel can be used in place of this selection.





Spelling


Comprehension Focus Lesson

(*30 minutes)



Independent Reading Assignment

(*20 minutes)



Read Aloud

(10 minutes)



Monday

“Get to 50 Spelling”



Teacher Toolkit

Homework



  • Visualization with “Get the Picture”




Read a section out of a chapter book and write 3 “Get the Pictures” at 3 stopping points.

Routine:

  • Select a book appropriate to fourth grade level. See Recommended Books for 4th and 5th Grades in the Teacher Toolkit. Remember the main focus of the Read Aloud is student enjoyment!

  • Pre-read the book to be familiar with the content and to guide student discussion.

  • ask students to recap yesterday’s reading and make predictions.
  • model comments and reflections as you read.


  • find a few places to pause and invite students to comment in a “Think-Pair-Share.”

  • Collect words and phrases from the book for students to use in their writing




Tuesday




Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the first part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should write the APK, Purpose, and Stop and Jot.

Wednesday



  • Inner Voices




Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the second part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should stop 2 times for Stop and Jot and write the inner voices.

Thursday

  • Inner Voices




Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the third part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should copy the format of the inner voice sheets and stop 3 times to write inner voices.

Friday



Spelling Test

  • Sequence and Summarization (Scott Foresman)

English, pp. 44-44/Spanish pp. 42-43



Teacher monitors the whole group. Together students write a sequenced summary of this week’s reading. They should have a clear beginning, middle, and end.

* These times are for Weeks 1 and 2 only, when there is no small group time.

CURRICULUM GUIDE

Guiding Questions

Essential Pre-requisite Skills

  • What can I use to make mind pictures about what I am reading?

  • What is my inner voice saying about the text?

  • How can I make the parts of the Reading Comprehension Process (APK, Purpose, Stop and Jot, and Summary) help me to understand and remember what I have read?

  • How can I be a good team member when I work in pairs or groups?



1 (A) recognize that spoken words are represented in written English by specific sequences of letters (First Grade)

1 (C) demonstrate the one–to-one correspondence between a spoken word and a printed word in text (Kindergarten)

1 (A) decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns (Third Grade)

1 (B) use common syllabication patterns to decode words (Third Grade)

1 (C) decode words applying knowledge of common spelling patterns (Third Grade)

2 (B) ask relevant questions, seek clarification and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text (Third Grade)


5 (A) paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories (Third Grade)


TEKS Specificity - Intended Outcome

Instructional Model & Teacher Directions

The teacher will…

So students can….


Monday: Lesson on Visualization with “Get the Picture” or “Capta la idea” (30 Minutes) (6), (30), (31, Figure 19 (C)

Hook: Pass out the think bubbles. Choose an excerpt from a chapter book that encourages visualization. Read aloud from the book and stop to put your thought bubble above your head and describe the visualization you are getting. Invite the students to do the same. When you see several think bubbles up, pause and ask the student for his/her visualization. Encourage them to use the phrase, “I can visualize . . .” and then ask her/him to identify which words influenced their visualization, as well as any pictures that were influenced by personal experience (such as seeing an event happening in their school hallway).

Focus: Another way to demonstrate visualization in reading is through “Get the Picture” or “Capta la idea”.

Teaching:

  • Remind students about the definition for visualization and how they have used words to describe a mental picture.

  • Tell them that today the will learn to take a visualization snapshot in words with “Get the Picture.”

  • Draw the following for all to see:

    Get the Picture

    • Who’s there?





    • What’s happening (at that point)?




    • Where are they?




    • When does this occur (present, past, future, time of day, time of year)?




    • What is the feeling or mood?




  • Give an example like the one at the end of p. 10 of Because of Winn Dixie. Read aloud to that page and then demonstrate how you do “Get the Picture or “Capta la idea” for visualization.

    Because of Winn Dixie p.10

    • Who’s there? Opal, the dog, and the store manager

    • What’s happening? The dog licked the manager’s face and Opal made up a name for the dog trying to pretend it was hers.

    • Where are they? They are at the grocery store.

    • When does this occur (present, past, future, time of day, time of year)? It’s the middle of the day. It seems like summer or a Saturday because Opal is not in school.

    • What is the feeling or mood? excited




  • Tell students to keep in mind that this is a visualization technique to get a snapshot of the last episode they read about (or where they stopped). It is not a summarization of a passage or a chapter. (Teacher Toolkit: Getting Started: Stop and Jot: Get the Picture/Capta la idea).

  • Have students copy the “Get the Picture” example and draw their own blank “Get the Picture.”
  • Now, tell students that they will be divided into investigative teams of three. Each investigator will have a different job to complete in “Get the Picture.” They should fill in each person’s notebook and sign it.


  • These are the investigative jobs:

    • Who’s Who/ Mood Ring: completes who’s there and feeling/mood

    • S’up Dude: completes what’s happening at that particular point

    • GPS: completes where and when

  • Read aloud and have the investigative teams complete and report.

