Unit plan overview



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Department of Arts Administration, Education and Policy



UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

(Revised 2015)




Teacher Candidate

Trina Langsenkamp

School







UNIT TITLE

Zines

Length of Class Period

40/80

Approximate Number of Students in Each class

30

Beginning Date for this Unit




Ending Date for this Unit







Enduring Understandings

Personal Choice and Vision: Students construct and solve problems of personal relevance and interest when expressing themselves through visual art.

Critical and Creative Thinking: Students combine and apply artistic and reasoning skills to imagine, create, realize and refine artworks in conventional and innovative ways. Authentic

Literacy: As consumers, critics and creators, students evaluate and understand artworks and other texts produced in the media forms of the day





Progress Points

A. Understand and articulate the intrinsic worth and public value of arts and cultural participation.

B. Draw on a variety of sources to generate, select and evaluate ideas to create personally meaningful products.

C. Address and communicate complex visual and conceptual ideas using a range of technical skill and art media including new technologies.

D. Access and evaluate information from a variety of sources for visual reference with attention to ethical and legal issues.

E. Apply reasoning skills to communicate key ideas expressed in their artworks and the works of others and use appropriate criteria and language to critique the works.

F. Analyze and use digital tools to understand how and why images are created and interpreted and how media influences culture, beliefs and behaviors.







CRITICAL ISSUE / BIG IDEA

Anticipatory Set (what do the students already know, why is this lesson relevant?)

This is a photography class. Students have just finished a lesson and project on using text with photos. They learned about the work of artists such as Kruger and Holtzer who combine language with images. They learned about type tools on Photoshop and considered the implications of juxtaposing text and image.

In creating zines, students will use these skills to reflect an element of their own lives or to tell a story.



Central Focus (creating, presenting, interpreting, responding, and/or relating art to context)

Students will learn about the history of zines and other DIY art movements and interpret their importance in generating social change, as well as the impact they have had on contemporary art movements. Students will then create their own zine to articulate a contemporary issue or to tell a story about themselves.


Essential Questions (provocative, engaging, critical)

How can art influence social change?

Does art always have to be made to be seen?

What is DIY, and how has it influenced both amateur and professional artists?

Can art really make a difference? Why/why not?



Possible Integration

History, as well as social justice discussions





Description of the essential educational content of this unit

Lesson One




Title

Introduction to Zines

Lesson Description

Students are introduced to zines and their history. Examples are shared with the class.

Lesson Two





Title

Collection

Lesson Description

Students begin collecting materials to create their zines

Lesson Three




Title

Creation

Lesson Description

Students assemble their zines and reproduce for swapping.




Explain how technology has been used in this unit

Students will be taking digital photographs and may choose to use photoshop to manipulate them.

LESSON PLAN




Teacher Candidate

Trina Langsenkamp

School







LESSON NUMBER

1

Lesson Title

Introduction to Zines

Length of Class Period

40

Approximate Number of Students in Each class


30

Beginning Date for this Lesson




Ending Date for this Lesson







Content Statement – Perceiving/Knowing

2PE Identify and describe the sources artists use for visual reference and to generate ideas for artworks.

3PE Identify the relationship between community or cultural values and trends in visual art.

4PE Identify the factors that influence the work of individual artists.

5PE Describe the role of technology as a visual art medium.




Content Statement – Producing/Performing

1PR Demonstrate basic technical skill and craftsmanship with various art media when creating images from observation, memory and imagination.

5PR Investigate how to access available digital tools and innovative technologies to create and manipulate artwork. 6PR Identify and apply visual literacy as a means to create images that are personally expressive.




Content Statement – Responding/Reflecting

3RE Use appropriate vocabulary to define and describe techniques and materials used to create works of art.

4RE Investigate the role of innovative technologies in the creation and composition of new media imagery. 5RE Identify and explain one or more theories of aesthetics and visual culture.

6RE Identify various venues for viewing works of art.






Performance-based Assessment Objectives

Students will be able to understand the history of zines and other DIY movements, as well as to articulate their purposes in contemporary life.


Performance-based Assessment Strategies

(attach assessment documents if applicable)



Students will be formatively assessed for focus and understanding by asking essential questions that engage them as well as measure for preliminary assessment.





Academic Language

Vocabulary

Zine – a small circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images usually reproduced via photocopier.

Appropriate – take (something) for one's own use, typically without the owner's permission.