  • Have the students switch roles and do one more together.

Closure:

  • Ask students to share orally what strategy they have learned to do visualization.

  • Emphasize that this is one of the stop and jots student can use.

  • Have students add “Get the Picture” to their “Active Reader” charts.


Tuesday: Lesson on APK, Purpose (30 Minutes) (6)(A), Fig. 19 (A), (C), (E)

As a teacher, what you do (or don’t do) before your students read a major literary work will determine their level of motivation and interest. This in turn will have a direct effect on their level of comprehension. (Kelly Gallagher in Deeper Reading, p. 37, 2004)

Hook:

  • Turn on your overhead projector or Elmo and display something that is out of focus.

  • Ask students to comment on what you are showing them.

  • Tell students that the reason you will be teaching about APK, Purpose, and Stop and Jot is to focus their reading. When they read without these strategies, their understanding is often blurry.

Focus: Activating Prior Knowledge (APK), Setting a Purpose, and Stopping and Jotting are activities that help students focus their thinking and retain more of what they read.

Teaching:
  • Tell students that today they will be reading a piece on Orphan Trains from the Scott Foresman book. So, in order to activate their knowledge, you are going to build background.


  • Read aloud the piece on Orphan Trains from the following website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/orphan/

  • Pause to explain some parts that may be confusing to students.

  • Have students periodically turn and talk to a partner about what they have learned so far about Orphan Trains.

  • Write down some things that students have learned on a chart tablet.

  • Explain to students that the purpose of Activating Prior Knowledge is to get them focused or in the frame of mind for reading about the topic.

  • Have students write down title of the story, the date, and the template for the Reading Comprehension Process in their notebooks.

  • As a whole group, decide what should go next to APK for the story.

  • Have students skim through the selection (Teacher Toolkit: Skimming and Scanning) to find out what they will be reading to find out (this requires prediction).

  • Together write the purpose: “I’m reading this to find out . . .”

  • Tell students that purpose is everything. If you don’t know what you’re reading for, you’re wandering around a selection not knowing what you’re looking for.


Closure:

  • Ask students to share with their turn and talk partners what the benefits of APK and Purpose is.

  • Have students add this to their “Active Reader” charts.



Wednesday: Lesson on Inner Voices (30 Minutes) (6)(A)(B), Fig. 19 (A), (C)
Hook:

  • Ask students if they have ever heard voices in their heads.

  • Tell them that skilled readers hear voices all the time, but they’re not crazy voices; they’re good voices that help them comprehend.

Focus: Inner voices are the metacognitive voices that converse with the text while we are reading.


Teaching:


  • Distribute the sheet on inner voices. Have students glue the sheet in their notebooks.

  • Tell students that today you are going to work on making them more aware of their voices are telling them about their reading.

  • Ask students to read a short passage from yesterday.

  • Ask the students if they could hear the voice pronouncing the words while they read.

  • Tell students that this is just one of the voices in their heads when they read. If the pronouncing words voice is the only voice you are conscious of, you are not really understanding what you read.

  • The second voice is the conversation voice.

  • In order to learn what the conversation voice does, do this “Four Corners” activity.

  • Choose a selection from a children’s magazine (like Highlights) and make 4 copies of it.

  • Ask students to choose a corner based on a candy preference (make sure they know you are not offering the actual candy).

1.Kit -Kat, 2.Gummy Bears, 3.Sour Punch Straws, 4.Snickers

  • Have students go to their preferred corner. They need to choose a recorder. They have two tasks. One is to explain what is so good about the candy chosen. The next is to read the selection twice aloud and write the type of response that are on their task card (1 card per group):

1.Kit -Kat Group: Make connections between the selection and the reader

2.Gummy Bears Group: Ask questions of the text

3.Sour Punch Straws Group: Give opinions and talk back to the text

4.Snickers Group: Remember what is read (Teacher Toolkit: 4 Corners)


  • Before students begin, make sure that you give them an example of what their inner voice response should look like.


  • Have students share what inner voice responses they have come up with. Record them on a chart titled, “Inner Voices.”

Closure:

Ask students

  • In the students’ notebooks, have them list the four kinds of inner voice responses they can have.

  • In a voice bubble, have students write the benefits of inner voice.


Thursday: Lesson on Inner Voices (30 Minutes) (6)(A)(B), Fig. 19 (A), (C)

  • Put your hand to the back of your ear as if you are trying to listen intently.

  • Ask students what you are doing.

  • Tell them that you are listening to your inner voices.

  • Review yesterday’s lesson.

Focus: Inner voices are the metacognitive voices that converse with the text while we are reading.

Teaching:

  • Choose another article from a children’s magazine

  • Distribute a copy of the inner voice sheet to each student.

  • Ask that students bring their sheets from yesterday.

  • Give another article to students and have students reconvene in their “candy group” from yesterday.