Collage – Assemblage of different materials to create a new composition

DIY – Do It Yourself




Additional Language Demands (specific communication task)

Students will be asked to consider and share issues that are important to them. They should also be able to use descriptive words to identify aspects of DIY art movements that create aesthetics.



Accommodations for Special Populations


A student in the tenth period class struggles with emotional difficulties related to an autism spectrum disorder. She is often bullied by other classmates. This project will allow her to invest herself in a topic of interest to her, and if needed she will be allowed to work separately from the class in the hall way or at her desk if needed.



Art/Visual Culture Examples

Zines brought in from friends to pass around to class, teacher example, Photographs of various zines.

http://poczineproject.tumblr.com/

http://wemakezines.ning.com/group/ohiozinesters

http://wildyouthzine.tumblr.com/






Preparations

Materials/Resources for Teacher

Teacher example, PowerPoint, other collected zine examples


Materials for Students



Safety Procedures

Some of the example zines have inappropriate language use that is blocked off with sharpie marker





Learning Activity

Getting the Classroom Environment Ready


PowerPoint is pulled up on screen


Procedures for the Teaching/Learning Structure (indicate approximate time for each step)

  1. Students enter the room and are greeted as they take their seats. (2 minutes)

  2. Once the classroom is quiet, the teacher begins the PowerPoint with the title slide. She asks if anyone has ever heard of zines before, and if some have, she asks them to share what they know. The next slide has a dictionary definition, which the teacher elaborates on. The following slide defines a key word that is in the definition: appropriate. She asks students to share what they may know about this word, and consider what it could mean in terms of art. She asks them to think about past projects where they may have appropriated to make their art (in their previous two projects they have used images from the internet to photoshop collages). The next few slides have pictures of zines that explain some of their purposes. The teacher discusses the historical background of zines, including their influence in DIY, punk and social justice movements. She shows some examples of these movements on a more local level by introducing them to Ohio Zinesters and POC Zine websites. (18 minutes)
  3. She then shows her teacher examples of zines. For the project, students have 3 choices. They can either: discuss a social/political issue, tell a story, or make an instructional manual. The teacher has examples of each of these. She points out that each zine incorporates each of the following: an original photograph, an appropriated image (either found online or in a magazine) and text. She emphasizes the importance of these three components and that they will be a part of the evaluation. (5 minutes)


  4. She then passes out the assignment sheet which has thumbnail planning pages attached to the back. For the remainder of the class, students are to begin brainstorming their ideas by selecting which kind of zine they will be making and what the topic of the zine will be, Once they have answered this on the front, they can begin drawing quick sketches of what they may want their pages to look like and what text/words they would like to include to coincide with their pictures. They are reminded that they will need both original and found images as well as text. (17 minutes)

  5. For cleanup, students put their work in their folders and leave when the bell dismisses them. (3 minutes)




Clean-up Procedures (Room, Materials & Work Storage)

  1. For cleanup, students put their work in their folders and leave when the bell dismisses them. (3 minutes)




Closure, Review & Anticipation (what’s next?)



Supplemental Activity






Teacher reflection focused on the lesson after it has been taught




LESSON PLAN





Teacher Candidate

Trina Langsenkamp

School







LESSON NUMBER

2

Lesson Title




Length of Class Period




Approximate Number of Students in Each class




Beginning Date for this Lesson




Ending Date for this Lesson







Content Statement – Perceiving/Knowing

2PE Identify and describe the sources artists use for visual reference and to generate ideas for artworks.

3PE Identify the relationship between community or cultural values and trends in visual art.

4PE Identify the factors that influence the work of individual artists.

5PE Describe the role of technology as a visual art medium.




Content Statement – Producing/Performing

1PR Demonstrate basic technical skill and craftsmanship with various art media when creating images from observation, memory and imagination.

5PR Investigate how to access available digital tools and innovative technologies to create and manipulate artwork. 6PR Identify and apply visual literacy as a means to create images that are personally expressive.



Content Statement – Responding/Reflecting

3RE Use appropriate vocabulary to define and describe techniques and materials used to create works of art.

4RE Investigate the role of innovative technologies in the creation and composition of new media imagery. 5RE Identify and explain one or more theories of aesthetics and visual culture.

6RE Identify various venues for viewing works of art.





Performance-based Assessment Objectives

Students will be able to work for the class period and begin shooting, finding text/images and laying out the formats of their zines.


Performance-based Assessment Strategies

(attach assessment documents if applicable)



Students will be formatively assessed by asking questions that measure their process and focus in working on the project.





Academic Language

Vocabulary

Zine – a small circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images usually reproduced via photocopier.

Appropriate – take (something) for one's own use, typically without the owner's permission.

Collage – Assemblage of different materials to create a new composition

DIY – Do It Yourself


Additional Language Demands (specific communication task)


Students will be asked to consider and share issues that are important to them. They should also be able to use descriptive words to identify aspects of DIY art movements that create aesthetics.





Accommodations for Special Populations

A student in the tenth period class struggles with emotional difficulties related to an autism spectrum disorder. She is often bullied by other classmates. This project will allow her to invest herself in a topic of interest to her, and if needed she will be allowed to work separately from the class in the hall way or at her desk if needed.


Art/Visual Culture Examples

Zines brought in from friends to pass around to class, teacher example, Photographs of various zines.

http://poczineproject.tumblr.com/

http://wemakezines.ning.com/group/ohiozinesters

http://wildyouthzine.tumblr.com/







Preparations

Materials/Resources for Teacher

Teacher example, PowerPoint, other collected zine examples


Materials for Students

Cameras available for students to rent, but many use their phones to photograph. Magazines will be provided for collages, and students have their own assigned computers for photoshop access. Planning worksheet, extra storyboard pages in needed, glue and scissors.



Safety Procedures

Some of the example zines have inappropriate language use that is blocked off with sharpie marker





Learning Activity

Getting the Classroom Environment Ready

There are some magazines available for students to use on the back table. Each table has bins supplied with scissors and glue sticks.


Procedures for the Teaching/Learning Structure (indicate approximate time for each step)

  1. The students arrive and the teacher takes attendance before beginning the class. (5 minutes)

  2. Once students are quiet, the teacher gives a brief reminder of what they had discussed in the previous class, asking review questions such as “what are zines?”, “who makes zines?” and “what are some of their purposes?” She then reminds them that they should have done some thinking and have come up with an idea that they have written in to their worksheet. She shows them that the back of their sheets has 6 boxes for planning a storyboard for their zine. She stresses the importance of pre-planning, even with just light sketches and jotted notes so that students are aware of what they will want to photograph and look for in appropriated images. There are extra storyboard sheets if needed. (5 minutes)
  3. The teacher then demonstrates a few basic methods for folding pages for zines. The easiest ones are just simple folds where multiple pages are either creased, stapled or stitched together in a pseudo-bind. A page can either be folded once to create four large sides, or folded twice, to create four smaller sides. To create a complete zine, the students will half to use two or more pages in these fold styles and connect them. She then demonstrates another method, where she uses a larger sized (11x18, typically) to fold in half vertically, and then twice (creating four panels) horizontally. She opens the paper up to show all of the creases. She points to the two center most vertical creases and indicates that this is where she will be making her cut. She folds the entire page in half horizontally so that these two desired creases are folded on top of each other and are accessible. She makes the cut. Keeping the page folded horizontally, she holds both ends of the paper and pushes them together so that the center area that was cut begins to open in to separate pages that can be re-creased to fold in to a booklet. This makes a final 6-sided booklet that does not need to be binded or stapled. (10 minutes)


  4. Students use the remainder of the class to plan, begin photographing, and start gathering materials for construction of zines. Students should have their planning pages approved by the teacher candidate or cooperating teacher prior to beginning their zine or photographic process. Students may leave the room to use the set up in the hallway to photograph, but they should not leave the floor they are on. The teacher will be walking around the room/hall work space to assess student focus and answer any clarifying questions they may have. (55 minutes)

  5. For cleanup, students are responsible for returning any materials they may have taken out, and for storing their own planning sheets in their folders. Magazines in the back table should be straightened up. If a large amount of students have left during the class to photograph, the teacher may choose to take attendance again at the end of the class to ensure that students did not leave early. (5 minutes)




Clean-up Procedures (Room, Materials & Work Storage)

  1. For cleanup, students are responsible for returning any materials they may have taken out, and for storing their own planning sheets in their folders. Magazines in the back table should be straightened up. If a large amount of students have left during the class to photograph, the teacher may choose to take attendance again at the end of the class to ensure that students did not leave early. (5 minutes)





Closure, Review & Anticipation (what’s next?)