  • Give another article to each group to read. Ask them to choose 3 stopping points to write down inner voices

  • Then ask the reader to pause at these points and write their inner voice comments.

  • Have students share with the small group.

  • Have students share with the large group.


Closure:

Ask students

  • What have we been studying about today?/¿Qué estudiamos hoy?
  • How does this help you in your reading? /¿Cómo te ayude en la lectura?



Friday: Lesson on Sequence in Summarization (30 Minutes) (Scott Foresman Skills Lesson, pp. 20-21 ) Figure 19(E)



Monday



  • hold up their think bubbles to indicate they are seeing a visualization

  • share in “Think Pair Share” partners

  • monitor their mental imagery

  • use words from the text and personal experiences to visualize.



  • observe the teacher’s demonstration of “Get the Picture”



  • help the teacher fill in each blank



  • copy the filled in example

  • in investigative teams, complete the “Get the Picture” graphic for the next section of the read aloud



  • switch roles and complete another “Get the Picture” graphic



  • orally share a description of the strategy they have learned to do visualization



Tuesday

  • Comment on things that are out of focus.



  • listen to a read aloud about the orphan trains

  • turn and talk to a partner about what they learned about Orphan Trains



  • share out information learned from the read aloud

  • write the RCP template in their notebooks



  • write the APK

  • skim and scan to find a purpose for reading

  • determine the purpose of the selection



  • add the strategy to the “Active Reader” chart


Wednesday


  • read the sheet on inner voices
  • glue the sheet in their notebooks




  • read yesterday’s selection to become conscious of the voices in their heads



  • employ the “Four Corners’ activity which involves practice on using inner voices


  • choose a favorite candy to form a group

  • explain why it is there favorite as a group




  • read aloud a magazine article

  • practice responding with inner voices as a group





  • write the types of inner voice they can have and the benefits



  • bring their inner voice sheets for reference to group



  • read the article



  • write down inner voices on sheet


  • share with the small and large group




  • review the skill studied.





Week 3 At a Glance

Main Selection: “Yingtao’s New Friend,” pp. 71-87/ “El nuevo amigo de Yingtao” pp. 71-87





Spelling


Comprehension Focus Lesson

(30 minutes)


Small Group/Independent Reading Assignment

(45 minutes)


Read Aloud

(10 minutes)



Monday

“Get to 50 Spelling”



Teacher Toolkit

Homework



  • Inner Voices Revisited




Read a section out of a chapter book and write 3 “Get the Pictures” at 3 stopping points.

Routine:

  • Select a book appropriate to fourth grade level. See Recommended Books for 4th and 5th Grades in the Teacher Toolkit. Remember the main focus of the Read Aloud is student enjoyment!

  • Pre-read the book to be familiar with the content and to guide student discussion.

  • ask students to recap yesterday’s reading and make predictions.

  • model comments and reflections as you read.

  • find a few places to pause and invite students to comment in a “Think-Pair-Share.”

  • Collect words and phrases from the book for students to use in their writing




Tuesday

  • Narrative Structure




Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the first part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should write the APK, Purpose, and Stop and Jot.

Wednesday



  • Compare and Contrast with Attribute Charts




Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the second part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should stop 2 times for Stop and Jot and write the inner voices.

Thursday


The Reading Zone

  • Administer “Beginning of Year Student Interest Survey in Reading” (Teacher Toolkit: The Reading Zone)




Teacher monitors the whole group while students read the third part of the Scott Foresman selection or the novel. Students should copy the format of the inner voice sheets and stop 3 times to write inner voices.

Friday



Spelling Test


The Reading Zone

  • Introduce the Reading Zone




Teacher monitors the whole group. Together students write a sequenced summary of this week’s reading. They should have a clear beginning, middle, and end.


Directory: admin -> curric -> tsrs -> cg archive -> 2008-09 -> read-la cg -> gp1
gp1 -> Reading – Grade 2 Unit of Study: Establishing Routines First Grading Period – Week 1- 4 curriculum overview
read-la cg -> Bilingual Reading – Grade 3 Unit of Study: Critical Literacy Enhances Readers’ Understanding
gp1 -> Bilingual Reading – Grade 2 Unit of Study: Establishing Routines First Grading Period Weeks 1-4 curriculum overview
read-la cg -> Reading – Grade 3 Unit of Study: Readers are active and strategic Third Grading Period curriculum overview
read-la cg -> Reading – Grade 2 Unit of Study: Asking Questions Third Grading Period curriculum overview
read-la cg -> Bilingual Reading – Grade 2 Unit of Study: Visualización – Formando imágenes mentales Fourth Grading Period curriculum overview
read-la cg -> Reading – Grade 1 Unit of Study: Reading is Comprehending Third Grading Period – Week 1- 5 curriculum overview
2008-09 -> Science – Grade 1 Unit of Study: Routines of Working As a scientist First Grading Period – Week 1 (5 Days) curriculum overview


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