Supplemental Activity






Teacher reflection focused on the lesson after it has been taught






LESSON PLAN




Teacher Candidate

Trina Langsenkamp

School







LESSON NUMBER

3

Lesson Title




Length of Class Period




Approximate Number of Students in Each class




Beginning Date for this Lesson




Ending Date for this Lesson







Content Statement – Perceiving/Knowing

2PE Identify and describe the sources artists use for visual reference and to generate ideas for artworks.

3PE Identify the relationship between community or cultural values and trends in visual art.

4PE Identify the factors that influence the work of individual artists.

5PE Describe the role of technology as a visual art medium.




Content Statement – Producing/Performing

1PR Demonstrate basic technical skill and craftsmanship with various art media when creating images from observation, memory and imagination.

5PR Investigate how to access available digital tools and innovative technologies to create and manipulate artwork. 6PR Identify and apply visual literacy as a means to create images that are personally expressive.



Content Statement – Responding/Reflecting

3RE Use appropriate vocabulary to define and describe techniques and materials used to create works of art.

4RE Investigate the role of innovative technologies in the creation and composition of new media imagery. 5RE Identify and explain one or more theories of aesthetics and visual culture.

6RE Identify various venues for viewing works of art.





Performance-based Assessment Objectives

Students final work should have at least 6 pages of text and images, use at least 3 original photographs, at least 2 appropriated images and should apply to one of the three options.

Performance-based Assessment Strategies

(attach assessment documents if applicable)


Students will be assessed on a rubric.





Academic Language

Vocabulary

Zine – a small circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images usually reproduced via photocopier.

Appropriate – take (something) for one's own use, typically without the owner's permission.

Collage – Assemblage of different materials to create a new composition

DIY – Do It Yourself




Additional Language Demands (specific communication task)

Students will be asked to consider and share issues that are important to them. They should also be able to use descriptive words to identify aspects of DIY art movements that create aesthetics.





Accommodations for Special Populations

A student in the tenth period class struggles with emotional difficulties related to an autism spectrum disorder. She is often bullied by other classmates. This project will allow her to invest herself in a topic of interest to her, and if needed she will be allowed to work separately from the class in the hall way or at her desk if needed.


Art/Visual Culture Examples

Zines brought in from friends to pass around to class, teacher example, Photographs of various zines.


http://poczineproject.tumblr.com/

http://wemakezines.ning.com/group/ohiozinesters

http://wildyouthzine.tumblr.com/







Preparations

Materials/Resources for Teacher

Teacher example, PowerPoint, other collected zine examples


Materials for Students

Cameras available for students to rent, but many use their phones to photograph. Magazines will be provided for collages, and students have their own assigned computers for photoshop access. Planning worksheet, extra storyboard pages in needed, glue and scissors.


Safety Procedures

Some of the example zines have inappropriate language use that is blocked off with sharpie marker







Learning Activity

Getting the Classroom Environment Ready

There are some magazines available for students to use on the back table. Each table has bins supplied with scissors and glue sticks.


Procedures for the Teaching/Learning Structure (indicate approximate time for each step)
  1. As students enter the room the teacher takes attendance (5 minutes).


  2. Once students are settled, the teacher gets their attention to begin class. She reminds them of what they have started on in the last class. She reminds them that it is crucial to complete planning prior to starting to photograph or assemble. (5 minutes)

3.Students have the remainder of the class to plan, begin photographing, and start gathering materials for construction of zines. Students should have their planning pages approved by the teacher candidate or cooperating teacher prior to beginning their zine or photographic process. Students may leave the room to use the set up in the hallway to photograph, but they should not leave the floor they are on. The teacher will be walking around the room/hall work space to assess student focus and answer any clarifying questions they may have. As students finish, they will need to start to consider the method in which they attach their pages. (65 minutes)



  1. For cleanup, students are responsible for returning any materials they may have taken out, and for storing their own planning sheets in their folders. Magazines in the back table should be straightened up. If a large amount of students have left during the class to photograph, the teacher may choose to take attendance again at the end of the class to ensure that students did not leave early. (5 minutes)



Clean-up Procedures (Room, Materials & Work Storage)
  1. For cleanup, students are responsible for returning any materials they may have taken out, and for storing their own planning sheets in their folders. Magazines in the back table should be straightened up. If a large amount of students have left during the class to photograph, the teacher may choose to take attendance again at the end of the class to ensure that students did not leave early. (5 minutes)








Closure, Review & Anticipation (what’s next?)

The teacher encourages students to make copies and swap zines with each other!







Teacher reflection focused on the lesson after it has been taught





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